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Models that contain the Receptor : Gaba

   Models   Description
3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 and the NEURON code of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
A 1000 cell network model for Lateral Amygdala (Kim et al. 2013)
1000 Cell Lateral Amygdala model for investigation of plasticity and memory storage during Pavlovian Conditioning.
A Model Circuit of Thalamocortical Convergence (Behuret et al. 2013)
“… Using dynamic-clamp techniques in thalamic slices in vitro, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to implement a realistic hybrid retino-thalamo-cortical pathway mixing biological cells and simulated circuits. … The study of the impact of the simulated cortical input on the global retinocortical signal transfer efficiency revealed a novel control mechanism resulting from the collective resonance of all thalamic relay neurons. We show here that the transfer efficiency of sensory input transmission depends on three key features: i) the number of thalamocortical cells involved in the many-to-one convergence from thalamus to cortex, ii) the statistics of the corticothalamic synaptic bombardment and iii) the level of correlation imposed between converging thalamic relay cells. In particular, our results demonstrate counterintuitively that the retinocortical signal transfer efficiency increases when the level of correlation across thalamic cells decreases. …”
A Moth MGC Model-A HH network with quantitative rate reduction (Buckley & Nowotny 2011)
We provide the model used in Buckley & Nowotny (2011). It consists of a network of Hodgkin Huxley neurons coupled by slow GABA_B synapses which is run alongside a quantitative reduction described in the associated paper.
A simple integrative electrophysiological model of bursting GnRH neurons (Csercsik et al. 2011)
In this paper a modular model of the GnRH neuron is presented. For the aim of simplicity, the currents corresponding to fast time scales and action potential generation are described by an impulsive system, while the slower currents and calcium dynamics are described by usual ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The model is able to reproduce the depolarizing afterpotentials, afterhyperpolarization, periodic bursting behavior and the corresponding calcium transients observed in the case of GnRH neurons.
A single column thalamocortical network model (Traub et al 2005)
To better understand population phenomena in thalamocortical neuronal ensembles, we have constructed a preliminary network model with 3,560 multicompartment neurons (containing soma, branching dendrites, and a portion of axon). Types of neurons included superficial pyramids (with regular spiking [RS] and fast rhythmic bursting [FRB] firing behaviors); RS spiny stellates; fast spiking (FS) interneurons, with basket-type and axoaxonic types of connectivity, and located in superficial and deep cortical layers; low threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, that contacted principal cell dendrites; deep pyramids, that could have RS or intrinsic bursting (IB) firing behaviors, and endowed either with non-tufted apical dendrites or with long tufted apical dendrites; thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells; and nucleus reticularis (nRT) cells. To the extent possible, both electrophysiology and synaptic connectivity were based on published data, although many arbitrary choices were necessary.
A two networks model of connectivity-dependent oscillatory activity (Avella OJ et al. 2014)
Activity in a cortical network may express a single oscillation frequency, alternate between two or more distinct frequencies, or continually express multiple frequencies. In addition, oscillation amplitude may fluctuate over time. Interactions between oscillatory networks may contribute, but their effects are poorly known. Here, we created a two model networks, one generating on its own a relatively slow frequency (slow network) and one generating a fast frequency (fast network). We chose the slow or the fast network as source network projecting feed-forward connections to the other, or target network, and systematically investigated how type and strength of inter-network connections affected target network activity. Our results strongly depended on three factors: the type of the relevant (main) connection, its strength and the amount of source synapses. For high inter-network connection strengths, we found that the source network could completely impose its rhythm on the target network. Interestingly, the slow network was more effective at imposing its rhythm on the fast network than the other way around. The strongest entrainment occurred when excitatory cells of the slow network projected to excitatory or inhibitory cells of the fast network. Just as observed in rat activity at the prefrontal cortex satisfies the behavior described above, such that together, our results suggest that input from other oscillating networks may markedly alter a network’s frequency spectrum and may partly be responsible for the rich repertoire of temporal oscillation patterns observed in the brain.
A two-layer biophysical olfactory bulb model of cholinergic neuromodulation (Li and Cleland 2013)
This is a two-layer biophysical olfactory bulb (OB) network model to study cholinergic neuromodulation. Simulations show that nicotinic receptor activation sharpens mitral cell receptive field, while muscarinic receptor activation enhances network synchrony and gamma oscillations. This general model suggests that the roles of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in OB are both distinct and complementary to one another, together regulating the effects of ascending cholinergic inputs on olfactory bulb transformations.
Afferent Integration in the NAcb MSP Cell (Wolf et al. 2005)
"We describe a computational model of the principal cell in the nucleus accumbens (NAcb), the medium spiny projection (MSP) neuron. The model neuron, constructed in NEURON, includes all of the known ionic currents in these cells and receives synaptic input from simulated spike trains via NMDA, AMPA, and GABAA receptors. ... results suggest that afferent information integration by the NAcb MSP cell may be compromised by pathology in which the NMDA current is altered or modulated, as has been proposed in both schizophrenia and addiction."
An attractor network model of grid cells and theta-nested gamma oscillations (Pastoll et al., 2013)
A two population spiking continuous attractor model of grid cells. This model combines the attractor dynamics with theta-nested gamma oscillatory activity. It reproduces the behavioural response of grid cells (grid fields) in medial entorhinal cortex, while at the same time allowing for nested gamma oscillations of post-synaptic currents.
AP back-prop. explains threshold variability and rapid rise (McCormick et al. 2007, Yu et al. 2008)
This simple axon-soma model explained how the rapid rising phase in the somatic spike is derived from the propagated axon initiated spike, and how the somatic spike threshold variance is affected by spike propagation.
Application of a common kinetic formalism for synaptic models (Destexhe et al 1994)
Application to AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptors is given in a book chapter. The reference paper synthesizes a comprehensive general description of synaptic transmission with Markov kinetic models. This framework is applicable to modeling ion channels, synaptic release, and all receptors. Please see the references for more details. A simple introduction to this method is given in a seperate paper Destexhe et al Neural Comput 6:14-18 , 1994). More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
Basket cell extrasynaptic inhibition modulates network oscillations (Proddutur et al., 2013)
Among the rhythmic firing patterns observed in brain, gamma oscillations, which are involved in memory formation and retrieval, are generated by networks of fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs) with robust interconnectivity through fast GABA synapses. Recently, we identified presence of extrasynaptic tonic GABA currents in FS-BCs and showed that experimentally-induced seizures enhance extrasynaptic tonic GABA currents and render GABA reversal potential (EGABA) depolarizing (Yu et al., 2013). Extrasynaptic GABA currents are mediated by extra- and peri-synaptically located GABAARs and can contribute to synaptic decay kinetics. Additionally, shunting rather than hyperpolarizing EGABA has been shown to increase the frequency and reduce coherence of network oscillations. Using homogeneous networks of biophysically-based, multi-compartmental model FS-BCs, we examined how the presence of extrasynaptic GABA currents and the experimentally identified seizure-induced alterations in GABA currents and EGABA modify the frequency and coherence of network firing.
Biophysically realistic neural modeling of the MEG mu rhythm (Jones et al. 2009)
"Variations in cortical oscillations in the alpha (7–14 Hz) and beta (15–29 Hz) range have been correlated with attention, working memory, and stimulus detection. The mu rhythm recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a prominent oscillation generated by Rolandic cortex containing alpha and beta bands. Despite its prominence, the neural mechanisms regulating mu are unknown. We characterized the ongoing MEG mu rhythm from a localized source in the finger representation of primary somatosensory (SI) cortex. Subjects showed variation in the relative expression of mu-alpha or mu-beta, which were nonoverlapping for roughly 50% of their respective durations on single trials. To delineate the origins of this rhythm, a biophysically principled computational neural model of SI was developed, with distinct laminae, inhibitory and excitatory neurons, and feedforward (FF, representative of lemniscal thalamic drive) and feedback (FB, representative of higher-order cortical drive or input from nonlemniscal thalamic nuclei) inputs defined by the laminar location of their postsynaptic effects. ..."
