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Models that contain the Model Topic : Action Potentials

(A cycle of charging (or discharging) of an electrically excitable cell or group of cells. Different types of ions (charged atoms) move across the membranes as channels and receptors (pores) open or close in response to changes in the voltage or ligands.)

   Models   Description
3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 and the NEURON code of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
A cardiac cell simulator (Puglisi and Bers 2001), applied to the QT interval (Busjahn et al 2004)
"LabHEART is an easy to use program that simulates the cardiac action potential, calcium transient and ionic currents. Key parameters such as ionic concentration, stimulus waveform and channel conductance can easily be changed by a click on an icon or dragging a slider. It is a powerfull tool for teaching and researching cardiac electrophysiology."
A detailed and fast model of extracellular recordings (Camunas-Mesa & Qurioga 2013)
"We present a novel method to generate realistic simulations of extracellular recordings. The simulations were obtained by superimposing the activity of neurons placed randomly in a cube of brain tissue. Detailed models of individual neurons were used to reproduce the extracellular action potentials of close-by neurons. ..."
A dynamic model of the canine ventricular myocyte (Hund, Rudy 2004)
The Hund-Rudy dynamic (HRd) model is based on data from the canine epicardial ventricular myocyte. Rate-dependent phenomena associated with ion channel kinetics, action potential properties and Ca2+ handling are simulated by the model. See paper for more and details.
A Fast Rhythmic Bursting Cell: in vivo cell modeling (Lee 2007)
One of the cellular mechanisms underlying the generation of gamma oscillations is a type of cortical pyramidal neuron named fast rhythmic bursting (FRB) cells. After cells from cats' primary visual cortices were filled with Neurobiotin, the brains were cut, and the cells were photographed. One FRB cell was chosen to be confocaled, reconstructed with Neurolucida software, and generated a detailed multi-compartmental model in the NEURON program. We explore firing properties of FRB cells and the role of enhanced Na+ conductance.
A model for interaural time difference sensitivity in the medial superior olive (Zhou et al 2005)
This model simulates responses of neurons to interaural time difference (ITD) in the medial superior olive (MSO) of the mammalian brainstem. The model has a bipolar cell structure and incorporates two anatomic observations in the MSO: (1) the axon arises from the dendrite that receives ipsilateral inputs and (2) inhibitory synapses are located primarily on the soma in adult animals. Fine adjustment of the best ITD is achieved by the interplay of somatic sodium currents and synaptic inhibitory currents. The model suggests a mechanism for dynamically "fine-tuning" the ITD sensitivity of MSO cells by the opponency between depolarizing sodium currents and hyperpolarizing inhibitory currents.
A model for pituitary GH(3) lactotroph (Wu and Chang 2005)
The ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels are composed of sulfonylurea receptor and inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (Kir6.2) subunit. These channels are regulated by intracellular ADP/ATP ratio and play a role in cellular metabolism. ... The objective of this study was to determine whether Diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) modifies K(ATP)-channel activity in pituitary GH(3) cells. ... Simulation studies also demonstrated that the increased conductance of K(ATP)-channels used to mimic DEPC actions reduced the frequency of spontaneous action potentials and fluctuation of intracellular Ca(2+). The results indicate that chemical modification with DEPC enhances K(ATP)-channel activity and influences functional activities of pituitary GH(3) cells. See paper for more and details.
A Model of Multiple Spike Initiation Zones in the Leech C-interneuron (Crisp 2009)
The leech C-interneuron and its electrical synapse with the S-interneuron exhibit unusual properties: an asymmetric delay when impulses travel from one soma to the other, and graded C-interneuron impulse amplitudes under elevated divalent cation concentrations. These properties have been simulated using a SNNAP model in which the C-interneuron has multiple, independent spike initiation zones associated with individual electrical junctions with the C-interneuron.
A multiphysics neuron model for cellular volume dynamics (Lee et al. 2011)
This paper introduces a novel neuron model, where the cell volume is a time-varying variable and multiple physical principles are combined to build governing equations. Using this model, we analyzed neuronal volume responses during excitation, which elucidated the waveforms of fast intrinsic optical signals observed experimentally across the literature. In addition, we analyzed volume responses on a longer time scale with repetitive stimulation to study the characteristics of slow cell swelling.
A set of reduced models of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Bahl et al. 2012)
These are the NEURON files for 10 different models of a reduced L5 pyramidal neuron. The parameters were obtained by automatically fitting the models to experimental data using a multi objective evolutionary search strategy. Details on the algorithm can be found at www.g-node.org/emoo and in Bahl et al. (2012).
A simple integrative electrophysiological model of bursting GnRH neurons (Csercsik et al. 2011)
In this paper a modular model of the GnRH neuron is presented. For the aim of simplicity, the currents corresponding to fast time scales and action potential generation are described by an impulsive system, while the slower currents and calcium dynamics are described by usual ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The model is able to reproduce the depolarizing afterpotentials, afterhyperpolarization, periodic bursting behavior and the corresponding calcium transients observed in the case of GnRH neurons.
A simplified cerebellar Purkinje neuron (the PPR model) (Brown et al. 2011)
These models were implemented in NEURON by Sherry-Ann Brown in the laboratory of Leslie M. Loew. The files reproduce Figures 2c-f from Brown et al, 2011 "Virtual NEURON: a Strategy For Merged Biochemical and Electrophysiological Modeling".
A threshold equation for action potential initiation (Platkiewicz & Brette 2010)
"We examined in models the influence of Na channel activation, inactivation, slow voltage-gated channels and synaptic conductances on spike threshold. We propose a threshold equation which quantifies the contribution of all these mechanisms. It provides an instantaneous time-varying value of the threshold, which applies to neurons with fluctuating inputs. ... We find that spike threshold depends logarithmically on Na channel density, and that Na channel inactivation and K channels can dynamically modulate it in an adaptive way: the threshold increases with membrane potential and after every action potential. " See paper for more.
Action Potential initiation and backpropagation in Neocortical L5 Pyramidal Neuron (Hu et al. 2009)
"...Previous computational studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the role of Na+ channel density and biophysical properties in action potential initiation as a result of inconsistent estimates of channel density. Our modeling studies integrated the immunostaining and electrophysiological results and showed that the lowest threshold for action potential initiation at the distal AIS was largely determined by the density of low-threshold Nav1.6 channels ... Distinct from the function of Nav1.6 channel, the Nav1.2 channel may control action potential backpropagation because of its high density at the proximal AIS and high threshold. ... In conclusion, distal AIS accumulation of Nav1.6 channels determines the low threshold for action potential initiation; whereas proximal AIS accumulation of Nav1.2 channels sets the threshold for the generation of somatodendritic potentials and ensures action potential backpropagation to the soma and dendrites. Thus, Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 channels serve distinct functions in action potential initiation and backpropagation."
Action potential of adult rat ventricle (Wang et al. 2008)
"Aconitine (ACO), a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid, is recognized to have effects on cardiac voltage-gated Na(+) channels. However, it remains unknown whether it has any effects on K(+) currents. The effects of ACO on ion currents in differentiated clonal cardiac (H9c2) cells and in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were investigated in this study. ..." The rat action potential in this simulation was played back into the cell for experiments reported in this paper.
Action potential of striated muscel fiber (Adrian et al 1970)
1. Membrane currents during step depolarizations were determined by a method in which three electrodes were inserted near the end of a fibre in the frog's sartorius muscle. The theoretical basis and limitations of the method are discussed. 2. Measurements of the membrane capacity (CM) and resting resistance (RM) derived from the current during a step change in membrane potential are consistent with values found by other methods. 3. In fibres made mechanically inactive with hypertonic solutions (Ringer solution plus 350 mM sucrose) step depolarizations produced ionic currents which resembled those of nerve in showing (a) an early transient inward current, abolished by tetrodotoxin, which reversed when the depolarization was carried beyond an internal potential of about +20 mV, (b) a delayed outward current, with a linear instantaneous current¡Xvoltage relation, and a mean equilibrium potential with a normal potassium concentration (2¡P5 mM) of -85 mV. 4. The reversal potential for the early current appears to be consistent with the sodium equilibrium potential expected in hypertonic solutions. 5. The variation of the equilibrium potential for the delayed current (V¡¬K) with external potassium concentration suggests that the channel for delayed current has a ratio of potassium to sodium permeability of 30:1; this is less than the resting membrane where the ratio appears to be 100:1. V¡¬K corresponds well with the membrane potential at the beginning of the negative after-potential observed under similar conditions. 6. The variation of V¡¬K with the amount of current which has passed through the delayed channel suggests that potassium ions accumulate in a space of between 1/3 and 1/6 of the fibre volume. If potassium accumulates in the transverse tubular system (T system) much greater variation in V¡¬K would be expected. 7. The delayed current is not maintained but is inactivated like the early current. The inactivation is approximately exponential with a time constant of 0¡P5 to 1 sec at 20¢X C. The steady-state inactivation of the potassium current is similar to that for the sodium current, but its voltage dependence is less steep and the potential for half inactivation is 20 mV rate more positive. 8. Reconstructions of ionic currents were made in terms of the parameters (m, n, h) of the Hodgkin¡XHuxley model for the squid axon, using constants which showed a similar dependence on voltage. 9. Propagated action potentials and conduction velocities were computed for various conditions on the assumption that the T system behaves as if it were a series resistance and capacity in parallel with surface capacity and the channels for sodium, potassium and leak current. There was reasonable agreement with observed values, the main difference being that the calculated velocities and rates of rise were somewhat less than those observed experimentally.
Action potential reconstitution from measured current waveforms (Alle et al. 2009)
This NEURON code reconstitutes action potentials in a model of a hippocampal mossy fiber from experimentally measured sodium, potassium and calcium current waveforms as described in Alle et al. (2009).
Action potential-evoked Na+ influx are similar in axon and soma (Fleidervish et al. 2010)
"In cortical pyramidal neurons, the axon initial segment (AIS) is pivotal in synaptic integration. It has been asserted that this is because there is a high density of Na+ channels in the AIS. However, we found that action potential–associated Na+ flux, as measured by high-speed fluorescence Na+ imaging, was about threefold larger in the rat AIS than in the soma. Spike-evoked Na+ flux in the AIS and the first node of Ranvier was similar and was eightfold lower in basal dendrites. ... In computer simulations, these data were consistent with the known features of action potential generation in these neurons."
Active dendrites and spike propagation in a hippocampal interneuron (Saraga et al 2003)
We create multi-compartment models of an Oriens-Lacunosum/Moleculare (O-LM) hippocampal interneuron using passive properties, channel kinetics, densities and distributions specific to this cell type, and explore its signaling characteristics. We find that spike initiation depends on both location and amount of input, as well as the intrinsic properties of the interneuron. Distal synaptic input always produces strong back-propagating spikes whereas proximal input could produce both forward and back-propagating spikes depending on the input strength. Please see paper for more details. Fernanda.Saraga@utoronto.ca
Active dendritic action potential propagation (Casale & McCormick 2011)
This model explores the dendritic sodium and potassium conductances needed to recapitulate voltage-sensitive dye optical recordings of thalamic interneuron dendrites in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. Model ion channels were selected based on pharmacological data.
Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network (Casellato et al. 2014)
" ... We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. ..."
Amyloid beta (IA block) effects on a model CA1 pyramidal cell (Morse et al. 2010)
The model simulations provide evidence oblique dendrites in CA1 pyramidal neurons are susceptible to hyper-excitability by amyloid beta block of the transient K+ channel, IA. See paper for details.
An integrative model of the cardiac ventricular myocytes (Greenstein and Winslow 2002)
The local control theory of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in cardiac muscle asserts that L-type Ca2+ current tightly controls Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via local interaction of closely apposed L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). ...In this study we present a biophysically detailed model of the normal canine ventricular myocyte that conforms to local control theory. The model formulation incorporates details of microscopic EC coupling properties in the form of Ca2+ release units (CaRUs) in which individual sarcolemmal LCCs interact in a stochastic manner with nearby RyRs in localized regions ... See paper for more and details.