CA1 oriens alveus interneurons: signaling properties (Minneci et al. 2007)
The model supports the experimental findings showing that the dynamic interaction between cells with various firing patterns could differently affect GABAergic signaling, leading to a wide range of interneuronal communication within the hippocampal network.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: as a 2-layer NN and subthreshold synaptic summation (Poirazi et al 2003)
We developed a CA1 pyramidal cell model calibrated with a broad spectrum of in vitro data. Using simultaneous dendritic and somatic recordings, and combining results for two different response measures (peak vs. mean EPSP), two different stimulus formats (single shock vs. 50 Hz trains), and two different spatial integration conditions (within vs. between-branch summation), we found the cell's subthreshold responses to paired inputs are best described as a sum of nonlinear subunit responses, where the subunits correspond to different dendritic branches. In addition to suggesting a new type of experiment and providing testable predictions, our model shows how conclusions regarding synaptic arithmetic can be influenced by an array of seemingly innocuous experimental design choices.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: depolarization block (Bianchi et al. 2012)
NEURON files from the paper: On the mechanisms underlying the depolarization block in the spiking dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neurons by D.Bianchi, A. Marasco, A.Limongiello, C.Marchetti, H.Marie,B.Tirozzi, M.Migliore (2012). J Comput. Neurosci. In press. DOI: 10.1007/s10827-012-0383-y. Experimental findings shown that under sustained input current of increasing strength neurons eventually stop firing, entering a depolarization block. We analyze the spiking dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neuron models using the same set of ionic currents on both an accurate morphological reconstruction and on its reduction to a single-compartment. The results show the specic ion channel properties and kinetics that are needed to reproduce the experimental findings, and how their interplay can drastically modulate the neuronal dynamics and the input current range leading to depolarization block.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: rebound spiking (Ascoli et al.2010)
The model demonstrates that CA1 pyramidal neurons support rebound spikes mediated by hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih), and normally masked by A-type potassium channels (KA). Partial KA reduction confined to one or few branches of the apical tuft may be sufficient to elicit a local spike following a train of synaptic inhibition. These data suggest that the plastic regulation of KA can provide a dynamic switch to unmask post-inhibitory spiking in CA1 pyramidal neurons, further increasing the signal processing power of the CA1 synaptic microcircuitry.
Calcium influx during striatal upstates (Evans et al. 2013)
"... To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the relationship between calcium and AP timing, we have developed a realistic biophysical model of a medium spiny neuron (MSN). ... Using this model, we found that either the slow inactivation of dendritic sodium channels (NaSI) or the calcium inactivation of voltage-gated calcium channels (CDI) can cause high calcium corresponding to early APs and lower calcium corresponding to later APs. We found that only CDI can account for the experimental observation that sensitivity to AP timing is dependent on NMDA receptors. Additional simulations demonstrated a mechanism by which MSNs can dynamically modulate their sensitivity to AP timing and show that sensitivity to specifically timed pre- and postsynaptic pairings (as in spike timing-dependent plasticity protocols) is altered by the timing of the pairing within the upstate. …"
Cerebellar cortex oscil. robustness from Golgi cell gap jncs (Simoes de Souza and De Schutter 2011)
" ... Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. ..."
Cerebellar Nucleus Neuron (Steuber, Schultheiss, Silver, De Schutter & Jaeger, 2010)
This is the GENESIS 2.3 implementation of a multi-compartmental deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) neuron model with a full dendritic morphology and appropriate active conductances. We generated a good match of our simulations with DCN current clamp data we recorded in acute slices, including the heterogeneity in the rebound responses. We then examined how inhibitory and excitatory synaptic input interacted with these intrinsic conductances to control DCN firing. We found that the output spiking of the model reflected the ongoing balance of excitatory and inhibitory input rates and that changing the level of inhibition performed an additive operation. Rebound firing following strong Purkinje cell input bursts was also possible, but only if the chloride reversal potential was more negative than -70 mV to allow de-inactivation of rebound currents. Fast rebound bursts due to T-type calcium current and slow rebounds due to persistent sodium current could be differentially regulated by synaptic input, and the pattern of these rebounds was further influenced by HCN current. Our findings suggest that active properties of DCN neurons could play a crucial role for signal processing in the cerebellum.
Coding of stimulus frequency by latency in thalamic networks (Golomb et al 2005)
The paper presents models of the rat vibrissa processing system including the posterior medial (POm) thalamus, ventroposterior medial (VPm) thalamus, and GABAB- mediated feedback inhibition from the reticular thalamic (Rt) nucleus. A clear match between the experimentally measured spike-rates and the numerically calculated rates for the full model occurs when VPm thalamus receives stronger brainstem input and weaker GABAB-mediated inhibition than POm thalamus.
Comparison of full and reduced globus pallidus models (Hendrickson 2010)
In this paper, we studied what features of realistic full model activity patterns can and cannot be preserved by morphologically reduced models. To this end, we reduced the morphological complexity of a full globus pallidus neuron model possessing active dendrites and compared its spontaneous and driven responses to those of the reduced models.
Compartmentalization of GABAergic inhibition by dendritic spines (Chiu et al. 2013)
A spiny dendrite model supports the hypothesis that only inhibitory inputs on spine heads, not shafts, compartmentalizes inhibition of calcium signals to spine heads as seen in paired inhibition with back-propagating action potential experiments on prefrontal cortex layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in mouse (Chiu et al. 2013).
Competition model of pheromone ratio detection (Zavada et al. 2011)
For some closely related sympatric moth species, recognizing a specific pheromone component concentration ratio is essential for mating success. We propose and test a minimalist competition-based feed-forward neuronal model capable of detecting a certain ratio of pheromone components independently of overall concentration. This model represents an elementary recognition unit for binary mixtures which we propose is entirely contained in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of the male moth. A set of such units, along with projection neurons (PNs), can provide the input to higher brain centres. We found that (1) accuracy is mainly achieved by maintaining a certain ratio of connection strengths between olfactory receptor neurons (ORN) and local neurons (LN), much less by properties of the interconnections between the competing LNs proper. (2) successful ratio recognition is achieved using latency-to-first-spike in the LN populations which. (3) longer durations of the competition process between LNs did not result in higher recognition accuracy.
Composite spiking network/neural field model of Parkinsons (Kerr et al 2013)
This code implements a composite model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The composite model consists of a leaky integrate-and-fire spiking neuronal network model being driven by output from a neural field model (instead of the more usual white noise drive). Three different sets of parameters were used for the field model: one with basal ganglia parameters based on data from healthy individuals, one based on data from individuals with PD, and one purely thalamocortical model. The aim of this model is to explore how the different dynamical patterns in each each of these field models affects the activity in the network model.
Computer model of clonazepam`s effect in thalamic slice (Lytton 1997)
Demonstration of the effect of a minor pharmacological synaptic change at the network level. Clonazepam, a benzodiazepine, enhances inhibition but is paradoxically useful for certain types of seizures. This simulation shows how inhibition of inhibitory cells (the RE cells) produces this counter-intuitive effect.
Cortical network model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis (Bush et al 1999)
This simulation from Bush, Prince, and Miller 1999 shows the epileptiform response (Fig. 6C) to a brief single stimulation in a 500 cell network of multicompartment models, some of which have active dendrites. The results which I obtained under Redhat Linux is shown in result.gif. Original 1997 code from Paul Bush modified slightly by Bill Lytton to make it work with current version of NEURON (5.7.139). Thanks to Paul Bush and Ken Miller for making the code available.
DBS of a multi-compartment model of subthalamic nucleus projection neurons (Miocinovic et al. 2006)
We built a comprehensive computational model of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in parkinsonian macaques to study the effects of stimulation in a controlled environment. The model consisted of three fundamental components: 1) a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical model of the macaque basal ganglia, 2) a finite element model of the DBS electrode and electric field transmitted to the tissue medium, and 3) multicompartment biophysical models of STN projection neurons, GPi fibers of passage, and internal capsule fibers of passage. Populations of neurons were positioned within the 3D anatomical model. Neurons were stimulated with electrode positions and stimulation parameters defined as clinically effective in two parkinsonian monkeys. The model predicted axonal activation of STN neurons and GPi fibers during STN DBS. Model predictions regarding the degree of GPi fiber activation matched well with experimental recordings in both monkeys.
Dentate Basket Cell: spatial summation of inhibitory synaptic inputs (Bartos et al 2001)
Spatial summation of inhibitory synaptic input in a passive model of a basket cell from the dentate gyrus of rat hippocampus. Reproduces Figs. 5Ac and d in Bartos, M., Vida, I., Frotscher, M., Geiger, J.R.P, and Jonas, P.. Rapid signaling at inhibitory synapses in a dentate gyrus interneuron network. Journal of Neuroscience 21:2687-2698, 2001.
Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
Differential modulation of pattern and rate in a dopamine neuron model (Canavier and Landry 2006)
"A stylized, symmetric, compartmental model of a dopamine neuron in vivo shows how rate and pattern can be modulated either concurrently or differentially. If two or more parameters in the model are varied concurrently, the baseline firing rate and the extent of bursting become decorrelated, which provides an explanation for the lack of a tight correlation in vivo and is consistent with some independence of the mechanisms that generate baseline firing rates versus bursting. ..." See paper for more and details.