AP back-prop. explains threshold variability and rapid rise (McCormick et al. 2007, Yu et al. 2008)
This simple axon-soma model explained how the rapid rising phase in the somatic spike is derived from the propagated axon initiated spike, and how the somatic spike threshold variance is affected by spike propagation.
AP initiation and propagation in type II cochlear ganglion cell (Hossain et al 2005)
The model of type II cochlear ganglion cell was based on the immunostaining of the mouse auditory pathway. Specific antibodies were used to map the distribution of voltage-dependent sodium channels along the two unmyelinated axon-like processes of the bipolar ganglion cells. Three distinct hot spots were detected. A high density of sodium channels was present over the entire trajectory of sensory endings beneath the outer hair cells (the most distal portion of the peripheral axon). THE other two hot spots were localized in the initial segments of both of the axons that flank the unmyelinated bipolar ganglion cell bodies.

A biophysical model indicates that all three hot spots might play important roles in action potential initiation and propagation. For instance, the hot spot in the receptor segment is important for transforming the receptor potentials into a full blown action potential (Supplemental Fig. 1). The hot spots in the two paraganglionic axon initial segments are there to ensure the successful propagation of action potentials from the peripheral to the central axon through the cell body.

The Readme.txt file provides step by step instructions on how to recreate Figures 6 and 7 of Hossain et al., 2005 paper.

Artificial neuron model (Izhikevich 2003)
A model is presented that reproduces spiking and bursting behavior of known types of cortical neurons. The model combines the biologically plausibility of Hodgkin–Huxley-type dynamics and the computational efficiency of integrate-and-fire neurons. Using this model, one can simulate tens of thousands of spiking cortical neurons in real time (1 ms resolution) using a desktop PC.
Axonal NaV1.6 Sodium Channels in AP Initiation of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons (Royeck et al. 2008)
"... We show that the Na+ channel NaV1.6 displays a striking aggregation at the AIS of cortical neurons. ... In combination with simulations using a realistic computer model of a CA1 pyramidal cell, our results imply that a hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of activation of AIS NaV1.6 channels is important both in determining spike threshold and localizing spike initiation to the AIS. ... These results suggest that NaV1.6 subunits at the AIS contribute significantly to its role as spike trigger zone and shape repetitive discharge properties of CA1 neurons."
Biophysically detailed model of the mouse sino-atrial node cell (Kharche et al. 2011)
This model is developed to study the role of various electrophysiological mechanisms in generating cardiac pacemaking action potentials (APs).The model incorporates membrane ionic currents and intracellular mechanisms contributing to spontaneous mouse SAN APs. The model was validated by testing the functional roles of individual membrane currents in one and multiple parameter analyses.The roles of intracellular Ca2+-handling mechanisms on cardiac pacemaking were also investigated in the model.
Boundary effects influence velocity in transverse propagation of cardiac APs (Sperelakis et al 2005)
... earlier experiments were carried out with 2-dimensional sheets of cells: 2 × 3, 3 × 4, and 5 × 5 models (where the first number is the number of parallel chains and the second is the number of cells in each chain). The purpose of the present study was to enlarge the model size to 7 × 7, thus enabling the transverse velocities to be compared in models of different sizes (where all circuit parameters are identical in all models). This procedure should enable the significance of the role of edge (boundary) effects in transverse propagation to be determined. See paper for more and details.
Breakdown of accmmodation in nerve: a possible role for INAp (Hennings et al 2005)
The present modeling study suggests that persistent, low-threshold, rapidly activating sodium currents have a key role in breakdown of accommodation, and that breakdown of accommodation can be used as a tool for studying persistent sodium current under normal and pathological conditions. See paper for more and details.
Burst induced synaptic plasticity in Apysia sensorimotor neurons (Phares et al 2003)
The Aplysia sensorimotor synapse is a key site of plasticity for several simple forms of learning. Intracellular stimulation of sensory neurons to fire a burst of action potentials at 10 Hz for 1 sec led to significant homosynaptic depression of postsynaptic responses. During the burst, the steady-state depressed phase of the postsynaptic response, which was only 20% of the initial EPSP of the burst, still contributed to firing the motor neuron. To explore the functional contribution of transient homosynaptic depression to the response of the motor neuron, computer simulations of the sensorimotor synapse with and without depression were compared. Depression allowed the motor neuron to produce graded responses over a wide range of presynaptic input strength. Thus, synaptic depression increased the dynamic range of the sensorimotor synapse and can, in principle, have a profound effect on information processing. Please see paper for results and details.
Bursting and oscillations in RD1 Retina driven by AII Amacrine Neuron (Choi et al. 2014)
CA1 oriens alveus interneurons: signaling properties (Minneci et al. 2007)
The model supports the experimental findings showing that the dynamic interaction between cells with various firing patterns could differently affect GABAergic signaling, leading to a wide range of interneuronal communication within the hippocampal network.
CA1 pyramidal cell: reconstructed axonal arbor and failures at weak gap junctions (Vladimirov 2011)
Model of pyramidal CA1 cells connected by gap junctions in their axons. Cell geometry is based on anatomical reconstruction of rat CA1 cell (NeuroMorpho.Org ID: NMO_00927) with long axonal arbor. Model init_2cells.hoc shows failures of second spike propagation in a spike doublet, depending on conductance of an axonal gap junction. Model init_ring.hoc shows that spike failure result in reentrant oscillations of a spike in a loop of axons connected by gap junctions, where one gap junction is weak. The paper shows that in random networks of axons connected by gap junctions, oscillations are driven by single pacemaker loop of axons. The shortest loop, around which a spike can travel, is the most likely pacemaker. This principle allows us to predict the frequency of oscillations from network connectivity and visa versa. We propose that this type of oscillations corresponds to so-called fast ripples in epileptic hippocampus.
CA1 pyramidal neuron (Migliore et al 1999)
Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron model from the paper M.Migliore, D.A Hoffman, J.C. Magee and D. Johnston (1999) Role of an A-type K+ conductance in the back-propagation of action potentials in the dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, J. Comput. Neurosci. 7, 5-15. Instructions are provided in the below README file.Contact michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: as a 2-layer NN and subthreshold synaptic summation (Poirazi et al 2003)
We developed a CA1 pyramidal cell model calibrated with a broad spectrum of in vitro data. Using simultaneous dendritic and somatic recordings, and combining results for two different response measures (peak vs. mean EPSP), two different stimulus formats (single shock vs. 50 Hz trains), and two different spatial integration conditions (within vs. between-branch summation), we found the cell's subthreshold responses to paired inputs are best described as a sum of nonlinear subunit responses, where the subunits correspond to different dendritic branches. In addition to suggesting a new type of experiment and providing testable predictions, our model shows how conclusions regarding synaptic arithmetic can be influenced by an array of seemingly innocuous experimental design choices.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: conditional boosting of dendritic APs (Watanabe et al 2002)
Model files from the paper Watanabe S, Hoffman DA, Migliore M, Johnston D (2002). The experimental and modeling results support the hypothesis that dendritic K-A channels and the boosting of back-propagating action potentials contribute to the induction of LTP in CA1 neurons. See the paper for details. Questions about the model may be addressed to Michele Migliore: michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it
CA1 pyramidal neuron: dendritic spike initiation (Gasparini et al 2004)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Sonia Gasparini, Michele Migliore, and Jeffrey C. Magee On the initiation and propagation of dendritic spikes in CA1 pyramidal neurons, J. Neurosci., J. Neurosci. 24:11046-11056 (2004).
CA1 pyramidal neuron: effects of Ih on distal inputs (Migliore et al 2004)
NEURON mod files from the paper: M. Migliore, L. Messineo, M. Ferrante Dendritic Ih selectively blocks temporal summation of unsynchronized distal inputs in CA1 pyramidal neurons, J.Comput. Neurosci. 16:5-13 (2004). The model demonstrates how the dendritic Ih in pyramidal neurons could selectively suppress AP generation for a volley of excitatory afferents when they are asynchronously and distally activated.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: effects of Lamotrigine on dendritic excitability (Poolos et al 2002)
NEURON mod files from N. Poolos, M. Migliore, and D. Johnston, Nature Neuroscience (2002). The experimental and modeling results in this paper demonstrate for the first time that neuronal excitability can be altered by pharmaceuticals acting selectively on dendrites, and suggest an important role for Ih in controlling dendritic excitability and epileptogenesis.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: effects of R213Q and R312W Kv7.2 mutations (Miceli et al. 2013)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Miceli et al, Genotype–phenotype correlations in neonatal epilepsies caused by mutations in the voltage sensor of Kv7.2 potassium channel subunits, PNAS 2013 Feb 25. [Epub ahead of print] In this paper, functional studies revealed that in homomeric or heteromeric configuration with KV7.2 and/or KV7.3 subunits, R213W and R213Q mutations markedly destabilized the open state, causing a dramatic decrease in channel voltage sensitivity. Modeling these channels in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells revealed that both mutations increased cell firing frequency, with the R213Q mutation prompting more dramatic functional changes compared with the R213W mutation.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: functional significance of axonal Kv7 channels (Shah et al. 2008)
The model used in this paper confirmed the experimental findings suggesting that axonal Kv7 channels are critically and uniquely required for determining the inherent spontaneous firing of hippocampal CA1 pyramids, independently of alterations in synaptic activity. The model predicts that the axonal Kv7 density could be 3-5 times that at the soma.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: integration of subthreshold inputs from PP and SC (Migliore 2003)
The model shows how the experimentally observed increase in the dendritic density of Ih and IA could have a major role in constraining the temporal integration window for the main CA1 synaptic inputs.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: rebound spiking (Ascoli et al.2010)
The model demonstrates that CA1 pyramidal neurons support rebound spikes mediated by hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih), and normally masked by A-type potassium channels (KA). Partial KA reduction confined to one or few branches of the apical tuft may be sufficient to elicit a local spike following a train of synaptic inhibition. These data suggest that the plastic regulation of KA can provide a dynamic switch to unmask post-inhibitory spiking in CA1 pyramidal neurons, further increasing the signal processing power of the CA1 synaptic microcircuitry.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: schizophrenic behavior (Migliore et al. 2011)
NEURON files from the paper: A modeling study suggesting how a reduction in the context-dependent input on CA1 pyramidal neurons could generate schizophrenic behavior. by M. Migliore, I. De Blasi, D. Tegolo, R. Migliore, Neural Networks,(2011), doi:10.1016/j.neunet.2011.01.001. Starting from the experimentally supported assumption on hippocampal neurons we explore an experimentally testable prediction at the single neuron level. The model shows how and to what extent a pathological hypofunction of a contextdependent distal input on a CA1 neuron can generate hallucinations by altering the normal recall of objects on which the neuron has been previously tuned. The results suggest that a change in the context during the recall phase may cause an occasional but very significant change in the set of active dendrites used for features recognition, leading to a distorted perception of objects.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: signal propagation in oblique dendrites (Migliore et al 2005)
NEURON mod files from the paper: M. Migliore, M. Ferrante, GA Ascoli (2005). The model shows how the back- and forward propagation of action potentials in the oblique dendrites of CA1 neurons could be modulated by local properties such as morphology or active conductances.
CA1 Pyramidal Neuron: slow Na+ inactivation (Migliore 1996)
Model files from the paper: M. Migliore, Modeling the attenuation and failure of action potentials in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons, Biophys. J. 71:2394-403 (1996). Please see the below readme file for installation and use instructions. Contact michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: synaptically-induced bAP predicts synapse location (Sterratt et al. 2012)
This is an adaptation of Poirazi et al.'s (2003) CA1 model that is used to measure BAP-induced voltage and calcium signals in spines after simulated Schaffer collateral synapse stimulation. In the model, the peak calcium concentration is highly correlated with soma-synapse distance under a number of physiologically-realistic suprathreshold stimulation regimes and for a range of dendritic morphologies. There are also simulations demonstrating that peak calcium can be used to set up a synaptic democracy in a homeostatic manner, whereby synapses regulate their synaptic strength on the basis of the difference between peak calcium and a uniform target value.