Dopamine-modulated medium spiny neuron, reduced model (Humphries et al. 2009)
We extended Izhikevich's reduced model of the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) to account for dopaminergic modulation of its intrinsic ion channels and synaptic inputs. We tuned our D1 and D2 receptor MSN models using data from a recent (Moyer et al, 2007) large-scale compartmental model. Our new models capture the input-output relationships for both current injection and spiking input with remarkable accuracy, despite the order of magnitude decrease in system size. They also capture the paired pulse facilitation shown by MSNs. Our dopamine models predict that synaptic effects dominate intrinsic effects for all levels of D1 and D2 receptor activation. Our analytical work on these models predicts that the MSN is never bistable. Nonetheless, these MSN models can produce a spontaneously bimodal membrane potential similar to that recently observed in vitro following application of NMDA agonists. We demonstrate that this bimodality is created by modelling the agonist effects as slow, irregular and massive jumps in NMDA conductance and, rather than a form of bistability, is due to the voltage-dependent blockade of NMDA receptors
Duration-tuned neurons from the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat (Aubie et al. 2009)
dtnet is a generalized neural network simulator written in C++ with an easy to use XML description language to generate arbitrary neural networks and then run simulations covering many different parameter values. For example, you can specify ranges of parameter values for several different connection weights and then automatically run simulations over all possible parameters. Graphing ability is built in as long as the free, open-source, graphing application GLE (http://glx.sourceforge.net/) is installed. Included in the examples folder are simulation descriptions that were used to generate the results in Aubie et al. (2009). Refer to the README file for instructions on compiling and running these examples. The most recent source code can be obtained from GitHub: https://github.com/baubie/dtnet
Duration-tuned neurons from the inferior colliculus of vertebrates (Aubie et al. 2012)
These models reproduce the responses of duration-tuned neurons in the auditory midbrain of the big brown bat, the rat, the mouse and the frog (Aubie et al. 2012). They are written in the Python interface to NEURON and a subset of the figures from Aubie et al. (2012) are pre-set in run.py (raw data is generated and a separate graphing program must be used to visualize the results).
Dynamic cortical interlaminar interactions (Carracedo et al. 2013)
"... Here we demonstrate the mechanism underlying a purely neocortical delta rhythm generator and show a remarkable laminar, cell subtype and local subcircuit delineation between delta and nested theta rhythms. We show that spike timing during delta-nested theta rhythms controls an iterative, reciprocal interaction between deep and superficial cortical layers resembling the unsupervised learning processes proposed for laminar neural networks by Hinton and colleagues ... and mimicking the alternating cortical dynamics of sensory and memory processing during wakefulness."
Dynamic dopamine modulation in the basal ganglia: Learning in Parkinson (Frank et al 2004,2005)
See README file for all info on how to run models under different tasks and simulated Parkinson's and medication conditions.
Effects of Chloride accumulation and diffusion on GABAergic transmission (Jedlicka et al 2011)
"In the CNS, prolonged activation of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) has been shown to evoke biphasic postsynaptic responses, consisting of an initial hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. A potential mechanism underlying the depolarization is an acute chloride (Cl(-)) accumulation resulting in a shift of the GABA(A) reversal potential (E(GABA)). The amount of GABA-evoked Cl(-) accumulation and accompanying depolarization depends on presynaptic and postsynaptic properties of GABAergic transmission, as well as on cellular morphology and regulation of Cl(-) intracellular concentration ([Cl(-)](i)). To analyze the influence of these factors on the Cl(-) and voltage behavior, we studied spatiotemporal dynamics of activity-dependent [Cl(-)](i) changes in multicompartmental models of hippocampal cells based on realistic morphological data. ..."
Effects of increasing CREB on storage and recall processes in a CA1 network (Bianchi et al. 2013)
Several recent results suggest that boosting the CREB pathway improves hippocampal-dependent memory in healthy rodents and restores this type of memory in an AD mouse model. However, not much is known about how CREB-dependent neuronal alterations in synaptic strength, excitability and LTP can boost memory formation in the complex architecture of a neuronal network. Using a model of a CA1 microcircuit, we investigate whether hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron properties altered by increasing CREB activity may contribute to improve memory storage and recall. With a set of patterns presented to a network, we find that the pattern recall quality under AD-like conditions is significantly better when boosting CREB function with respect to control. The results are robust and consistent upon increasing the synaptic damage expected by AD progression, supporting the idea that the use of CREB-based therapies could provide a new approach to treat AD.
Effects of KIR current inactivation in NAc Medium Spiny Neurons (Steephen and Manchanda 2009)
"Inward rectifying potassium (KIR) currents in medium spiny (MS) neurons of nucleus accumbens inactivate significantly in ~40% of the neurons but not in the rest, which may lead to differences in input processing by these two groups. Using a 189-compartment computational model of the MS neuron, we investigate the influence of this property using injected current as well as spatiotemporally distributed synaptic inputs. Our study demonstrates that KIR current inactivation facilitates depolarization, firing frequency and firing onset in these neurons. ..."
Effects of the membrane AHP on the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO) (Zhou & Colburn 2010)
This simulation study investigated how membrane afterhyperpolarization (AHP) influences spiking activity of neurons in the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO). The model incorporates a general integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with a first-order adaptation channel. Simulations focus on differentiating the effects of GAHP, tauAHP, and input strength on (1) spike interval statistics, such as negative serial correlation and chopper onset, and (2) neural sensitivity to interaural level difference (ILD) of LSO neurons. The model simulated electrophysiological data collected in cat LSO (Tsuchitani and Johnson, 1985).
Efficient Method for Computing Synaptic Conductance (Destexhe et al 1994)
A simple model of transmitter release is used to solve first order kinetic equations of neurotransmiter/receptor binding. This method is applied to a glutamate and gabaa receptor. See reference for more details. The method is extended to more complex kinetic schemes in a seperate paper (Destexhe et al J Comp Neuro 1:195-231, 1994). Application to AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptors is given in a book chapter (Destexhe et al In: The Neurobiology of Computation, Edited by Bower, J., Kluwer Academic Press, Norwell MA, 1995, pp. 9-14.) More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
Efficient simulation environment for modeling large-scale cortical processing (Richert et al. 2011)
"We have developed a spiking neural network simulator, which is both easy to use and computationally efficient, for the generation of large-scale computational neuroscience models. The simulator implements current or conductance based Izhikevich neuron networks, having spike-timing dependent plasticity and short-term plasticity. ..."
Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimer’s (Rowan et al. 2014)
"... As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. ... The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, ... Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. ... "
Emergence of physiological oscillation frequencies in neocortex simulations (Neymotin et al. 2011)
"Coordination of neocortical oscillations has been hypothesized to underlie the “binding” essential to cognitive function. However, the mechanisms that generate neocortical oscillations in physiological frequency bands remain unknown. We hypothesized that interlaminar relations in neocortex would provide multiple intermediate loops that would play particular roles in generating oscillations, adding different dynamics to the network. We simulated networks from sensory neocortex using 9 columns of event-driven rule-based neurons wired according to anatomical data and driven with random white-noise synaptic inputs. ..."
Encoding and retrieval in a model of the hippocampal CA1 microcircuit (Cutsuridis et al. 2009)
This NEURON code implements a small network model (100 pyramidal cells and 4 types of inhibitory interneuron) of storage and recall of patterns in the CA1 region of the mammalian hippocampus. Patterns of PC activity are stored either by a predefined weight matrix generated by Hebbian learning, or by STDP at CA3 Schaffer collateral AMPA synapses.
Epilepsy may be caused by very small functional changes in ion channels (Thomas et al. 2009)
We used a previously published model of the dentate gyrus with varying degrees of mossy fibre sprouting.We preformed a sensitivity analysis where we systematically varied individual properties of ion channels. The results predict that genetic variations in the properties of sodium channels are likely to have the biggest impact on network excitability. Furthermore, these changes may be as small as 1mV, which is currently undetectable using standard experimental practices.
Fast oscillations in inhibitory networks (Maex, De Schutter 2003)
We observed a new phenomenon of resonant synchronization in computer-simulated networks of inhibitory neurons in which the synaptic current has a delayed onset, reflecting finite spike propagation and synaptic transmission times. At the resonant level of network excitation, all neurons fire synchronously and rhythmically with a period approximately four times the mean delay of the onset of the inhibitory synaptic current. ... By varying the axonal delay of the inhibitory connections, networks with a realistic synaptic kinetics can be tuned to frequencies from 40 to >200 Hz. ... We conclude that the delay of the synaptic current is the primary parameter controlling the oscillation frequency of inhibitory networks and propose that delay-induced synchronization is a mechanism for fast brain rhythms that depend on intact inhibitory synaptic transmission.
Feedforward heteroassociative network with HH dynamics (Lytton 1998)
Using the original McCulloch-Pitts notion of simple on and off spike coding in lieu of rate coding, an Anderson-Kohonen artificial neural network (ANN) associative memory model was ported to a neuronal network with Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics.
Fluctuating synaptic conductances recreate in-vivo-like activity (Destexhe et al 2001)
This model (and experiments) reported in Destexhe, Rudolh, Fellous, and Sejnowski (2001) support the hypothesis that many of the characteristics of cortical neurons in vivo can be explained by fast glutamatergic and GABAergic conductances varying stochastically. Some of these cortical neuron characteristics of fluctuating synaptic origin are a depolarized membrane potential, the presence of high-amplitude membrane potential fluctuations, a low input resistance and irregular spontaneous firing activity. In addition, the point-conductance model could simulate the enhancement of responsiveness due to background activity. For more information please contact Alain Destexhe. email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
FS Striatal interneuron: K currents solve signal-to-noise problems (Kotaleski et al 2006)
... We show that a transient potassium (KA) current allows the Fast Spiking (FS) interneuron to strike a balance between sensitivity to correlated input and robustness to noise, thereby increasing its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). First, a compartmental FS neuron model was created to match experimental data from striatal FS interneurons in cortex–striatum–substantia nigra organotypic cultures. Densities of sodium, delayed rectifier, and KA channels were optimized to replicate responses to somatic current injection. Spontaneous AMPA and GABA synaptic currents were adjusted to the experimentally measured amplitude, rise time, and interevent interval histograms. Second, two additional adjustments were required to emulate the remaining experimental observations. GABA channels were localized closer to the soma than AMPA channels to match the synaptic population reversal potential. Correlation among inputs was required to produce the observed firing rate during up-states. In this final model, KA channels were essential for suppressing down-state spikes while allowing reliable spike generation during up-states. ... Our results suggest that KA channels allow FS interneurons to operate without a decrease in SNR during conditions of increased dopamine, as occurs in response to reward or anticipated reward. See paper for more and details.
Functional consequences of cortical circuit abnormalities on gamma in schizophrenia (Spencer 2009)
"Schizophrenia is characterized by cortical circuit abnormalities, which might be reflected in gamma-frequency (30–100 Hz) oscillations in the electroencephalogram. Here we used a computational model of cortical circuitry to examine the effects that neural circuit abnormalities might have on gamma generation and network excitability. The model network consisted of 1000 leaky integrateand- fi re neurons with realistic connectivity patterns and proportions of neuron types [pyramidal cells (PCs), regular-spiking inhibitory interneurons, and fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs)]. ... The results of this study suggest that a multimodal approach, combining non-invasive neurophysiological and structural measures, might be able to distinguish between different neural circuit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients. ..."
Gamma and theta rythms in biophysical models of hippocampus circuits (Kopell et al. 2011)
" ... the main rhythms displayed by the hippocampus, the gamma (30–90 Hz) and theta (4–12 Hz) rhythms. We concentrate on modeling in vitro experiments, but with an eye toward possible in vivo implications. ... We use simpler biophysical models; all cells have a single compartment only, and the interneurons are restricted to two types: fast-spiking (FS) basket cells and oriens lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM) cells. ... , we aim not so much at reproducing dynamics in great detail, but at clarifying the essential mechanisms underlying the production of the rhythms and their interactions (Kopell, 2005). ..."
Gamma oscillations in hippocampal interneuron networks (Bartos et al 2002)
To examine whether an interneuron network with fast inhibitory synapses can act as a gamma frequency oscillator, we developed an interneuron network model based on experimentally determined properties. In comparison to previous interneuron network models, our model was able to generate oscillatory activity with higher coherence over a broad range of frequencies (20-110 Hz). In this model, high coherence and flexibility in frequency control emerge from the combination of synaptic properties, network structure, and electrical coupling.
Gamma oscillations in hippocampal interneuron networks (Wang, Buzsaki 1996)
The authors investigated the hypothesis that 20-80Hz neuronal (gamma) oscillations can emerge in sparsely connected network models of GABAergic fast-spiking interneurons. They explore model NN synchronization and compare their results to anatomical and electrophysiological data from hippocampal fast spiking interneurons.
Globus pallidus neuron models with differing dendritic Na channel expression (Edgerton et al., 2010)
A set of 9 multi-compartmental rat GP neuron models (585 compartments) differing only in their expression of dendritic fast sodium channels were compared in their synaptic integration properties. Dendritic fast sodium channels were found to increase the importance of distal synapses (both excitatory AND inhibitory), increase spike timing variability with in vivo-like synaptic input, and make the model neurons highly sensitive to clustered synchronous excitation.
High frequency oscillations in a hippocampal computational model (Stacey et al. 2009)
"... Using a physiological computer model of hippocampus, we investigate random synaptic activity (noise) as a potential initiator of HFOs (high-frequency oscillations). We explore parameters necessary to produce these oscillations and quantify the response using the tools of stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR). ... Our results show that, under normal coupling conditions, synaptic noise was able to produce gamma (30–100 Hz) frequency oscillations. Synaptic noise generated HFOs in the ripple range (100–200 Hz) when the network had parameters similar to pathological findings in epilepsy: increased gap junctions or recurrent synaptic connections, loss of inhibitory interneurons such as basket cells, and increased synaptic noise. ... We propose that increased synaptic noise and physiological coupling mechanisms are sufficient to generate gamma oscillations and that pathologic changes in noise and coupling similar to those in epilepsy can produce abnormal ripples."
Hippocampal CA3 network and circadian regulation (Stanley et al. 2013)
This model produces the hippocampal CA3 neural network model used in the paper below. It has two modes of operation, a default mode and a circadian mode. In the circadian mode, parameters are swept through a range of values. This model can be quite easily adapted to produce theta and gamma oscillations, as certain parameter sweeps will reveal (see Figures). BASH scripts interact with GENESIS 2.3 to implement parameter sweeps. The model contains four cell types derived from prior papers. CA3 pyramidal are derived from Traub et al (1991); Basket, stratum oriens (O-LM), and Medial Septal GABAergic (MSG) interneurons are taken from Hajos et al (2004).
Hippocampus temporo-septal engram shift model (Lytton 1999)
Temporo-septal engram shift model of hippocampal memory. The model posits that memories gradually move along the hippocampus from a temporal encoding site to ever more septal sites from which they are recalled. We propose that the sense of time is encoded by the location of the engram along the temporo-septal axis.
Hopfield and Brody model (Hopfield, Brody 2000)
NEURON implementation of the Hopfield and Brody model from the papers: JJ Hopfield and CD Brody (2000) JJ Hopfield and CD Brody (2001). Instructions are provided in the below readme.txt file.
I&F recurrent networks with current- or conductance-based synapses (Cavallari et al. 2014)
Recurrent networks of two populations (excitatory and inhibitory) of randomly connected Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) neurons with either current- or conductance-based synapses from the paper S. Cavallari, S. Panzeri and A. Mazzoni (2014)
Ih tunes oscillations in an In Silico CA3 model (Neymotin et al. 2013)
" ... We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of Ih. Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket Ih allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal Ih also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via Ih’s ability to set pyramidal excitability. ..."
Interacting synaptic conductances during, distorting, voltage clamp (Poleg-Polsky and Diamond 2011)
This simulation examines the accuracy of the voltage clamp technique in detecting the excitatory and the inhibitory components of the synaptic drive.
Intracortical synaptic potential modulation by presynaptic somatic potential (Shu et al. 2006, 2007)
" ... Here we show that the voltage fluctuations associated with dendrosomatic synaptic activity propagate significant distances along the axon, and that modest changes in the somatic membrane potential of the presynaptic neuron modulate the amplitude and duration of axonal action potentials and, through a Ca21- dependent mechanism, the average amplitude of the postsynaptic potential evoked by these spikes. These results indicate that synaptic activity in the dendrite and soma controls not only the pattern of action potentials generated, but also the amplitude of the synaptic potentials that these action potentials initiate in local cortical circuits, resulting in synaptic transmission that is a mixture of triggered and graded (analogue) signals."
Ionic mechanisms of bursting in CA3 pyramidal neurons (Xu and Clancy 2008)
"... We present a single-compartment model of a CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neuron based on recent experimental data. We then use the model to determine the roles of primary depolarizing currents in burst generation. The single compartment model incorporates accurate representations of sodium (Na+) channels (NaV1.1) and T-type calcium (Ca2+) channel subtypes (CaV3.1, CaV3.2, and CaV3.3). Our simulations predict the importance of Na+ and T-type Ca2+ channels in hippocampal pyramidal cell bursting and reveal the distinct contribution of each subtype to burst morphology. We also performed fastslow analysis in a reduced comparable model, which shows that our model burst is generated as a result of the interaction of two slow variables, the T-type Ca2+ channel activation gate and the Ca2+-dependent potassium (K+) channel activation gate. The model reproduces a range of experimentally observed phenomena including afterdepolarizing potentials, spike widening at the end of the burst, and rebound. Finally, we use the model to simulate the effects of two epilepsy-linked mutations: R1648H in NaV1.1 and C456S in CaV3.2, both of which result in increased cellular excitability."
Irregular spiking in NMDA-driven prefrontal cortex neurons (Durstewitz and Gabriel 2006)
Slow N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) synaptic currents are assumed to strongly contribute to the persistently elevated firing rates observed in prefrontal cortex (PFC) during working memory. During persistent activity, spiking of many neurons is highly irregular. ... The highest interspike-interval (ISI) variability occurred in a transition regime where the subthreshold membrane potential distribution shifts from mono- to bimodality, ... Predictability within irregular ISI series was significantly higher than expected from a noise-driven linear process, indicating that it might best be described through complex (potentially chaotic) nonlinear deterministic processes. Accordingly, the phenomena observed in vitro could be reproduced in purely deterministic biophysical model neurons. High spiking irregularity in these models emerged within a chaotic, close-to-bifurcation regime characterized by a shift of the membrane potential distribution from mono- to bimodality and by similar ISI return maps as observed in vitro. ... NMDA-induced irregular dynamics may have important implications for computational processes during working memory and neural coding.