CA1 pyramidal neurons: binding properties and the magical number 7 (Migliore et al. 2008)
NEURON files from the paper: Single neuron binding properties and the magical number 7, by M. Migliore, G. Novara, D. Tegolo, Hippocampus, in press (2008). In an extensive series of simulations with realistic morphologies and active properties, we demonstrate how n radial (oblique) dendrites of these neurons may be used to bind n inputs to generate an output signal. The results suggest a possible neural code as the most effective n-ple of dendrites that can be used for short-term memory recollection of persons, objects, or places. Our analysis predicts a straightforward physiological explanation for the observed puzzling limit of about 7 short-term memory items that can be stored by humans.
CA1 pyramidal neurons: effect of external electric field from power lines (Cavarretta et al. 2014)
The paper discusses the effects induced by an electric field at power lines frequency.
CA1 pyramidal neurons: effects of a Kv7.2 mutation (Miceli et al. 2009)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Miceli et al, Neutralization of a unique, negatively-charged residue in the voltage sensor of K(V)7.2 subunits in a sporadic case of benign familial neonatal seizures, Neurobiol Dis., in press (2009). In this paper, the model revealed that the gating changes introduced by a mutation in K(v)7.2 genes encoding for the neuronal KM current in a case of benign familial neonatal seizures, increased cell firing frequency, thereby triggering the neuronal hyperexcitability which underlies the observed neonatal epileptic condition.
CA1 pyramidal neurons: effects of Alzheimer (Culmone and Migliore 2012)
The model predicts possible therapeutic treatments of Alzheimers's Disease in terms of pharmacological manipulations of channels' kinetic and activation properties. The results suggest how and which mechanism can be targeted by a drug to restore the original firing conditions. The simulations reproduce somatic membrane potential in control conditions, when 90% of membrane is affected by AD (Fig.4A of the paper), and after treatment (Fig.4B of the paper).
CA1 stratum radiatum interneuron multicompartmental model (Katona et al. 2011)
The model examines dendritic NMDA-spike generation and propagation in the dendrites of CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons. It contains NMDA-channels in a clustered pattern on a dendrite and K-channels. The simulation shows the whole NMDA spike and the rising phase of the traces in separate windows.
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Lazarewicz et al 2002)
The model shows how using a CA1-like distribution of active dendritic conductances in a CA3 morphology results in dendritic initiation of spikes during a burst.
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Safiulina et al. 2010)
In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. To compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in postnatal development, a realistic model was constructed taking into account the different biophysical properties of these synapses.
CA3 pyramidal neuron: firing properties (Hemond et al. 2008)
In the paper, this model was used to identify how relative differences in K+ conductances, specifically KC, KM, & KD, between cells contribute to the different characteristics of the three types of firing patterns observed experimentally.
Caffeine-induced electrical oscillations in Aplysia neurons (Komendantov, Kononenko 2000)
It has been found that in cultured Aplysia neurons bath applications of 40 mM cafffeine evokes oscillations of the membrane potential with about a 40 mV amplitude with a frequency of 0.2 to 0.5 Hz. The most probable mechanism of these caffeine-induced oscillations is inhibition of voltage-activated outward potassium current and, as can be seen from our mathematical modeling, slowdown of inactivation of inward sodium current. It seems likely that these oscillations have a purely membrane origin. Please see paper for results and details.
Calcium and potassium currents of olfactory bulb juxtaglomerular cells (Masurkar and Chen 2011)
Inward and outward currents of the olfactory bulb juxtaglomerular cells are characterized in the experiments and modeling in these two Masurkar and Chen 2011 papers.
Calcium spikes in basal dendrites (Kampa and Stuart 2006)
This model was published in Kampa & Stuart (2006) J Neurosci 26(28):7424-32. The simulation creates two plots showing voltage and calcium changes in basal dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons during action potential backpropagation. created by B. Kampa (2006)
Cancelling redundant input in ELL pyramidal cells (Bol et al. 2011)
The paper investigates the property of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of the brain of weakly electric fish to cancel predictable stimuli. Electroreceptors on the skin encode all signals in their firing activity, but superficial pyramidal (SP) cells in the ELL that receive this feedforward input do not respond to constant sinusoidal signals. This cancellation putatively occurs using a network of feedback delay lines and burst-induced synaptic plasticity between the delay lines and the SP cell that learns to cancel the redundant input. Biologically, the delay lines are parallel fibres from cerebellar-like granule cells in the eminentia granularis posterior. A model of this network (e.g. electroreceptors, SP cells, delay lines and burst-induced plasticity) was constructed to test whether the current knowledge of how the network operates is sufficient to cancel redundant stimuli.
Cardiac action potential based on Luo-Rudy phase 1 model (Luo and Rudy 1991), (Wu 2004)
A mathematical model of the membrane action potential of the mammalian ventricular cell is introduced. The model is based, whenever possible, on recent single-cell and single-channel data and incorporates the possibility of changing extracellular potassium concentration [K]o. The fast sodium current, INa, is characterized by fast upstroke velocity (Vmax = 400 V/sec) and slow recovery from inactivation. The time-independent potassium current, IK1, includes a negative-slope phase and displays significant crossover phenomenon as [K]o is varied. The time-dependent potassium current, IK, shows only a minimal degree of crossover. A novel potassium current that activates at plateau potentials is included in the model. The simulated action potential duplicates the experimentally observed effects of changes in [K]o on action potential duration and rest potential. See papers for more and details.
Cardiac action potentials and pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (DiFrancesco & Noble 1985)
"Equations have been developed to describe cardiac action potentials and pacemaker activity. The model takes account of extensive developments in experimental work ..."
Cardiac Atrial Cell (Courtemanche et al 1998)
Marc Courtemanche, Rafael J. Ramirez, and Stanley Nattel. Ionic mechanisms underlying human atrial action potential properties insights from a mathematical model Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 1998 275: H301-H321. The implementation of this model in NEURON was contributed by Ingemar Jacobson.
Cardiac Atrial Cell (Courtemanche et al 1998) (C++)
The mechanisms underlying many important properties of the human atrial action potential (AP) are poorly understood. Using specific formulations of the K+, Na+, and Ca2+ currents based on data recorded from human atrial myocytes, along with representations of pump, exchange, and background currents, we developed a mathematical model of the AP. The model AP resembles APs recorded from human atrial samples and responds to rate changes, L-type Ca2+ current blockade, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger inhibition, and variations in transient outward current amplitude in a fashion similar to experimental recordings. Rate-dependent adaptation of AP duration, an important determinant of susceptibility to atrial fibrillation, was attributable to incomplete L-type Ca2+ current recovery from inactivation and incomplete delayed rectifier current deactivation at rapid rates. Experimental observations of variable AP morphology could be accounted for by changes in transient outward current density, as suggested experimentally. We conclude that this mathematical model of the human atrial AP reproduces a variety of observed AP behaviors and provides insights into the mechanisms of clinically important AP properties.
Cerebellar cortex oscil. robustness from Golgi cell gap jncs (Simoes de Souza and De Schutter 2011)
" ... Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. ..."
Cerebellar purkinje cell (De Schutter and Bower 1994)
Tutorial simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell. This tutorial is based upon a GENESIS simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell, modeled and fine-tuned by Erik de Schutter. The tutorial assumes that you have a basic knowledge of the Purkinje cell and its synaptic inputs. It gives visual insight in how different properties as concentrations and channel conductances vary and interact within a real Purkinje cell.
Cerebellar purkinje cell: interacting Kv3 and Na currents influence firing (Akemann, Knopfel 2006)
Purkinje neurons spontaneously generate action potentials in the absence of synaptic drive and thereby exert a tonic, yet plastic, input to their target cells in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Purkinje neurons express two ionic currents with biophysical properties that are specialized for high-frequency firing: resurgent sodium currents and potassium currents mediated by Kv3.3. … Numerical simulations indicated that Kv3.3 increases the spontaneous firing rate via cooperation with resurgent sodium currents. We conclude that the rate of spontaneous action potential firing of Purkinje neurons is controlled by the interaction of Kv3.3 potassium currents and resurgent sodium currents. See paper for more and details.
Cerebellar purkinje cell: K and Ca channels regulate APs (Miyasho et al 2001)
We adopted De Schutter and Bower's model as the starting point, then modified the descriptions of several ion channels, such as the P-type Ca channel and the delayed rectifier K channel, and added class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels to the model. Our new model reproduces most of our experimental results and supports the conclusions of our experimental study that class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels are present and functioning in the dendrites of Purkinje neurons.
Cerebellar Purkinje Cell: resurgent Na current and high frequency firing (Khaliq et al 2003)
These mod files supplied by Dr Raman are for the below two references. ... we modeled action potential firing by simulating eight currents directly recorded from Purkinje cells in both wild-type and (mutant) med mice. Regular, high-frequency firing was slowed in med Purkinje neurons. In addition to disrupted sodium currents, med neurons had small but significant changes in potassium and leak currents. Simulations indicated that these modified non-sodium currents could not account for the reduced excitability of med cells but instead slightly facilitated spiking. The loss of NaV1.6-specific kinetics, however, slowed simulated spontaneous activity. Together, the data suggest that across a range of conditions, sodium currents with a resurgent component promote and accelerate firing. See papers for more and details.
CN bushy, stellate neurons (Rothman, Manis 2003)
Using kinetic data from three different K+ currents in acutely isolated neurons, a single electrical compartment model representing the soma of a ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neuron was created. The K+ currents include a fast transient current (IA), a slow-inactivating low-threshold current (ILT), and a noninactivating high-threshold current (IHT). The model also includes a fast-inactivating Na+ current, a hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih), and 1-50 auditory nerve synapses. With this model, the role IA, ILT, and IHT play in shaping the discharge patterns of VCN cells is explored. Simulation results indicate these currents have specific roles in shaping the firing patterns of stellate and bushy CN cells. (see readme.txt and the papers, esp 2003c, for details). Any questions regarding these implementations should be directed to: pmanis@med.unc.edu 2 April 2004 Paul B Manis, Ph.D.
CN bushy, stellate neurons (Rothman, Manis 2003) (Brian)
Cochlear neuron model of Rothman & Manis (2003). Adapted from the Neuron implementation.
Comparison of full and reduced globus pallidus models (Hendrickson 2010)
In this paper, we studied what features of realistic full model activity patterns can and cannot be preserved by morphologically reduced models. To this end, we reduced the morphological complexity of a full globus pallidus neuron model possessing active dendrites and compared its spontaneous and driven responses to those of the reduced models.
Compartmental model of a mitral cell (Popovic et al. 2005)
Usage of a morphologically realistic compartmental model of a mitral cell and data obtained from whole-cell patch-clamp and voltage-imaging experiments in order to explore passive parameter space in which reported low EPSP attenuation is observed.
Compartmentalization of GABAergic inhibition by dendritic spines (Chiu et al. 2013)
A spiny dendrite model supports the hypothesis that only inhibitory inputs on spine heads, not shafts, compartmentalizes inhibition of calcium signals to spine heads as seen in paired inhibition with back-propagating action potential experiments on prefrontal cortex layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in mouse (Chiu et al. 2013).
Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
Complex CA1-neuron to study AP initiation (Wimmer et al. 2010)
Complex model of a pyramidal CA1-neuron, adapted from Royeck, M., et al. Role of axonal NaV1.6 sodium channels in action potential initiation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Journal of neurophysiology 100, 2361-2380 (2008). It contains a biophysically realistic morphology comprising 265 compartments (829 segments) and 15 different distributed Ca2+- and/or voltage-dependent conductances.
Computational neuropharmacology of CA1 pyramidal neuron (Ferrante et al. 2008)
In this paper, the model was used to show how neuroactive drugs targeting different neuronal mechanisms affect the signal integration in CA1 pyramidal neuron. Ferrante M, Blackwell KT, Migliore M, Ascoli GA (2008)
Conduction in uniform myelinated axons (Moore et al 1978)
Examines the relative sensitivity of the velocity of impulse propagation to changes in nodal and internodal parameters.
Contribution of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the neuronal network (Huang et al. 2009)
Epileptic seizures in diabetic hyperglycemia (DH) are not uncommon. This study aimed to determine the acute behavioral, pathological, and electrophysiological effects of status epilepticus (SE) on diabetic animals. ... We also used a simulation model to evaluate intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and neuroexcitability. ... In the simulation, increased intracellular ATP concentration promoted action potential firing. This finding that rats with DH had more brain damage after SE than rats without diabetes suggests the importance of intensively treating hyperglycemia and seizures in diabetic patients with epilepsy.
Current flow during PAP in squid axon at diameter change (Joyner et al 1980)
From the paper abstract: An impulse ... sees an increased electrical load at regions of increasing diameter or at branch points with certain morphologies. We present here theoretical and experimental studies on the changes in membrane current and axial current associated with diameter changes. The theoretical studies were done with numerical solutions for cable equations that were generalized to include a varying diameter; the Hodgkin-Huxley equations were used to represent the membrane properties. ... As an action potential approaches a region of increased electrical load, the action potential amplitude and rate of rise decrease, but there is a marked increase in the magnitude of the inward sodium current. ... (See paper for more details.)
D2 dopamine receptor modulation of interneuronal activity (Maurice et al. 2004)
"... Using a combination of electrophysiological, molecular, and computational approaches, the studies reported here show that D2 dopamine receptor modulation of Na+ currents underlying autonomous spiking contributes to a slowing of discharge rate, such as that seen in vivo. Four lines of evidence support this conclusion. ... Fourth, simulation of cholinergic interneuron pacemaking revealed that a modest increase in the entry of Na+ channels into the slow-inactivated state was sufficient to account for the slowing of pacemaker discharge. These studies establish a cellular mechanism linking dopamine and the reduction in striatal cholinergic interneuron activity seen in the initial stages of associative learning." See paper for more and details.
DBS of a multi-compartment model of subthalamic nucleus projection neurons (Miocinovic et al. 2006)
We built a comprehensive computational model of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in parkinsonian macaques to study the effects of stimulation in a controlled environment. The model consisted of three fundamental components: 1) a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical model of the macaque basal ganglia, 2) a finite element model of the DBS electrode and electric field transmitted to the tissue medium, and 3) multicompartment biophysical models of STN projection neurons, GPi fibers of passage, and internal capsule fibers of passage. Populations of neurons were positioned within the 3D anatomical model. Neurons were stimulated with electrode positions and stimulation parameters defined as clinically effective in two parkinsonian monkeys. The model predicted axonal activation of STN neurons and GPi fibers during STN DBS. Model predictions regarding the degree of GPi fiber activation matched well with experimental recordings in both monkeys.
Demyelinated and remyelinating axon conductances (Hines, Shrager 1991)
Hines, Michael and Peter Shrager (1991). A computational test of the requirements for conduction in demyelinated axons. J. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience. 3 81--93.
Dendritic Na inactivation drives a decrease in ISI (Fernandez et al 2005)
We use a combination of dynamical analysis and electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that spike broadening in dendrites is primarily caused by a cumulative inactivation of dendritic Na(+) current. We further show that a reduction in dendritic Na(+) current increases excitability by decreasing the interspike interval (ISI) and promoting burst firing.
Dendritic Na+ spike initiation and backpropagation of APs in active dendrites (Nevian et al. 2007)
NEURON model used to create simulations shown in figure 6 of the paper. The model includes two point processes; one for dendritic spike initiation and the other for somatic action potential generation. The effect of filtering by imperfect recording electrode can be examined in somatic and dendritic locations.
Dendritic signals command firing dynamics in a Cerebellar Purkinje Cell model (Genet et al. 2010)
This model endows the dendrites of a reconstructed Purkinje cells (PC) with the mechanism of Ca-dependent plateau potentials and spikes described in Genet, S., and B. Delord. 2002. A biophysical model of nonlinear dynamics underlying plateau potentials and calcium spikes in Purkinje cell dendrites. J. Neurophysiol. 88:2430–2444). It is a part of a comprehensive mathematical study suggesting that active electric signals in the dendrites of PC command epochs of firing and silencing of the PC soma.
Dendritica (Vetter et al 2001)
Dendritica is a collection of programs for relating dendritic geometry and signal propagation. The programs are based on those used for the simulations described in: Vetter, P., Roth, A. & Hausser, M. (2001) For reprint requests and additional information please contact Dr. M. Hausser, email address: m.hausser@ucl.ac.uk
Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
Dichotomy of action-potential backpropagation in CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites (Golding et al 2001)
From reference below and Corrigendum: J Neurophysiol 87:1a, 2002 (better versions of figures 2, 3, 5 and 7 because of poor print quality in the original article; as of 2/2006, these figures are perfectly fine in the PDF of the original article that is currently available from the publisher's WWW site). Examines the anatomical and biophysical factors that account for the fact that retrograde invasion of spikes into the apical dendritic tree past 300 um succeeds in some CA1 pyramidal neurons but fails in others.
Dopamine-modulated medium spiny neuron, reduced model (Humphries et al. 2009)
We extended Izhikevich's reduced model of the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) to account for dopaminergic modulation of its intrinsic ion channels and synaptic inputs. We tuned our D1 and D2 receptor MSN models using data from a recent (Moyer et al, 2007) large-scale compartmental model. Our new models capture the input-output relationships for both current injection and spiking input with remarkable accuracy, despite the order of magnitude decrease in system size. They also capture the paired pulse facilitation shown by MSNs. Our dopamine models predict that synaptic effects dominate intrinsic effects for all levels of D1 and D2 receptor activation. Our analytical work on these models predicts that the MSN is never bistable. Nonetheless, these MSN models can produce a spontaneously bimodal membrane potential similar to that recently observed in vitro following application of NMDA agonists. We demonstrate that this bimodality is created by modelling the agonist effects as slow, irregular and massive jumps in NMDA conductance and, rather than a form of bistability, is due to the voltage-dependent blockade of NMDA receptors
Dopaminergic cell bursting model (Kuznetsov et al 2006)
Dopaminergic neurons of the midbrain fire spontaneously at rates <10/s and ordinarily will not exceed this range even when driven with somatic current injection. During spontaneous bursting of dopaminergic neurons in vivo, bursts related to reward expectation in behaving animals, and bursts generated by dendritic application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) agonists, transient firing attains rates well above this range. We suggest a way such highfrequency firing may occur in response to dendritic NMDA receptor activation. We have extended the coupled oscillator model of the dopaminergic neuron, which represents the soma and dendrites as electrically coupled compartments with different natural spiking frequencies, by addition of dendritic AMPA (voltage-independent) or NMDA (voltage-dependent) synaptic conductance. Both soma and dendrites contain a simplified version of the calcium-potassium mechanism known to be the mechanism for slow spontaneous oscillation and background firing in dopaminergic cells. We show that because of its voltage dependence, NMDA receptor activation acts to amplify the effect on the soma of the high-frequency oscillation of the dendrites, which is normally too weak to exert a large influence on the overall oscillation frequency of the neuron.
Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal model (Amir, Devor 2003)
The model shows that an electrically excitable soma is not necessary for spike through-conduction in the t-shaped geometry of a dorsal root ganglion neuron axon. Electrical excitability of the soma is required, however, for soma spike invasion. See papers for details and more.
Dynamics of Spike Initiation (Prescott et al. 2008)
"Transduction of graded synaptic input into trains of all-or-none action potentials (spikes) is a crucial step in neural coding. Hodgkin identified three classes of neurons with qualitatively different analog-to-digital transduction properties. Despite widespread use of this classification scheme, a generalizable explanation of its biophysical basis has not been described. We recorded from spinal sensory neurons representing each class and reproduced their transduction properties in a minimal model. With phase plane and bifurcation analysis, each class of excitability was shown to derive from distinct spike initiating dynamics. Excitability could be converted between all three classes by varying single parameters; moreover, several parameters, when varied one at a time, had functionally equivalent effects on excitability. From this, we conclude that the spike-initiating dynamics associated with each of Hodgkin’s classes represent different outcomes in a nonlinear competition between oppositely directed, kinetically mismatched currents. ..."
Effect of riluzole on action potential in cultured human skeletal muscle cells (Wang YJ et al. 2008)
Simulation studies also unraveled that both decreased conductance of I(Na) and increased conductance of I(K(Ca)) utilized to mimic riluzole actions in skeletal muscle cells could combine to decrease the amplitude of action potentials and increase the repolarization of action potentials.
Effect of slowly inactivating IKdr to delayed firing of action potentials (Wu et al. 2008)
"The properties of slowly inactivating delayed-rectifier K+ current (IKdr) were investigated in NG108-15 neuronal cells differentiated with long-term exposure to dibutyryl cyclic AMP. ... The computer model, in which state-dependent inactivation of IKdr was incorporated, was also implemented to predict the firing behavior present in NG108-15 cells. ... Our theoretical work and the experimental results led us to propose a pivotal role of slowly inactivating IKdr in delayed firing of APs in NG108-15 cells. The results also suggest that aconitine modulation of IKdr gating is an important molecular mechanism through which it can contribute to neuronal firing."
Effect of trp-like current on APs during exposure to sinusoidal voltage (Chen et al. 2010)
"... Previous work showed that magnetic electrical field-induced antinoceptive action is mediated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents. In this study, a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, in which TRP-like current (I-TRP) was incorporated, was implemented to predict the firing behavior of action potentials (APs), as the model neuron was exposed to sinusoidal changes in externally-applied voltage. ... Our simulation results suggest that modulation of TRP-like channels functionally expressed in small-diameter peripheral sensory neurons should be an important mechanism through which it can contribute to the firing pattern of APs."
Effects of Acetyl-L-carnitine on neural transmission (Lombardo et al 2004)
Acetyl-L-carnitine is known to improve many aspects of the neural activity even if its exact role in neurotransmission is still unknown. This study investigates the effects of acetyl-L-carnitine in T segmental sensory neurons of the leech Hirudo medicinalis. These neurons are involved in some forms of neural plasticity associated with learning processes. Their physiological firing is accompanied by a large afterhyperpolarization that is mainly due to the Na+/K+ ATPase activity and partially to a Ca2+-dependent K+ current. A clear-cut hyperpolarization and a significant increase of the afterhyperpolarization have been recorded in T neurons of leeches injected with 2 mM acetyl-L-carnitine some days before. Acute treatments of 50 mM acetyl-L-carnitine induced similar effects in T cells of naive animals. Moreover, in these cells, widely arborized, the afterhyperpolarization seems to play an important role in determining the action potential transmission at neuritic bifurcations. A computational model of a T cell has been previously developed considering detailed data for geometry and the modulation of the pump current. Herein, we showed that to a larger afterhyperpolarization, due to the acetyl-L-carnitine-induced effects, corresponds a decrement in the number of action potentials reaching synaptic terminals.
Effects of eugenol on the firing of action potentials in NG108-15 neurons (Huang et al. 2011)
"Rationale: Eugenol (EUG, 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol), the main component of essential oil extracted from cloves, has various uses in medicine because of its potential to modulate neuronal excitability. However, its effects on the ionic mechanisms remains incompletely understood. Objectives: We aimed to investigate EUG`s effects on neuronal ionic currents and excitability, especially on voltage-gated ion currents, and to verify the effects on a hyperexcitability-temporal lobe seizure model. Methods: With the aid of patch-clamp technology, we first investigated the effects of EUG on ionic currents in NG108-15 neuronal cells differentiated with cyclic AMP. We then used modified Pinsky-Rinzel simulation modeling to evaluate its effects on spontaneous action potentials (APs). Finally, we investigated its effects on pilocarpine-induced seizures in rats. Results: EUG depressed the transient and late components of INa in the neurons. It not only increased the degree of INa inactivation, but specifically suppressed the non-inactivating INa (INa(NI)). ... In addition, EUG diminished L-type Ca2+ current and delayed rectifier K+ current only at higher concentrations. EUG`s effects on APs frequency reduction was verified by the simulation modeling. In pilocarpine-induced seizures, the EUG-treated rats showed no shorter seizure latency but a lower seizure severity and mortality than the control rats. ... Conclusion: The synergistic blocking effects of INa and INa(NI) contributes to the main mechanism through which EUG affects the firing of neuronal APs and modulate neuronal hyperexcitability such as pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe seizures."