Ketamine disrupts theta modulation of gamma in a computer model of hippocampus (Neymotin et al 2011)
"Abnormalities in oscillations have been suggested to play a role in schizophrenia. We studied theta-modulated gamma oscillations in a computer model of hippocampal CA3 in vivo with and without simulated application of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist and psychotomimetic. Networks of 1200 multi-compartment neurons (pyramidal, basket and oriens-lacunosum moleculare, OLM, cells) generated theta and gamma oscillations from intrinsic network dynamics: basket cells primarily generated gamma and amplified theta, while OLM cells strongly contributed to theta. ..."
Kinetic synaptic models applicable to building networks (Destexhe et al 1998)
Simplified AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptor models useful for building networks are described in a book chapter. One reference paper synthesizes a comprehensive general description of synaptic transmission with Markov kinetic models which is applicable to modeling ion channels, synaptic release, and all receptors. Also a simple introduction to this method is given in a seperate paper Destexhe et al Neural Comput 6:14-18 , 1994). More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
KInNeSS : a modular framework for computational neuroscience (Versace et al. 2008)
The xml files provided here implement a network of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons, governed by either Hodgkin-Huxley or quadratic integrate-and-fire dynamical equations. The code is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the KInNeSS software package for simulation of networks of spiking neurons. The simulation protocol used here is meant to facilitate the comparison of KInNeSS with other simulators reviewed in Brette et al. (2007). See the associated paper "Versace et al. (2008) KInNeSS : a modular framework for computational neuroscience." for an extensive description of KInNeSS .
L5 PFC microcircuit used to study persistent activity (Papoutsi et al. 2014, 2013)
Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes.
Large cortex model with map-based neurons (Rulkov et al 2004)
We develop a new computationally efficient approach for the analysis of complex large-scale neurobiological networks. Its key element is the use of a new phenomenological model of a neuron capable of replicating important spike pattern characteristics and designed in the form of a system of difference equations (a map). ... Interconnected with synaptic currents these model neurons demonstrated responses very similar to those found with Hodgkin-Huxley models and in experiments. We illustrate the efficacy of this approach in simulations of one- and two-dimensional cortical network models consisting of regular spiking neurons and fast spiking interneurons to model sleep and activated states of the thalamocortical system. See paper for more.
Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
Lateral dendrodenditic inhibition in the Olfactory Bulb (David et al. 2008)
Mitral cells, the principal output neurons of the olfactory bulb, receive direct synaptic activation from primary sensory neurons. Shunting inhibitory inputs delivered by granule cell interneurons onto mitral cell lateral dendrites are believed to influence spike timing and underlie coordinated field potential oscillations. Lateral dendritic shunt conductances delayed spiking to a degree dependent on both their electrotonic distance and phase of onset. Recurrent inhibition significantly narrowed the distribution of mitral cell spike times, illustrating a tendency towards coordinated synchronous activity. This result suggests an essential role for early mechanisms of temporal coordination in olfaction. The model was adapted from Davison et al, 2003, but include additional noise mechanisms, long lateral dendrite, and specific synaptic point processes.
Layer V PFC pyramidal neuron used to study persistent activity (Sidiropoulou & Poirazi 2012)
"... Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS) and an intrinsic bursting (IB) model neuron. ... Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given stimulus that code for its ability to induce persistent activity and predict differential roles of RS and IB neurons in persistent activity expression. "
Learning intrinsic excitability in Medium Spiny Neurons (Scheler 2014)
"We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP) which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function). We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. ... "
Learning spatial transformations through STDP (Davison, Frégnac 2006)
A common problem in tasks involving the integration of spatial information from multiple senses, or in sensorimotor coordination, is that different modalities represent space in different frames of reference. Coordinate transformations between different reference frames are therefore required. One way to achieve this relies on the encoding of spatial information using population codes. The set of network responses to stimuli in different locations (tuning curves) constitute a basis set of functions which can be combined linearly through weighted synaptic connections in order to approximate non-linear transformations of the input variables. The question then arises how the appropriate synaptic connectivity is obtained. This model shows that a network of spiking neurons can learn the coordinate transformation from one frame of reference to another, with connectivity that develops continuously in an unsupervised manner, based only on the correlations available in the environment, and with a biologically-realistic plasticity mechanism (spike timing-dependent plasticity).
LGMD Variability and logarithmic compression in dendrites (Jones and Gabbiani, 2012, 2012B)
A compartmental model of the LGMD with a simplified, rake shaped, excitatory dendrite. It receives spontaneous input and excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs triggered by visual stimuli. It generates realistic responses to looming through the velocity dependent scaling and delay of individual excitatory synaptic inputs, with variability. We use the model to show that the key determinants of output variability are spontaneous input and temporal jitter of the excitatory inputs, rather than variability in magnitude of individual inputs (2012B, J Neurophysiol). We also use the model to analyze the transformation of the excitatory signals through the visual pathway; concluding that the representation of stimulus velocity is transformed from an expansive relationship at the level of the LGMD inputs to a logarithmic one at the level of its membrane potential (2012, J Neurosci).
Mathematical model for windup (Aguiar et al. 2010)
"Windup is characterized as a frequency-dependent increase in the number of evoked action potentials in dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical stimulation of afferent C-fibers. ... The approach presented here relies on mathematical and computational analysis to study the mechanism(s) underlying windup. From experimentally obtained windup profiles, we extract the time scale of the facilitation mechanisms that may support the characteristics of windup. Guided by these values and using simulations of a biologically realistic compartmental model of a wide dynamic range (WDR) neuron, we are able to assess the contribution of each mechanism for the generation of action potentials windup. ..."
MEC layer II stellate cell: Synaptic mechanisms of grid cells (Schmidt-Hieber & Hausser 2013)
This study investigates the cellular mechanisms of grid field generation in Medial Entorhinal Cortex (MEC) layer II stellate cells.
MEG of Somatosensory Neocortex (Jones et al. 2007)
"... To make a direct and principled connection between the SI (somatosensory primary neocortex magnetoencephalography) waveform and underlying neural dynamics, we developed a biophysically realistic computational SI model that contained excitatory and inhibitory neurons in supragranular and infragranular layers. ... our model provides a biophysically realistic solution to the MEG signal and can predict the electrophysiological correlates of human perception."
Modulation of septo-hippocampal theta activity by GABAA receptors (Hajos et al. 2004)
θ Frequency oscillation of the septo-hippocampal system has been considered as a prominent activity associated with cognitive function and affective processes. ... In the present experiments we applied a combination of computational and physiological techniques to explore the functional role of GABAA receptors in θ oscillation. ... In parallel to these experimental observations, a computational model has been constructed by implementing a septal GABA neuron model with a CA1 hippocampal model containing three types of neurons (including oriens and basket interneurons and pyramidal cells; latter modeled by multicompartmental techniques; for detailed model description with network parameters see online addendum: http://geza.kzoo.edu/theta). This connectivity made the network capable of simulating the responses of the septo-hippocampal circuitry to the modulation of GABAA transmission, and the presently described computational model proved suitable to reveal several aspects of pharmacological modulation of GABAA receptors. In addition, computational findings indicated different roles of distinctively located GABAA receptors in θ generation.
Motor cortex microcircuit simulation based on brain activity mapping (Chadderdon et al. 2014)
"... We developed a computational model based primarily on a unified set of brain activity mapping studies of mouse M1. The simulation consisted of 775 spiking neurons of 10 cell types with detailed population-to-population connectivity. Static analysis of connectivity with graph-theoretic tools revealed that the corticostriatal population showed strong centrality, suggesting that would provide a network hub. ... By demonstrating the effectiveness of combined static and dynamic analysis, our results show how static brain maps can be related to the results of brain activity mapping."
MyFirstNEURON (Houweling, Sejnowski 1997)
MyFirstNEURON is a NEURON demo by Arthur Houweling and Terry Sejnowski. Perform experiments from the book 'Electrophysiology of the Neuron, A Companion to Shepherd's Neurobiology, An Interactive Tutorial' by John Huguenard & David McCormick, Oxford University Press 1997, or design your own one or two cell simulation. For more information see http://www.cnl.salk.edu/Simulations. Salk Institute, Computational Neurobiology Lab, 10010 North Torrey Pines Rd., La Jolla CA 092037. Email: arthur@salk.edu
Na channel mutations in the dentate gyrus (Thomas et al. 2009)
These are source files to generate the data in Figure 6 from "Mossy fiber sprouting interacts with sodium channel mutations to increase dentate gyrus excitability" Thomas EA, Reid CA, Petrou S, Epilepsia (2009)
Network model of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex (Maex, De Schutter 1998)
We computed the steady-state activity of a large-scale model of the granular layer of the rat cerebellum. Within a few tens of milliseconds after the start of random mossy fiber input, the populations of Golgi and granule cells became entrained in a single synchronous oscillation, the basic frequency of which ranged from 10 to 40 Hz depending on the average rate of firing in the mossy fiber population. ... The synchronous, rhythmic firing pattern was robust over a broad range of biologically realistic parameter values and to parameter randomization. Three conditions, however, made the oscillations more transient and could desynchronize the entire network in the end: a very low mossy fiber activity, a very dominant excitation of Golgi cells through mossy fiber synapses (rather than through parallel fiber synapses), and a tonic activation of granule cell GABAA receptors (with an almost complete absence of synaptically induced inhibitory postsynaptic currents). The model predicts that, under conditions of strong mossy fiber input to the cerebellum, Golgi cells do not only control the strength of parallel fiber activity but also the timing of the individual spikes. Provided that their parallel fiber synapses constitute an important source of excitation, Golgi cells fire rhythmically and synchronized with granule cells over large distances along the parallel fiber axis. See paper for more and details.