Effects of KIR current inactivation in NAc Medium Spiny Neurons (Steephen and Manchanda 2009)
"Inward rectifying potassium (KIR) currents in medium spiny (MS) neurons of nucleus accumbens inactivate significantly in ~40% of the neurons but not in the rest, which may lead to differences in input processing by these two groups. Using a 189-compartment computational model of the MS neuron, we investigate the influence of this property using injected current as well as spatiotemporally distributed synaptic inputs. Our study demonstrates that KIR current inactivation facilitates depolarization, firing frequency and firing onset in these neurons. ..."
Effects of the membrane AHP on the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO) (Zhou & Colburn 2010)
This simulation study investigated how membrane afterhyperpolarization (AHP) influences spiking activity of neurons in the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO). The model incorporates a general integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with a first-order adaptation channel. Simulations focus on differentiating the effects of GAHP, tauAHP, and input strength on (1) spike interval statistics, such as negative serial correlation and chopper onset, and (2) neural sensitivity to interaural level difference (ILD) of LSO neurons. The model simulated electrophysiological data collected in cat LSO (Tsuchitani and Johnson, 1985).
Enhanced Excitability in Hermissenda: modulation by 5-HT (Cai et al 2003)
Serotonin (5-HT) applied to the exposed but otherwise intact nervous system results in enhanced excitability of Hermissenda type-B photoreceptors. Several ion currents in the type-B photoreceptors are modulated by 5-HT, including the A-type K+ current (IK,A), sustained Ca2+ current (ICa,S), Ca-dependent K+ current (IK,Ca), and a hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier current (Ih). In this study,we developed a computational model that reproduces physiological characteristics of type B photoreceptors, e.g. resting membrane potential, dark-adapted spike activity, spike width, and the amplitude difference between somatic and axonal spikes. We then used the model to investigate the contribution of different ion currents modulated by 5-HT to the magnitudes of enhanced excitability produced by 5-HT. See paper for results and more details.
Ephaptic interactions in olfactory nerve (Bokil et al 2001)
Bokil, H., Laaris, N., Blinder, K., Ennis, M., and Keller, A. (2001) Ephaptic interactions in the mammalian olfactory system. J. Neurosci. 21:RC173(1-5)
Excitability of PFC Basal Dendrites (Acker and Antic 2009)
".. We carried out multi-site voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium or Ih, conductance had little effect on dendritic action potential propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling (NEURON) was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a non-uniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a non-uniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high frequency trains of action potentials, and the local generation of sodium spikelets. ..."
Excitability of the soma in central nervous system neurons (Safronov et al 2000)
The ability of the soma of a spinal dorsal horn neuron, a spinal ventral horn neuron, and a hippocampal pyramidal neuron to generate action potentials was studied using experiments and computer simulations. By comparing recordings ... of a dorsal horn neuron with simulated responses, it was shown that computer models can be adequate for the study of somatic excitability. The modeled somata of both spinal neurons were unable to generate action potentials, showing only passive and local responses to current injections. ... In contrast to spinal neurons, the modeled soma of the hippocampal pyramidal neuron generated spikes with an overshoot of +9 mV. It is concluded that the somata of spinal neurons cannot generate action potentials and seem to resist their propagation from the axon to dendrites. ... See paper for more and details.
Excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites (Behabadi et al. 2012)
" ... We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. ..."
Fast sodium channel gating in mossy fiber axons (Schmidt-Heiber et al. 2010)
"... To study the mechanisms underlying AP initiation in unmyelinated hippocampal mossy fibers of adult mice, we recorded sodium currents in axonal and somatic membrane patches. We demonstrate that sodium channel density in the proximal axon is ~5 times higher than in the soma. Furthermore, sodium channel activation and inactivation are ~2 times faster. Modeling revealed that the fast activation localized the initiation site to the proximal axon even upon strong synaptic stimulation, while fast inactivation contributed to energy-efficient membrane charging during APs. ..."
Fast-spiking cortical interneuron (Golomb et al. 2007)
Cortical fast-spiking (FS) interneurons display highly variable electrophysiological properties. We hypothesize that this variability emerges naturally if one assumes a continuous distribution of properties in a small set of active channels. We construct a minimal, single-compartment conductance-based model of FS cells that includes transient Na+, delayed-rectifier K+, and slowly inactivating d-type K+ conductances. The model may display delay to firing. Stuttering (elliptic bursting) and subthreshold oscillations may be observed for small Na+ window current.
Febrile seizure-induced modifications to Ih (Chen et al 2001)
Modeling and experiments in the paper Chen K,Aradi I, Thom N,Eghbal-Ahmadi M, Baram TZ, and Soltesz I (2001) support the hypothesis that modified Ih currents strongly influence inhibitory inputs in CA1 cells and that the depolarizing shift in Ih activation plays a primary role in this process. Please see the paper for details. Some modeling details are available at http://www.ucihs.uci.edu/anatomy/soltesz/supp.htm Correspondance should be addressed to isoltesz@uci.edu (modeling was done by Ildiko Aradi, iaradi@uci.edu)
Firing neocortical layer V pyramidal neuron (Reetz et al. 2014; Stadler et al. 2014)
Neocortical Layer V model with firing behaviour adjusted to in vitro observations. The model was used to investigate the effects of IFN and PKC on the excitability of neurons (Stadler et al 2014, Reetz et al. 2014). The model contains new channel simulations for HCN1, HCN2 and the big calcium dependent potassium channel BK.
Frog second-order vestibular neuron models (Rössert et al. 2011)
This implements spiking Hodgkin-Huxley type models of tonic and phasic second-order vestibular neurons. Models fitted to intracellular spike and membrane potential recordings from frog (Rana temporaria). The models can be stimulated by intracellular step current, frequency current (ZAP) or synaptic stimulation.
Functional impact of dendritic branch point morphology (Ferrante et al., 2013)
" ... Here, we first quantified the morphological variability of branch points from two-photon images of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We then investigated the geometrical features affecting spike initiation, propagation, and timing with a computational model validated by glutamate uncaging experiments. The results suggest that even subtle membrane readjustments at branch point could drastically alter the ability of synaptic input to generate, propagate, and time action potentials."
Functional structure of mitral cell dendritic tuft (Djurisic et al. 2008)
The computational modeling component of Djurisic et al. 2008 addressed two primary questions: whether amplification by active currents is necessary to explain the relatively mild attenuation suffered by tuft EPSPs spreading along the primary dendrite to the soma; what accounts for the relatively uniform peak EPSP amplitude throughout the tuft. These simulations show that passive spread from tuft to soma is sufficient to yield the low attenuation of tuft EPSPs, and that random distribution of a biologically plausible number of excitatory synapses throughout the tuft can produce the experimentally observed uniformity of depolarization.
Globus pallidus multi-compartmental model neuron with realistic morphology (Gunay et al. 2008)
"Globus pallidus (GP) neurons recorded in brain slices show significant variability in intrinsic electrophysiological properties. To investigate how this variability arises, we manipulated the biophysical properties of GP neurons using computer simulations. ... Our results indicated that most of the experimental variability could be matched by varying conductance densities, which we confirmed with additional partial block experiments. Further analysis resulted in two key observations: (1) each voltage-gated conductance had effects on multiple measures such as action potential waveform and spontaneous or stimulated spike rates; and (2) the effect of each conductance was highly dependent on the background context of other conductances present. In some cases, such interactions could reverse the effect of the density of one conductance on important excitability measures. ..."
Globus pallidus neuron models with differing dendritic Na channel expression (Edgerton et al., 2010)
A set of 9 multi-compartmental rat GP neuron models (585 compartments) differing only in their expression of dendritic fast sodium channels were compared in their synaptic integration properties. Dendritic fast sodium channels were found to increase the importance of distal synapses (both excitatory AND inhibitory), increase spike timing variability with in vivo-like synaptic input, and make the model neurons highly sensitive to clustered synchronous excitation.
GPi/GPe neuron models (Johnson and McIntyre 2008)
Model files for two types of non-human primate neurons used in the paper: simplified versions of 1) a GPi neuron and 2) a GPe axon collateralizing in GPi en route to STN.
Granule Cells of the Olfactory Bulb (Simoes_De_Souza et al. 2014)
Electrical responses of three classes of granule cells of the olfactory bulb to synaptic activation in different dendritic locations. The constructed models were based on morphological detailed compartmental reconstructions of three granule cell classes of the olfactory bulb with active dendrites described by Bhalla and Bower (J. Neurophysiol. 69: 1948-1965, 1993) and dendritic spine distributions described by Woolf et al. (J. Neurosci. 11: 1837-1854, 1991). The computational studies with the model neurons showed that different quantities of spines have to be activated in each dendritic region to induce an action potential, which always was originated in the active terminal dendrites, independently of the location of the stimuli and the morphology of the dendritic tree.
HERG K+ channels spike-frequency adaptation (Chiesa et al 1997)
Spike frequency adaptation has contributions from the IHERG current (encoded by the human eag-related gene (HERG); Warmke & Ganetzky, 1994), which develops with slow kinetics during depolarization and contributes to the repolarization of the long action potentials typically present in the heart. IHERG is one of the delayed rectifier currents (IK(r)) of the heart, and HERG mutations are associated with one of the cardiac arrhythmia LQT syndromes (LQT2). See paper for more and details.
High frequency oscillations induced in three gap-junction coupled neurons (Tseng et al. 2008)
Here we showed experimentally that high frequency oscillations (up to 600 Hz) were easily induced in a purely gap-junction coupled network by simple two stimuli with very short interval. The root cause is that the second elicited spike suffered from slow propagation speed and failure to transmit through a low-conductance junction. Similiar results were also obtained in these simulation.
Hippocampal basket cell gap junction network dynamics (Saraga et al. 2006)
2 cell network of hippocampal basket cells connected by gap junctions. Paper explores how distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.
Homosynaptic plasticity in the tail withdrawal circuit (TWC) of Aplysia (Baxter and Byrne 2006)
The tail-withdrawal circuit of Aplysia provides a useful model system for investigating synaptic dynamics. Sensory neurons within the circuit manifest several forms of synaptic plasticity. Here, we developed a model of the circuit and investigated the ways in which depression (DEP) and potentiation (POT) contributed to information processing. DEP limited the amount of motor neuron activity that could be elicited by the monosynaptic pathway alone. POT within the monosynaptic pathway did not compensate for DEP. There was, however, a synergistic interaction between POT and the polysynaptic pathway. This synergism extended the dynamic range of the network, and the interplay between DEP and POT made the circuit respond preferentially to long-duration, low-frequency inputs.
Hysteresis in voltage gating of HCN channels (Elinder et al 2006, Mannikko et al 2005)
We found that HCN2 and HCN4 channels expressed in oocytes from the frog Xenopus laevis do not display the activation kinetic changes that we (previously) observed in spHCN and HCN1. However, HCN2 and HCN4 channels display changes in their tail currents, suggesting that these channels also undergo mode shifts and that the conformational changes underlying the mode shifts are due to conserved aspects of HCN channels. With computer modelling, we show that in channels with relatively slow opening kinetics and fast mode-shift transitions, such as HCN2 and HCN4 channels, the mode shift effects are not readily observable, except in the tail kinetics. Computer simulations of sino-atrial node action potentials suggest that the HCN2 channel, together with the HCN1 channel, are important regulators of the heart firing frequency and that the mode shift is an important property to prevent arrhythmic firing. We conclude that although all HCN channels appear to undergo mode shifts – and thus may serve to prevent arrhythmic firing – it is mainly observable in ionic currents from HCN channels with faster kinetics. See papers for more and details.
I A in Kenyon cells resemble Shaker currents (Pelz et al 1999)
Cultured Kenyon cells from the mushroom body of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, show a voltage-gated, fast transient K1 current that is sensitive to 4-aminopyridine, an A current. The kinetic properties of this A current and its modulation by extracellular K1 ions were investigated in vitro with the whole cell patch-clamp technique. The A current was isolated from other voltage-gated currents either pharmacologically or with suitable voltage-clamp protocols. Hodgkin- and Huxley-style mathematical equations were used for the description of this current and for the simulation of action potentials in a Kenyon cell model. The data of the A current were incorporated into a reduced computational model of the voltage-gated currents of Kenyon cells. In addition, the model contained a delayed rectifier K current, a Na current, and a leakage current. The model reproduces several experimental features and makes predictions. See paper for details and results.
IA and IT interact to set first spike latency (Molineux et al 2005)
Using patch clamp and modeling, we illustrate that spike latency characteristics are the product of an interplay between I(A) and low-threshold calcium current (I(T)) that requires a steady-state difference in the inactivation parameters of the currents. Furthermore, we show that the unique first-spike latency characteristics of stellate cells have important implications for the integration of coincident IPSPs and EPSPs, such that inhibition can shift first-spike latency to differentially modulate the probability of firing.
Impact of dendritic atrophy on intrinsic and synaptic excitability (Narayanan & Chattarji, 2010)
These simulations examined the atrophy induced changes in electrophysiological properties of CA3 pyramidal neurons. We found these neurons change from bursting to regular spiking as atrophy increases. Region-specific atrophy induced region-specific increases in synaptic excitability in a passive dendritic tree. All dendritic compartments of an atrophied neuron had greater synaptic excitability and a larger voltage transfer to the soma than the control neuron.
Impact of fast Na channel inact. on AP threshold & synaptic integration (Platkiewicz & Brette 2011)
Slope-threshold relationship with noisy inputs, in the adaptive threshold model.
INa and IKv4.3 heterogeneity in canine LV myocytes (Flaim et al 2006)
"The roles of sustained components of INa and IKv43 in shaping the action potentials (AP) of myocytes isolated from the canine left ventricle (LV) have not been studied in detail. Here we investigate the hypothesis that these two currents can contribute substantially to heterogeneity of early repolarization and arrhythmic risk.... The resulting simulations illustrate ways in which KChIP2- and Ca2+- dependent control of IKv43 can result in a sustained outward current that can neutralize INaL in a rate- and myocyte subtype-dependent manner. Both these currents appear to play significant roles in modulating AP duration and rate dependence in midmyocardial myocytes. ... By design, these models allow upward integration into organ models or may be used as a basis for further investigations into cellular heterogeneities." See paper for more and details.
Information transmission in cerebellar granule cell models (Rossert et al. 2014)
" ... In this modeling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e., uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode). A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fiber synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR). Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for. The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fiber synaptic inputs could transmit infoarmation faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. ... "
Input Fluctuations effects on f-I curves (Arsiero et al. 2007)
"... We examined in vitro frequency versus current (f-I) relationships of layer 5 (L5) pyramidal cells of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) using fluctuating stimuli. ...our results show that mPFC L5 pyramidal neurons retain an increased sensitivity to input fluctuations, whereas their sensitivity to the input mean diminishes to near zero. ..."
Intracortical synaptic potential modulation by presynaptic somatic potential (Shu et al. 2006, 2007)
" ... Here we show that the voltage fluctuations associated with dendrosomatic synaptic activity propagate significant distances along the axon, and that modest changes in the somatic membrane potential of the presynaptic neuron modulate the amplitude and duration of axonal action potentials and, through a Ca21- dependent mechanism, the average amplitude of the postsynaptic potential evoked by these spikes. These results indicate that synaptic activity in the dendrite and soma controls not only the pattern of action potentials generated, but also the amplitude of the synaptic potentials that these action potentials initiate in local cortical circuits, resulting in synaptic transmission that is a mixture of triggered and graded (analogue) signals."
Intrinsic sensory neurons of the gut (Chambers et al. 2014)
A conductance base model of intrinsic neurons neurons in the gastrointestinal tract. The model contains all the major voltage-gated and calcium-gated currents observed in these neurons. This model can reproduce physiological observations such as the response to multiple brief depolarizing currents, prolonged depolarizing currents and hyperpolarizing currents. This model can be used to predict how different currents influence the excitability of intrinsic sensory neurons in the gut.
Ionic mechanisms of dendritic spikes (Almog and Korngreen 2014)
We used a combined experimental and numerical parameter peeling procedure was implemented to optimize a detailed ionic mechanism for the generation and propagation of dendritic spikes in neocortical L5 pyramidal neurons. Run the cc_run.hoc to get a demo for dendritic calcium spike generated by coincidence of a back-propagating AP and distal synaptic input.
Kenyon cells in the honeybee (Wustenberg et al 2004)
The mushroom body of the insect brain is an important locus for olfactory information processing and associative learning. ... Current- and voltage-clamp analyses were performed on cultured Kenyon cells from honeybees. ... Voltage-clamp analyses characterized a fast transient Na+ current (INa), a delayed rectifier K+ current (IK,V) and a fast transient K+ current (IK,A). Using the neurosimulator SNNAP, a Hodgkin-Huxley type model was developed and used to investigate the roles of the different currents during spiking. The model led to the prediction of a slow transient outward current (IK,ST) that was subsequently identified by reevaluating the voltage-clamp data. Simulations indicated that the primary currents that underlie spiking are INa and IK,V, whereas IK,A and IK,ST primarily determined the responsiveness of the model to stimuli such constant or oscillatory injections of current. See paper for more details.
Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
Leech heart interneuron network model (Hill et al 2001, 2002)
We have created a computational model of the timing network that paces the heartbeat of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis. In the intact nerve cord, segmental oscillators are mutually entrained to the same cycle period. Although experiments have shown that the segmental oscillators are coupled by inhibitory coordinating interneurons, the underlying mechanisms of intersegmental coordination have not yet been elucidated. To help understand this coordination, we have created a simple computational model with two variants: symmetric and asymmetric. See references for more details. Biologically realistic network models with two, six, and eight cells and a tutorial are available at the links to Calabrese's web site below.
Leech Mechanosensory Neurons: Synaptic Facilitation by Reflected APs (Baccus 1998)
This model by Stephen Baccus explores the phenomena of action potential (AP) propagation at branch boints in axons. APs are sometimes transmitted down the efferent processes and sometimes are reflected back to the axon of AP origin or neither. See the paper for details. The model zip file contains a readme.txt which list introductory steps to follow to run the simulation. Stephen Baccus's email address: baccus@fas.harvard.edu
Low Threshold Calcium Currents in TC cells (Destexhe et al 1998)
In Destexhe, Neubig, Ulrich, and Huguenard (1998) experiments and models examine low threshold calcium current's (IT, or T-current) distribution in thalamocortical (TC) cells. Multicompartmental modeling supports the hypothesis that IT currents have a density at least several fold higher in the dendrites than the soma. The IT current contributes significantly to rebound bursts and is thought to have important network behavior consequences. See the paper for details. See also http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr Correspondance may be addressed to Alain Destexhe: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
Mammalian Ventricular Cell (Beeler and Reuter 1977)
This classic model of ventricular myocardial fibres was implemented by Francois Gannier. "... Four individual components of ionic current were formulated mathematically in terms of Hodgkin-Huxley type equations. The model incorporates two voltage- and time-dependent inward currents, the excitatory inward sodium current, illa, and a secondary or slow inward current, is, primarily carried by calcium ions. A time-independent outward potassium current, iK1, exhibiting inward-going rectification, and a voltage- and time-dependent outward current, i.1, primarily carried by potassium ions, are further elements of the model...."
Mathematical model for windup (Aguiar et al. 2010)
"Windup is characterized as a frequency-dependent increase in the number of evoked action potentials in dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical stimulation of afferent C-fibers. ... The approach presented here relies on mathematical and computational analysis to study the mechanism(s) underlying windup. From experimentally obtained windup profiles, we extract the time scale of the facilitation mechanisms that may support the characteristics of windup. Guided by these values and using simulations of a biologically realistic compartmental model of a wide dynamic range (WDR) neuron, we are able to assess the contribution of each mechanism for the generation of action potentials windup. ..."
Measuring neuronal identification quality in ensemble recordings (isoitools) (Neymotin et al. 2011)
"... Here we describe information theoretic measures of action potential waveform isolation applicable to any dataset, that have an intuitive, universal interpretation, and that are not dependent on the methods or choice of parameters for single unit isolation, and that have been validated using a dataset."
Mechanisms of fast rhythmic bursting in a layer 2/3 cortical neuron (Traub et al 2003)
This simulation is based on the reference paper listed below.

This port was made by Roger D Traub and Maciej T Lazarewicz (mlazarew@seas.upenn.edu) Thanks to Ashlen P Reid for help with porting a morphology of the cell.

Mechanisms of magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons (Pashut et al. 2011)
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely applied tool for probing cognitive function in humans and is one of the best tools for clinical treatments and interfering with cognitive tasks. Surprisingly, while TMS has been commercially available for decades, the cellular mechanisms underlying magnetic stimulation remain unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using compartmental modeling. We generated a numerical scheme allowing simulation of the physiological response to magnetic stimulation of neurons with arbitrary morphologies and active properties. Computational experiments using this scheme suggested that TMS affects neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) primarily by somatic stimulation.
Mechanisms of very fast oscillations in axon networks coupled by gap junctions (Munro, Borgers 2010)
Axons connected by gap junctions can produce very fast oscillations (VFOs, > 80 Hz) when stimulated randomly at a low rate. The models here explore the mechanisms of VFOs that can be seen in an axonal plexus, (Munro & Borgers, 2009): a large network model of an axonal plexus, small network models of axons connected by gap junctions, and an implementation of the model underlying figure 12 in Traub et al. (1999) . The large network model consists of 3,072 5-compartment axons connected in a random network. The 5-compartment axons are the 5 axonal compartments from the CA3 pyramidal cell model in Traub et al. (1994) with a fixed somatic voltage. The random network has the same parameters as the random network in Traub et al. (1999), and axons are stimulated randomly via a Poisson process with a rate of 2/s/axon. The small network models simulate waves propagating through small networks of axons connected by gap junctions to study how local connectivity affects the refractory period.
Mechanisms underlying subunit independence in pyramidal neuron dendrites (Behabadi and Mel 2014)
"...Using a detailed compartmental model of a layer 5 pyramidal neuron, and an improved method for quantifying subunit independence that incorporates a more accurate model of dendritic integration, we first established that the output of each dendrite can be almost perfectly predicted by the intensity and spatial configuration of its own synaptic inputs, and is nearly invariant to the rate of bAP-mediated 'cross-talk' from other dendrites over a 100-fold range..."
Medial vestibular neuron models (Quadroni and Knopfel 1994)
The structure and the parameters of the model cells were chosen to reproduce the responses of type A and type B MVNns as described in electrophysiological recordings. The emergence of oscillatory firing under these two specific experimental conditions is consistent with electrophysiological recordings not used during construction of the model. We, therefore, suggest that these models have a high predictive value.
Microcircuits of L5 thick tufted pyramidal cells (Hay & Segev 2014)
"... We simulated detailed conductance-based models of TTCs (Layer 5 thick tufted pyramidal cells) forming recurrent microcircuits that were interconnected as found experimentally; the network was embedded in a realistic background synaptic activity. ... Our findings indicate that dendritic nonlinearities are pivotal in controlling the gain and the computational functions of TTCs microcircuits, which serve as a dominant output source for the neocortex. "
Minimal cell model (Av-Ron et al 1991)
The minimal cell model (MCM) is a reduced Hodgkin-Huxley model that can exhibit excitable and oscillatory behavior. It consists of two ordinary differential equations, dV/dt for membrane voltage and dW/dt for potassium activation and sodium inactivation. The MCM has a stable membrane potential of -60mV. With constant input current of 10uA/cm2, it exhibits oscillations of 150Hz. It is based on the work by FitzHugh and Rinzel.
Model of arrhythmias in a cardiac cells network (Casaleggio et al. 2014)
" ... Here we explore the possible processes leading to the occasional onset and termination of the (usually) non-fatal arrhythmias widely observed in the heart. Using a computational model of a two-dimensional network of cardiac cells, we tested the hypothesis that an ischemia alters the properties of the gap junctions inside the ischemic area. ... In conclusion, our model strongly supports the hypothesis that non-fatal arrhythmias can develop from post-ischemic alteration of the electrical connectivity in a relatively small area of the cardiac cell network, and suggests experimentally testable predictions on their possible treatments."