Network model with neocortical architecture (Anderson et al. 2011 plus under review paper)
Architecturally realistic neocortical model using seven classes of excitatory and inhibitory single compartment Hodgkin-Huxley cells. This is an addendum to ModelDB Accession # 98902, Studies of stimulus parameters for seizure disruption (Anderson et al. 2007). Wiring is adapted from the minicolumn hypothesis and incorporates visual and neocortical wiring data. Simulation demonstrates spontaneous bursting onset and cessation. This activity can be induced by random fluctuations in the surrounding background input (Manuscript in preparation).
Network recruitment to coherent oscillations in a hippocampal model (Stacey et al. 2011)
"... Here we demonstrate, via a detailed computational model, a mechanism whereby physiological noise and coupling initiate oscillations and then recruit neighboring tissue, in a manner well described by a combination of Stochastic Resonance and Coherence Resonance. We develop a novel statistical method to quantify recruitment using several measures of network synchrony. This measurement demonstrates that oscillations spread via preexisting network connections such as interneuronal connections, recurrent synapses, and gap junctions, provided that neighboring cells also receive sufficient inputs in the form of random synaptic noise. ..."
Nigral dopaminergic neurons: effects of ethanol on Ih (Migliore et al. 2008)
We use a realistic computational model of dopaminergic neurons in vivo to suggest that ethanol, through its effects on Ih, modifies the temporal structure of the spiking activity. The model predicts that the dopamine level may increase much more during bursting than pacemaking activity, especially in those brain regions with a slow dopamine clearance rate. The results suggest that a selective pharmacological remedy could thus be devised against the rewarding effects of ethanol that are postulated to mediate alcohol abuse and addiction, targeting the specific HCN genes expressed in dopaminergic neurons.
NMDA subunit effects on Calcium and STDP (Evans et al. 2012)
Effect of NMDA subunit on spike timing dependent plasticity.
Nonlinear dendritic processing in barrel cortex spiny stellate neurons (Lavzin et al. 2012)
This is a multi-compartmental simulation of a spiny stellate neuron which is stimulated by a thalamocortical (TC) and cortico-cortical (CC) inputs. No other cells are explicitly modeled; the presynaptic network activation is represented by the number of active synapses. Preferred and non –preferred thalamic directions thus correspond to larder/smaller number of TC synapses. This simulation revealed that randomly activated synapses can cooperatively trigger global NMDA spikes, which involve participation of most of the dendritic tree. Surprisingly, we found that although the voltage profile of the cell was uniform, the calcium influx was restricted to ‘hot spots’ which correspond to synaptic clusters or large conductance synapses
Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell column formation (Migliore et al. 2007)
In the olfactory bulb, the processing units for odor discrimination are believed to involve dendrodendritic synaptic interactions between mitral and granule cells. There is increasing anatomical evidence that these cells are organized in columns, and that the columns processing a given odor are arranged in widely distributed arrays. Experimental evidence is lacking on the underlying learning mechanisms for how these columns and arrays are formed. We have used a simplified realistic circuit model to test the hypothesis that distributed connectivity can self-organize through an activity-dependent dendrodendritic synaptic mechanism. The results point to action potentials propagating in the mitral cell lateral dendrites as playing a critical role in this mechanism, and suggest a novel and robust learning mechanism for the development of distributed processing units in a cortical structure.
Olfactory Bulb Network (Davison et al 2003)
A biologically-detailed model of the mammalian olfactory bulb, incorporating the mitral and granule cells and the dendrodendritic synapses between them. The results of simulation experiments with electrical stimulation agree closely in most details with published experimental data. The model predicts that the time course of dendrodendritic inhibition is dependent on the network connectivity as well as on the intrinsic parameters of the synapses. In response to simulated odor stimulation, strongly activated mitral cells tend to suppress neighboring cells, the mitral cells readily synchronize their firing, and increasing the stimulus intensity increases the degree of synchronization. For more details, see the reference below.
Olfactory bulb network model of gamma oscillations (Bathellier et al. 2006; Lagier et al. 2007)
This model implements a network of 100 mitral cells connected with asynchronous inhibitory "synapses" that is meant to reproduce the GABAergic transmission of ensembles of connected granule cells. For appropriate parameters of this special synapse the model generates gamma oscillations with properties very similar to what is observed in olfactory bulb slices (See Bathellier et al. 2006, Lagier et al. 2007). Mitral cells are modeled as single compartment neurons with a small number of different voltage gated channels. Parameters were tuned to reproduce the fast subthreshold oscillation of the membrane potential observed experimentally (see Desmaisons et al. 1999).
Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule cell circuits (Migliore & McTavish 2013)
Model files for the entry "Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule Cell Circuits" of the Springer Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience by Michele Migliore and Tom Mctavish. The simulations illustrate two typical Mitral-Granule cell circuits in the olfactory bulb of vertebrates: distance-independent lateral inhibition and gating effects.
Optimal deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus-a computational study (Feng et al. 2007)
Here, we use a biophysically-based model of spiking cells in the basal ganglia (Terman et al., Journal of Neuroscience, 22, 2963-2976, 2002; Rubin and Terman, Journal of Computational Neuroscience, 16, 211-235, 2004) to provide computational evidence that alternative temporal patterns of DBS inputs might be equally effective as the standard high-frequency waveforms, but require lower amplitudes. Within this model, DBS performance is assessed in two ways. First, we determine the extent to which DBS causes Gpi (globus pallidus pars interna) synaptic outputs, which are burstlike and synchronized in the unstimulated Parkinsonian state, to cease their pathological modulation of simulated thalamocortical cells. Second, we evaluate how DBS affects the GPi cells' auto- and cross-correlograms.
Paired turbulence and light effect on calcium increase in Hermissenda (Blackwell 2004)
The sea slug Hermissenda learns to associate light and hair cell stimulation, but not when the stimuli are temporally uncorrelated...These issues were addressed using a multi-compartmental computer model of phototransduction, calcium dynamics, and ionic currents of the Hermissenda photoreceptor...simulations show that a potassium leak channel, which closes with an increase in calcium, is required to produce both the untrained LLD and the enhanced LLD due to the decrease in voltage dependent potassium currents.
Paradoxical GABA-mediated excitation (Lewin et al. 2012)
"GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system, but in some circumstances can lead to a paradoxical excitation that has been causally implicated in diverse pathologies from endocrine stress responses to diseases of excitability including neuropathic pain and temporal lobe epilepsy. We undertook a computational modeling approach to determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABAA-dependent excitation in isolated post-synaptic CA1 hippocampal neurons because it may constitute a trigger for pathological synchronous epileptiform discharge. In particular, the interplay intracellular chloride accumulation via the GABAA receptor and extracellular potassium accumulation via the K/Cl co-transporter KCC2 in promoting GABAA-mediated excitation is complex. ..."
Parametric computation and persistent gamma in a cortical model (Chambers et al. 2012)
Using the Traub et al (2005) model of the cortex we determined how 33 synaptic strength parameters control gamma oscillations. We used fractional factorial design to reduce the number of runs required to 4096. We found an expected multiplicative interaction between parameters.
Parvalbumin-positive basket cells differentiate among hippocampal pyramidal cells (Lee et al. 2014)
This detailed microcircuit model explores the network level effects of sublayer specific connectivity in the mouse CA1. The differences in strengths and numbers of synapses between PV+ basket cells and either superficial sublayer or deep sublayer pyramidal cells enables a routing of inhibition from superficial to deep pyramidal cells. At the network level of this model, the effects become quite prominent when one compares the effect on firing rates when either the deep or superficial pyramidal cells receive a selective increase in excitation.
Persistent synchronized bursting activity in cortical tissues (Golomb et al 2005)
The program simulates a one-dimensional model of a cortical tissue with excitatory and inhibitory populations.
Pipette and membrane patch geometry effects on GABAa currents patch-clamp exps (Moroni et al. 2011)
Ion currents, mediated by GABAa-receptors in outside-out membrane patches, may alter the concentration of Chloride ions inside the pipette and the membrane patch. GABAa-receptors are in fact ionotropic synaptic receptors, selective to Chloride ions. Therefore, chloride fluxes across the membrane patch correlate to GABAa-receptor opening. Chloride ions accumulation, depletion and diffusion, inside the pipette and the membrane patch, affect by definition the Chloride equilibrium (i.e. Nernst) electrical potential. This in turn changes the ionic driving force underlying GABAa-mediated currents. It follows that, in case of very small volumes and confined geometries, voltage-clamp recordings of GABAa-receptor currents carry information on both i) Chloride diffusion and ii) receptor kinetics. The relevance of (i) and (ii) have been studied numerically by defining a 1-dimensional biophysical model, released here to the interested user.
Population models of temporal differentiation (Tripp and Eliasmith 2010)
"Temporal derivatives are computed by a wide variety of neural circuits, but the problem of performing this computation accurately has received little theoretical study. Here we systematically compare the performance of diverse networks that calculate derivatives using cell-intrinsic adaptation and synaptic depression dynamics, feedforward network dynamics, and recurrent network dynamics. Examples of each type of network are compared by quantifying the errors they introduce into the calculation and their rejection of high-frequency input noise. ..."
Prosthetic electrostimulation for information flow repair in a neocortical simulation (Kerr 2012)
This model is an extension of a model (138379) recently published in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience. This model consists of 4700 event-driven, rule-based neurons, wired according to anatomical data, and driven by both white-noise synaptic inputs and a sensory signal recorded from a rat thalamus. Its purpose is to explore the effects of cortical damage, along with the repair of this damage via a neuroprosthesis.
Proximal inhibition of Renshaw cells (Bui et al 2005)
Inhibitory synaptic inputs to Renshaw cells are concentrated on the soma and the juxtasomatic dendrites. In the present study, we investigated whether this proximal bias leads to more effective inhibition under different neuronal operating conditions. Using compartmental models based on detailed anatomical measurements of intracellularly stained Renshaw cells, we compared the inhibition produced by GABAA synapses when distributed with a proximal bias to the inhibition produced when the same synapses were distributed uniformly. See paper for more and details.
Pyramidal Neuron: Deep, Thalamic Relay and Reticular, Interneuron (Destexhe et al 1998, 2001)
This package shows single-compartment models of different classes of cortical neurons, such as the "regular-spiking", "fast-spiking" and "bursting" (LTS) neurons. The mechanisms included are the Na+ and K+ currents for generating action potentials (INa, IKd), the T-type calcium current (ICaT), and a slow voltage-dependent K+ current (IM). See http://cns.fmed.ulaval.ca/alain_demos.html
Rapid desynchronization of an electrically coupled Golgi cell network (Vervaeke et al. 2010)
Electrical synapses between interneurons contribute to synchronized firing and network oscillations in the brain. However, little is known about how such networks respond to excitatory synaptic input. In addition to detailed electrophysiological recordings and histological investigations of electrically coupled Golgi cells in the cerebellum, a detailed network model of these cells was created. The cell models are based on reconstructed Golgi cell morphologies and the active conductances are taken from an earlier abstract Golgi cell model (Solinas et al 2007, accession no. 112685). Our results show that gap junction coupling can sometimes be inhibitory and either promote network synchronization or trigger rapid network desynchronization depending on the synaptic input. The model is available as a neuroConstruct project and can executable scripts can be generated for the NEURON simulator.
Reconstructing cerebellar granule layer evoked LFP using convolution (ReConv) (Diwakar et al. 2011)
The model allows reconstruction of evoked local field potentials as seen in the cerebellar granular layer. The approach uses a detailed model of cerebellar granule neuron to generate data traces and then uses a "ReConv" or jittered repetitive convolution technique to reproduce post-synaptic local field potentials in the granular layer. The algorithm was used to generate both in vitro and in vivo evoked LFP and reflected the changes seen during LTP and LTD, when such changes were induced in the underlying neurons by modulating release probability of synapses and sodium channel regulated intrinsic excitability of the cells.
Regulation of the firing pattern in dopamine neurons (Komendantov et al 2004)
Midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vivo exhibit two major firing patterns: single-spike firing and burst firing. The firing pattern expressed is dependent on both the intrinsic properties of the neurons and their excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Experimental data suggest that the activation of NMDA and GABAA receptors is crucial contributor to the initiation and suppression of burst firing, respectively, and that blocking calcium-activated potassium channels can facilitate burst firing. This multi-compartmental model of a DA neuron with a branching structure was developed and calibrated based on in vitro experimental data to explore the effects of different levels of activation of NMDA and GABAA receptors as well as the modulation of the SK current on the firing activity.
Reinforcement learning of targeted movement (Chadderdon et al. 2012)
Respiratory central pattern generator network in mammalian brainstem (Rubin et al. 2009)
This model is a reduced version of a spatially organized respiratory central pattern generation network consisting of four neuronal populations (pre-I, early-I, post-I, and aug-E). In this reduction, each population is represented by a single neuron, in an activity-based framework (which includes the persistent sodium current for the pre-I population). The model includes three sources of external drive and can produce several experimentally observed rhythms.
Sensorimotor cortex reinforcement learning of 2-joint virtual arm reaching (Neymotin et al. 2013)
"... We developed a model of sensory and motor neocortex consisting of 704 spiking model-neurons. Sensory and motor populations included excitatory cells and two types of interneurons. Neurons were interconnected with AMPA/NMDA, and GABAA synapses. We trained our model using spike-timing-dependent reinforcement learning to control a 2-joint virtual arm to reach to a fixed target. ... "
Simulated cortical color opponent receptive fields self-organize via STDP (Eguchi et al., 2014)
"... In this work, we address the problem of understanding the cortical processing of color information with a possible mechanism of the development of the patchy distribution of color selectivity via computational modeling. ... Our model of the early visual system consists of multiple topographically-arranged layers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, with sparse intra-layer connectivity and feed-forward connectivity between layers. Layers are arranged based on anatomy of early visual pathways, and include a retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and layered neocortex. ... After training with natural images, the neurons display heightened sensitivity to specific colors. ..."
Simulations of oscillations in piriform cortex (Wilson & Bower 1992)
"1. A large-scale computer model of the piriform cortex was constructed on the basis of the known anatomic and physiological organization of this region. 2. The oscillatory field potential and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity generated by the model was compared with actual physiological results. The model was able to produce patterns of activity similar to those recorded physiologically in response to both weak and strong electrical shocks to the afferent input. The model also generated activity patterns similar to EEGs recorded in behaving animals. 3. ..."
Sleep-wake transitions in corticothalamic system (Bazhenov et al 2002)
The authors investigate the transition between sleep and awake states with intracellular recordings in cats and computational models. The model describes many essential features of slow wave sleep and activated states as well as the transition between them.
Spatial summation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs in pyramidal neurons (Hao et al. 2010)
"... Based on realistic modeling and experiments in rat hippocampal slices, we derived a simple arithmetic rule for spatial summation of concurrent excitatory glutamatergic inputs (E) and inhibitory GABAergic inputs (I). The somatic response can be well approximated as the sum of the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), the inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP), and a nonlinear term proportional to their product (k*EPSP*IPSP), where the coefficient k reflects the strength of shunting effect. ..."
Spike frequency adaptation in the LGMD (Peron and Gabbiani 2009)
This model is used in the referenced paper to demonstrate that a model of an SK-like calcium-sensitive potassium (KCa) conductance can replicate the spike frequency adaptation (SFA) of the locust lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) neuron. The model simulates current injection experiments with and without KCa block in the LGMD, as well as visual stimulation experiments with and without KCa block.
Spikes,synchrony,and attentive learning by laminar thalamocort. circuits (Grossberg & Versace 2007)
"... The model hereby clarifies, for the first time, how the following levels of brain organization coexist to realize cognitive processing properties that regulate fast learning and stable memory of brain representations: single cell properties, such as spiking dynamics, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), and acetylcholine modulation; detailed laminar thalamic and cortical circuit designs and their interactions; aggregate cell recordings, such as current-source densities and local field potentials; and single cell and large-scale inter-areal oscillations in the gamma and beta frequency domains. ..."
Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
State dependent drug binding to sodium channels in the dentate gyrus (Thomas & Petrou 2013)
A Markov model of sodium channels was developed that includes drug binding to fast inactivated states. This was incorporated into a model of the dentate gyrus to investigate the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on neuron and network properties.
Status epilepticus alters dentate basket cell tonic inhibition (Yu J et al 2013)
Status epilepticus (SE) leads to changes in dentate inhibitory neuronal networks and alters synaptic and tonic inhibition in granule cells. Recently, we identified that one week after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, dentate fast-spiking basket cells (FS-BCs), which underlie fast perisomatic inhibition, show two distinct changes in inhibition: (1) enhanced tonic currents (IGABA) and (2)depolarizing shift in GABA reversal (EGABA) following SE. These two changes can have opposing effects on neuronal inhibition with increases in tonic GABA conductance (gGABA) reducing excitability when the GABA currents are shunting (or hyperpolarizing) and potentially enhancing excitability when GABA currents are depolarizing. The following model is used to examine the post-SE changes in tonic GABA conductance, together with the depolarized GABA reversal potential modify FS-BC excitability and dentate network activity.