Model of repetitive firing in Grueneberg ganglion olfactory neurons (Liu et al., 2012)
This model is constructed based on properties of Na+ and K+ currents observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings of mouse Grueneberg ganglion neurons in acute slices. Two distinct Na+ conductances representing the TTX-sensitive and TTX-resistant currents and one delayed rectifier K+ currrent are included. By modulating the maximal conductances of Na+ currents, one can reproduce the regular, phasic, and sporadic patterns of repetitive firing found in the patch clamp experiments.
Modeling conductivity profiles in the deep neocortical pyramidal neuron (Wang K et al. 2013)
"With the rapid increase in the number of technologies aimed at observing electric activity inside the brain, scientists have felt the urge to create proper links between intracellular- and extracellular-based experimental approaches. Biophysical models at both physical scales have been formalized under assumptions that impede the creation of such links. In this work, we address this issue by proposing amulticompartment model that allows the introduction of complex extracellular and intracellular resistivity profiles. This model accounts for the geometrical and electrotonic properties of any type of neuron through the combination of four devices: the integrator, the propagator, the 3D connector, and the collector. ..."
Modeling interactions in Aplysia neuron R15 (Yu et al 2004)
"The biophysical properties of neuron R15 in Aplysia endow it with the ability to express multiple modes of oscillatory electrical activity, such as beating and bursting. Previous modeling studies examined the ways in which membrane conductances contribute to the electrical activity of R15 and the ways in which extrinsic modulatory inputs alter the membrane conductances by biochemical cascades and influence the electrical activity. The goals of the present study were to examine the ways in which electrical activity influences the biochemical cascades and what dynamical properties emerge from the ongoing interactions between electrical activity and these cascades." See paper for more and details.
Models of Na channels from a paper on the PKC control of I Na,P (Baker 2005)
"The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) persistent Na(+) current, attributed to Na(V)1.9, was recorded in small (< 25 mum apparent diameter) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones cultured from P21 rats and from adult wild-type and Na(V)1.8 null mice. ... Numerical simulation of the up-regulation qualitatively reproduced changes in sensory neurone firing properties. ..." Note: models of NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 and also persistent and transient Na channels that collectively model Nav 1.1, 1.6, and 1.7 are present in this model.
Multicompartmental cerebellar granule cell model (Diwakar et al. 2009)
A detailed multicompartmental model was used to study neuronal electroresponsiveness of cerebellar granule cells in rats. Here we show that, in cerebellar granule cells, Na+ channels are enriched in the axon, especially in the hillock, but almost absent from soma and dendrites. Numerical simulations indicated that granule cells have a compact electrotonic structure allowing EPSPs to diffuse with little attenuation from dendrites to axon. The spike arose almost simultaneously along the whole axonal ascending branch and invaded the hillock, whose activation promoted spike back-propagation with marginal delay (<200 micros) and attenuation (<20 mV) into the somato-dendritic compartment. For details check the cited article.
Multiscale model of olfactory receptor neuron in mouse (Dougherty 2009)
Collection of XPP (.ode) files simulating the signal transduction (slow) and action potential (fast) currents in the olfactory receptor neuron of mouse. Collection contains model configured for dual odorant pulse delivery and model configured for prolonged odorant delivery. For those interested more in transduction processes, each whole cell recording model comes with a counter part file configured to show just the slow transduction current for ease of use and convenience. These transduction-only models typically run faster than the full multi-scale models but do not demonstrate action potentials.
Myelinated axon conduction velocity (Brill et al 1977)
Examines conduction velocity as function of internodal length.
MyFirstNEURON (Houweling, Sejnowski 1997)
MyFirstNEURON is a NEURON demo by Arthur Houweling and Terry Sejnowski. Perform experiments from the book 'Electrophysiology of the Neuron, A Companion to Shepherd's Neurobiology, An Interactive Tutorial' by John Huguenard & David McCormick, Oxford University Press 1997, or design your own one or two cell simulation. For more information see http://www.cnl.salk.edu/Simulations. Salk Institute, Computational Neurobiology Lab, 10010 North Torrey Pines Rd., La Jolla CA 092037. Email: arthur@salk.edu
Na+ channel dependence of AP initiation in cortical pyramidal neuron (Kole et al. 2008)
In this simulation action potential initiation, action potential properties and the role of axon initial segment Na+ channels are investigated in a realistic model of a layer 5 pyramidal neuron axon initial segment. The main Na+ channel properties were constrained by experimental data and the axon initial segment was reconstructed. Model parameters were constrained by direct recordings at the axon initial segment.
NAcc medium spiny neuron: effects of cannabinoid withdrawal (Spiga et al. 2010)
Cannabinoid withdrawal produces a hypofunction of dopaminergic neurons targeting medium spiny neurons (MSN) of the forebrain. Administration of a CB1 receptor antagonist to control rats provoked structural abnormalities, reminiscent of those observed in withdrawal conditions and support the regulatory role of cannabinoids in neurogenesis, axonal growth and synaptogenesis. Experimental observations were incorporated into a realistic computational model which predicts a strong reduction in the excitability of morphologically-altered MSN, yielding a significant reduction in action potential output. These paper provided direct morphological evidence for functional abnormalities associated with cannabinoid dependence at the level of dopaminergic neurons and their post synaptic counterpart, supporting a hypodopaminergic state as a distinctive feature of the “addicted brain”.
Nav1.6 sodium channel model in globus pallidus neurons (Mercer et al. 2007)
Model files for the paper Mercer JN, Chan CS, Tkatch T, Held J, Surmeier DJ. Nav1.6 sodium channels are critical to pacemaking and fast spiking in globus pallidus neurons.,J Neurosci. 2007 Dec 5;27(49):13552-66.
Neocort. pyramidal cells subthreshold somatic voltage controls spike propagation (Munro Kopell 2012)
There is suggestive evidence that pyramidal cell axons in neocortex may be coupled by gap junctions into an ``axonal plexus" capable of generating Very Fast Oscillations (VFOs) with frequencies exceeding 80 Hz. It is not obvious, however, how a pyramidal cell in such a network could control its output when action potentials are free to propagate from the axons of other pyramidal cells into its own axon. We address this problem by means of simulations based on 3D reconstructions of pyramidal cells from rat somatosensory cortex. We show that somatic depolarization enables propagation via gap junctions into the initial segment and main axon, while somatic hyperpolarization disables it. We show further that somatic voltage cannot effectively control action potential propagation through gap junctions on minor collaterals; action potentials may therefore propagate freely from such collaterals regardless of somatic voltage. In previous work, VFOs are all but abolished during the hyperpolarization phase of slow-oscillations induced by anesthesia in vivo. This finding constrains the density of gap junctions on collaterals in our model and suggests that axonal sprouting due to cortical lesions may result in abnormally high gap junction density on collaterals, leading in turn to excessive VFO activity and hence to epilepsy via kindling.
Nerve terminal currents at lizard neuromuscular junction (Lindgren, Moore 1989)
Loose patch clamp measurement of presynaptic ionic currents at lizard neuromuscular junction compared with computer simulations.
Neurite: simulating neuronal voltages under mechanical loading (Garcia-Grajales et al Under Review)
Neurite simulates the electrical signal propagation in myelinated and unmyelinated axons, and in dendritic trees under mechanical loading. Two different solvers are available (explicit and implicit) with sequential (CPU) and parallel (GPUs) versions
Nigral dopaminergic neurons: effects of ethanol on Ih (Migliore et al. 2008)
We use a realistic computational model of dopaminergic neurons in vivo to suggest that ethanol, through its effects on Ih, modifies the temporal structure of the spiking activity. The model predicts that the dopamine level may increase much more during bursting than pacemaking activity, especially in those brain regions with a slow dopamine clearance rate. The results suggest that a selective pharmacological remedy could thus be devised against the rewarding effects of ethanol that are postulated to mediate alcohol abuse and addiction, targeting the specific HCN genes expressed in dopaminergic neurons.
Nodes of Ranvier with left-shifted Nav channels (Boucher et al. 2012)
The two programs CLSRanvier.f and propagation.f simulate the excitability of a myelinated axon with injured nodes of Ranvier. The injury is simulated as the Coupled Left Shift (CLS) of the activation(V) and inactivation(V) (availability) of a fraction of Nav channels.
Norns - Neural Network Studio (Visser & Van Gils 2014)
The Norns - Neural Network Studio is a software package for designing, simulation and analyzing networks of spiking neurons. It consists of three parts: 1. "Urd": a Matlab frontend with high-level functions for quickly defining networks 2. "Verdandi": an optimized C++ simulation environment which runs the simulation defined by Urd 3. "Skuld": an advanced Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) for visual inspection of simulated data.
Novel Na current with slow de-inactivation (Tsutsui, Oka 2002)
The authors found a novel Na current in teleost thalamic nuclei was well described by the m^3 h Hodgkin-Huxley model. The kinetic parameters derived from their experiments (see the reference for details) revealed that the h gate had a large time constant (~100ms at -80 to -50mV). This explains the thalamic neurons long refractory period and the gradual recovery of AP amplitude as the inter spike interval grows.
O-LM interneuron model (Lawrence et al. 2006)
Exploring the kinetics and distribution of the muscarinic potassium channel, IM, in 2 O-LM interneuron morphologies. Modulation of the ion channel by drugs such as XE991 (antagonist) and retigabine (agonist) are simulated in the models to examine the role of IM in spiking properties.
Olfactory bulb cluster formation (Migliore et al. 2010)
Functional roles of distributed synaptic clusters in the mitral-granule cell network of the olfactory bulb.
Olfactory bulb granule cell: effects of odor deprivation (Saghatelyan et al 2005)
The model supports the experimental findings on the effects of postnatal odor deprivation, and shows that a -10mV shift in the Na activation or a reduction in the dendritic length of newborn GC could independently explain the observed increase in excitability.
Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell column formation (Migliore et al. 2007)
In the olfactory bulb, the processing units for odor discrimination are believed to involve dendrodendritic synaptic interactions between mitral and granule cells. There is increasing anatomical evidence that these cells are organized in columns, and that the columns processing a given odor are arranged in widely distributed arrays. Experimental evidence is lacking on the underlying learning mechanisms for how these columns and arrays are formed. We have used a simplified realistic circuit model to test the hypothesis that distributed connectivity can self-organize through an activity-dependent dendrodendritic synaptic mechanism. The results point to action potentials propagating in the mitral cell lateral dendrites as playing a critical role in this mechanism, and suggest a novel and robust learning mechanism for the development of distributed processing units in a cortical structure.
Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell: dendrodendritic microcircuits (Migliore and Shepherd 2008)
This model shows how backpropagating action potentials in the long lateral dendrites of mitral cells, together with granule cell actions on mitral cells within narrow columns forming glomerular units, can provide a mechanism to activate strong local inhibition between arbitrarily distant mitral cells. The simulations predict a new role for the dendrodendritic synapses in the multicolumnar organization of the granule cells.
Olfactory bulb mitral cell: synchronization by gap junctions (Migliore et al 2005)
In a realistic model of two electrically connected mitral cells, the paper shows that the somatically-measured experimental properties of Gap Junctions (GJs) may correspond to a variety of different local coupling strengths and dendritic distributions of GJs in the tuft. The model suggests that the propagation of the GJ-induced local tuft depolarization is a major mechanim for intraglomerular synchronization of mitral cells.
Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule cell circuits (Migliore & McTavish 2013)
Model files for the entry "Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule Cell Circuits" of the Springer Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience by Michele Migliore and Tom Mctavish. The simulations illustrate two typical Mitral-Granule cell circuits in the olfactory bulb of vertebrates: distance-independent lateral inhibition and gating effects.