STDP promotes synchrony of inhibitory networks in the presence of heterogeneity (Talathi et al 2008)
"Recently Haas et al. (J Neurophysiol 96: 3305–3313, 2006), observed a novel form of spike timing dependent plasticity (iSTDP) in GABAergic synaptic couplings in layer II of the entorhinal cortex. Depending on the relative timings of the presynaptic input at time tpre and the postsynaptic excitation at time tpost, the synapse is strengthened (delta_t = tpost − tpre > 0) or weakened (delta_t < 0). The temporal dynamic range of the observed STDP rule was found to lie in the higher gamma frequency band (≥40 Hz), a frequency range important for several vital neuronal tasks. In this paper we study the function of this novel form of iSTDP in the synchronization of the inhibitory neuronal network. In particular we consider a network of two unidirectionally coupled interneurons (UCI) and two mutually coupled interneurons (MCI), in the presence of heterogeneity in the intrinsic firing rates of each coupled neuron. ..."
Steady-state Vm distribution of neurons subject to synaptic noise (Rudolph, Destexhe 2005)
This package simulates synaptic background activity similar to in vivo measurements using a model of fluctuating synaptic conductances, and compares the simulations with analytic estimates. The steady-state membrane potential (Vm) distribution is calculated numerically and compared with the "extended" analytic expression provided in the reference (see this paper for details).
Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.
Structure-dynamics relationships in bursting neuronal networks revealed (Mäki-Marttunen et al. 2013)
This entry includes tools for generating and analyzing network structure, and for running the neuronal network simulations on them.
Studies of stimulus parameters for seizure disruption using NN simulations (Anderson et al. 2007)
Architecturally realistic neocortical model using seven classes of excitatory and inhibitory single compartment Hodgkin-Huxley cells. Wiring is adapted to minicolumn hypothesis and incorporates visual and neocortical data. Simulation demonstrates spontaneous bursting onset and cessation, and activity can be altered with external electric field.
Surround Suppression in V1 via Withdraw of Balanced Local Excitation in V1 (Shushruth 2012)
The model is mean-field network models, which is set up as a so-called ring-model, i. e. it is a highly idealized model of an orientation hypercolumn in primary visual cortex. Long-range intra-areal and inter-areal feedback connections are modeled phenomenologically as an external input. In this model, there are recurrent interactions via short-range local connections between orientation columns, but not between hypercolumns.
Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
Synaptic information transfer in computer models of neocortical columns (Neymotin et al. 2010)
"... We sought to measure how the activity of the network alters information flow from inputs to output patterns. Information handling by the network reflected the degree of internal connectivity. ... With greater connectivity strength, the recurrent network translated activity and information due to contribution of activity from intrinsic network dynamics. ... At still higher internal synaptic strength, the network corrupted the external information, producing a state where little external information came through. The association of increased information retrieved from the network with increased gamma power supports the notion of gamma oscillations playing a role in information processing."
Synaptic integration in a model of granule cells (Gabbiani et al 1994)
We have developed a compartmental model of a turtle cerebellar granule cell consisting of 13 compartments that represent the soma and 4 dendrites. We used this model to investigate the synaptic integration of mossy fiber inputs in granule cells. See reference or abstract at PubMed link below for more information.
Synaptic integration in tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Larkum et al. 2009)
Simulations used in the paper. Voltage responses to current injections in different tuft locations; NMDA and calcium spike generation. Summation of multiple input distribution.
Synaptic scaling balances learning in a spiking model of neocortex (Rowan & Neymotin 2013)
Learning in the brain requires complementary mechanisms: potentiation and activity-dependent homeostatic scaling. We introduce synaptic scaling to a biologically-realistic spiking model of neocortex which can learn changes in oscillatory rhythms using STDP, and show that scaling is necessary to balance both positive and negative changes in input from potentiation and atrophy. We discuss some of the issues that arise when considering synaptic scaling in such a model, and show that scaling regulates activity whilst allowing learning to remain unaltered.
Synchrony by synapse location (McTavish et al. 2012)
This model considers synchrony between mitral cells induced via shared granule cell interneurons while taking into account the spatial constraints of the system. In particular, since inhibitory inputs decay passively along the lateral dendrites, this model demonstrates that an optimal arrangement of the inhibitory synapses will be near the cell bodies of the relevant mitral cells.
Synthesis of spatial tuning functions from theta cell spike trains (Welday et al., 2011)
A single compartment model reproduces the firing rate maps of place, grid, and boundary cells by receiving inhibitory inputs from theta cells. The theta cell spike trains are modulated by the rat's movement velocity in such a way that phase interference among their burst pattern creates spatial envelope function which simulate the firing rate maps.
Temporal integration by stochastic recurrent network (Okamoto et al. 2007)
"Temporal integration of externally or internally driven information is required for a variety of cognitive processes. This computation is generally linked with graded rate changes in cortical neurons, which typically appear during a delay period of cognitive task in the prefrontal and other cortical areas. Here, we present a neural network model to produce graded (climbing or descending) neuronal activity. Model neurons are interconnected randomly by AMPA-receptor–mediated fast excitatory synapses and are subject to noisy background excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. In each neuron, a prolonged afterdepolarizing potential follows every spike generation. Then, driven by an external input, the individual neurons display bimodal rate changes between a baseline state and an elevated firing state, with the latter being sustained by regenerated afterdepolarizing potentials. ..."
Thalamic neuron, zebra finch DLM: Integration of pallidal and cortical inputs (Goldberg et al. 2012)
This is a single-compartment model of a zebra finch thalamic relay neuron from nucleus DLM. It is used to explore the interaction between cortex-like glutamatergic input and pallidum-like GABAergic input as they control the spiking output of these neurons.
Thalamic quiescence of spike and wave seizures (Lytton et al 1997)
A phase plane analysis of a two cell interaction between a thalamocortical neuron (TC) and a thalamic reticularis neuron (RE).
Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1994)
Demo for simulating networks of thalamic reticular neurons (reproduces figures from Destexhe A et al 1994)
Thalamic transformation of pallidal input (Hadipour-Niktarash 2006)
"In Parkinson’s disease, neurons of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) display the low-frequency tremor-related oscillations. These oscillatory activities are transmitted to the thalamic relay nuclei. Computer models of the interacting thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons were used to explore how the TC-RE network processes the low-frequency oscillations of the GPi neurons. ..."
Thalamocortical and Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1996)
NEURON model of oscillations in networks of thalamocortical and thalamic reticular neurons in the ferret. (more applications for a model quantitatively identical to previous DLGN model; updated for NEURON v4 and above)
Thalamocortical augmenting response (Bazhenov et al 1998)
In the cortical model, augmenting responses were more powerful in the "input" layer compared with those in the "output" layer. Cortical stimulation of the network model produced augmenting responses in cortical neurons in distant cortical areas through corticothalamocortical loops and low-threshold intrathalamic augmentation. ... The predictions of the model were compared with in vivo recordings from neurons in cortical area 4 and thalamic ventrolateral nucleus of anesthetized cats. The known intrinsic properties of thalamic cells and thalamocortical interconnections can account for the basic properties of cortical augmenting responses. See reference for details. NEURON implementation note: cortical SU cells are getting slightly too little stimulation - reason unknown.
Thalamocortical model of spike and wave seizures (Suffczynski et al. 2004)
SIMULINK macroscopic model of transitions between normal (spindle) activity and spike and wave (SW) discharges in the thalamocortical network. The model exhibits bistability properties and stochastic fluctuations present in the network may flip the system between the two operational states. The predictions of the model were compared with real EEG data in rats and humans. A possibility to abort an ictal state by a single counter stimulus is suggested by the model.
Theta phase precession in a model CA3 place cell (Baker and Olds 2007)
"... The present study concerns a neurobiologically based computational model of the emergence of theta phase precession in which the responses of a single model CA3 pyramidal cell are examined in the context of stimulation by realistic afferent spike trains including those of place cells in entorhinal cortex, dentate gyrus, and other CA3 pyramidal cells. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the model CA3 pyramidal cell leads to a spatially correlated associational synaptic drive that subsequently creates a spatially asymmetric expansion of the model cell’s place field. ... Through selective manipulations of the model it is possible to decompose theta phase precession in CA3 into the separate contributing factors of inheritance from upstream afferents in the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex, the interaction of synaptically controlled increasing afferent drive with phasic inhibition, and the theta phase difference between dentate gyrus granule cell and CA3 pyramidal cell activity."
Turtle visual cortex model (Nenadic et al. 2003, Wang et al. 2005, Wang et al. 2006)
This is a model of the visual cortex of freshwater turtles that is based upon the known anatomy and physiology of individual neurons. The model was published in three papers (Nenadic et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2005; Wang et al., 2006), which should be consulted for full details on its construction. The model has also been used in several papers (Robbins and Senseman, 2004; Du et al., 2005; Du et al., 2006). It is implemented in GENESIS (Bower and Beeman, 1998).


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