Olfactory Mitral Cell (Shen et al 1999)
Mitral cell model with standard parameters for the paper: Shen, G.Y., Chen, W. R., Midtgaard, J., Shepherd, G.M., and Hines, M.L. (1999) Computational Analysis of Action Potential Initiation in Mitral Cell Soma and Dendrites Based on Dual Patch Recordings. Journal of Neurophysiology 82:3006. Contact Michael.Hines@yale.edu if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
Olfactory Mitral cell: AP initiation modes (Chen et al 2002)
The mitral cell primary dendrite plays an important role in transmitting distal olfactory nerve input from olfactory glomerulus to the soma-axon initial segment. To understand how dendritic active properties are involved in this transmission, we have combined dual soma and dendritic patch recordings with computational modeling to analyze action-potential initiation and propagation in the primary dendrite.
On stochastic diff. eq. models for ion channel noise in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons (Goldwyn et al. 2010)
" ... We analyze three SDE models that have been proposed as approximations to the Markov chain model: one that describes the states of the ion channels and two that describe the states of the ion channel subunits. We show that the former channel-based approach can capture the distribution of channel noise and its effect on spiking in a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model to a degree not previously demonstrated, but the latter two subunit-based approaches cannot. ..."
Optical stimulation of a channelrhodopsin-2 positive pyramidal neuron model (Foutz et al 2012)
A computational tool to explore the underlying principles of optogenetic neural stimulation. This "light-neuron" model consists of theoretical representations of the light dynamics generated by a fiber optic in brain tissue, coupled to a multicompartment cable model of a cortical pyramidal neuron (Hu et al. 2009, ModelDB #123897) embedded with channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) membrane dynamics. Simulations predict that the activation threshold is sensitive to many of the properties of ChR2 (density, conductivity, and kinetics), tissue medium (scattering and absorbance), and the fiber-optic light source (diameter and numerical aperture). This model system represents a scientific instrument to characterize the effects of optogenetic neuromodulation, as well as an engineering design tool to help guide future development of optogenetic technology.
Prediction for the presence of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in myelinated central axons (Brown 2003)
"The objective of this current study was to investigate whether voltage gated Ca(2+) channels are present on axons of the adult rat optic nerve (RON). Simulations of axonal excitability using a Hodgkin-Huxley based one-compartment model incorporating I(Na), I(K) and leak currents were used to predict conditions under which the potential contribution of a Ca(2+) current to an evoked action potential could be measured. ... , as predicted by the simulation, reducing the repolarizing effect of I(K) by adding the K(+) channel blocker 4-AP revealed a Ca(2+) component on the repolarizing phase of the action potential that was blocked by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitor nifedipine."
Preserving axosomatic spiking features despite diverse dendritic morphology (Hay et al., 2013)
The authors found that linearly scaling the ion channel conductance densities of a reference model with the conductance load in 28 3D reconstructed layer 5 thick-tufted pyramidal cells was necessary to match the experimental statistics of these cells electrical firing properties.
Principles of Computational Modelling in Neuroscience (Book) (Sterratt et al. 2011)
"... This book provides a step-by-step account of how to model the neuron and neural circuitry to understand the nervous system at all levels, from ion channels to networks. Starting with a simple model of the neuron as an electrical circuit, gradually more details are added to include the effects of neuronal morphology, synapses, ion channels and intracellular signaling. The principle of abstraction is explained through chapters on simplifying models, and how simplified models can be used in networks. This theme is continued in a final chapter on modeling the development of the nervous system. Requiring an elementary background in neuroscience and some high school mathematics, this textbook is an ideal basis for a course on computational neuroscience."
Properties of aconitine-induced block of KDR current in NG108-15 neurons (Lin et al. 2008)
"The effects of aconitine (ACO), a highly toxic alkaloid, on ion currents in differentiated NG108-15 neuronal cells were investigated in this study. ACO (0.3-30 microM) suppressed the amplitude of delayed rectifier K+ current (IK(DR)) in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 3.1 microM. The presence of ACO enhanced the rate and extent of IK(DR) inactivation, although it had no effect on the initial activation phase of IK(DR). ... A modeled cell was designed to duplicate its inhibitory effect on spontaneous pacemaking. ... Taken together, the experimental data and simulations show that ACO can block delayed rectifier K+ channels of neurons in a concentration- and state-dependent manner. Changes in action potentials induced by ACO in neurons in vivo can be explained mainly by its blocking actions on IK(DR) and INa."
Proximal inhibition of Renshaw cells (Bui et al 2005)
Inhibitory synaptic inputs to Renshaw cells are concentrated on the soma and the juxtasomatic dendrites. In the present study, we investigated whether this proximal bias leads to more effective inhibition under different neuronal operating conditions. Using compartmental models based on detailed anatomical measurements of intracellularly stained Renshaw cells, we compared the inhibition produced by GABAA synapses when distributed with a proximal bias to the inhibition produced when the same synapses were distributed uniformly. See paper for more and details.
Pyramidal neuron coincidence detection tuned by dendritic branching pattern (Schaefer et al 2006)
"... We examined the relationship between dendritic arborization and the coupling between somatic and dendritic action potential (AP) initiation sites in layer 5 (L5) neocortical pyramidal neurons. Coupling was defined as the relative reduction in threshold for initiation of a dendritic calcium AP due to a coincident back-propagating AP. Simulations based on reconstructions of biocytin-filled cells showed that addition of oblique branches of the main apical dendrite in close proximity to the soma (d < 140 um) increases the coupling between the apical and axosomatic AP initiation zones, whereas incorporation of distal branches decreases coupling. ... We conclude that variation in dendritic arborization may be a key determinant of variability in coupling (49+-17%; range 19-83%; n = 37) and is likely to outweigh the contribution made by variations in active membrane properties. Thus coincidence detection of inputs arriving from different cortical layers is strongly regulated by differences in dendritic arborization."
Pyramidal neuron conductances state and STDP (Delgado et al. 2010)
Neocortical neurons in vivo process each of their individual inputs in the context of ongoing synaptic background activity, produced by the thousands of presynaptic partners a typical neuron has. That background activity affects multiple aspects of neuronal and network function. However, its effect on the induction of spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is not clear. Using the present biophysically-detailed computational model, it is not only able to replicate the conductance-dependent shunting of dendritic potentials (Delgado et al,2010), but show that synaptic background can truncate calcium dynamics within dendritic spines, in a way that affects potentiation more strongly than depression. This program uses a simplified layer 2/3 pyramidal neuron constructed in NEURON. It was similar to the model of Traub et al., J Neurophysiol. (2003), and consisted of a soma, an apical shaft, distal dendrites, five basal dendrites, an axon, and a single spine. The spine’s location was variable along the apical shaft (initial 50 μm) and apical. The axon contained an axon hillock region, an initial segment, segments with myelin, and nodes of Ranvier, in order to have realistic action potential generation. For more information about the model see supplemental material, Delgado et al 2010.
Pyramidal Neuron: Deep, Thalamic Relay and Reticular, Interneuron (Destexhe et al 1998, 2001)
This package shows single-compartment models of different classes of cortical neurons, such as the "regular-spiking", "fast-spiking" and "bursting" (LTS) neurons. The mechanisms included are the Na+ and K+ currents for generating action potentials (INa, IKd), the T-type calcium current (ICaT), and a slow voltage-dependent K+ current (IM). See http://cns.fmed.ulaval.ca/alain_demos.html
Rat phrenic motor neuron (Amini et al 2004)
We have developed a model for the rat phrenic motor neuron (PMN) that robustly replicates many experimentally observed behaviors of PMNs in response to pharmacological, ionic, and electrical perturbations using a single set of parameters.
Reflected SDE Hodgkin-Huxley Model (Dangerfield et al. 2012)
Matlab code for simulating channel noise using the original Hodgkin-Huxley equations and a variant of the Hodkgin-Huxley model from (Bruce, Annals Bio Eng, Vol 36, pp 824-838, 2009). Methods used in simulation are SSA, SDE method and RSDE method.
Rejuvenation model of dopamine neuron (Chan et al. 2007)
Model files for the paper C. Savio Chan, et al. 'Rejuvenation' protects neurons in mouse models of Parkinson's disease, Nature 447, 1081-1086(28 June 2007).
Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.
Role of KCNQ1 and IKs in cardiac repolarization (Silva, Rudy 2005)
Detailed Markov models of IKs (the slow delayed rectifier K+ current) and its alpha-subunit KCNQ1 were developed. The model is compared to experiment in the paper. The role of IKs in disease and drug treatments is elucidated (the prevention of excessive action potential prolongation and development of arrhythmogenic early afterdepolarizations). See paper for more and details.
Role of KCNQ1 and IKs in cardiac repolarization (Silva, Rudy 2005) (XPP)
Detailed Markov model of IKs (the slow delayed rectifier K+ current) is supplied here in XPP. The model is compared to experiment in the paper. The role of IKs in disease and drug treatments is elucidated (the prevention of excessive action potential prolongation and development of arrhythmogenic early afterdepolarizations). See also paper authors code and reference for more and details. This XPP version of the model reproduces Figure 3C in the paper by default. These model files were submitted by: Dr. Sheng-Nan Wu, Han-Dong Chang, Jiun-Shian Wu Department of Physiology National Cheng Kung University Medical College
Roles of I(A) and morphology in AP prop. in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites (Acker and White 2007)
" ...Using conductance-based models of CA1 pyramidal cells, we show that underlying “traveling wave attractors” control action potential propagation in the apical dendrites. By computing these attractors, we dissect and quantify the effects of IA channels and dendritic morphology on bAP amplitudes. We find that non-uniform activation properties of IA can lead to backpropagation failure similar to that observed experimentally in these cells. ... "
Salamander retinal ganglian cells: morphology influences firing (Sheasby, Fohlmeister 1999)
Nerve impulse entrainment and other excitation and passive phenomena are analyzed for a morphologically diverse and exhaustive data set (n=57) of realistic (3-dimensional computer traced) soma-dendritic tree structures of ganglion cells in the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina.
Selective control of cortical axonal spikes by a slowly inactivating K+ current (Shu et al. 2007)
We discovered a low-threshold, slowly inactivating K+ current, containing Kv1.2 alpha subunits, in axon initial segment, playing a key role in the modulation of spike threshold and spike duration as well as the spike timing in prefrontal cortex layer V pyramidal cell of ferrets and rats. A kd.mod file implements this D current and put it in the axonal model: Neuron_Dcurrent.hoc. Run the model to see the gradual modulation effect over seconds on spike shape.
Serotonergic modulation of Aplysia sensory neurons (Baxter et al 1999)
The present study investigated how the modulation of these currents altered the spike duration and excitability of sensory neurons and examined the relative contributions of PKA- and PKC-mediated effects to the actions of 5-HT. A Hodgkin-Huxley type model was developed that described the ionic conductances in the somata of sensory neurons. The descriptions of these currents and their modulation were based largely on voltageclamp data from sensory neurons. Simulations were preformed with the program SNNAP (Simulator for Neural Networks and Action Potentials). The model was sufficient to replicate empirical data that describes the membrane currents, action potential waveform and excitability as well as their modulation by application of 5-HT, increased levels of adenosine cyclic monophosphate or application of active phorbol esters. The results provide several predictions that warrant additional experimental investigation and illustrate the importance of considering indirect as well as direct effects of modulatory agents on the modulation of membrane currents. See paper for more details.
Shaping of action potentials by different types of BK channels (Jaffe et al., 2011)
Dentate gyrus granule cells highly express the beta4 accessory subunit which confer BK channels with type II properties. The properties of heterologously-expressed BK channels (with and without the beta4 subunit) were used to construct channel models. These were then used to study how they affect single action potentials and trains of spikes in a model dentate gyrus granule cells (based on Aradi and Holmes, 1999).
Simple and accurate Diffusion Approximation algorithm for stochastic ion channels
" ... We derived the (Stochastic Differential Equations) SDE explicitly for any given ion channel kinetic scheme. The resulting generic equations were surprisingly simple and interpretable – allowing an easy, transparent and efficient (Diffusion Approximation) DA implementation, avoiding unnecessary approximations. The algorithm was tested in a voltage clamp simulation and in two different current clamp simulations, yielding the same results as (Markov Chains) MC modeling. Also, the simulation efficiency of this DA method demonstrated considerable superiority over MC methods, except when short time steps or low channel numbers were used."
Simulated light response in rod photoreceptors (Liu and Kourennyi 2004)
We developed a complete computer model of the rod, which accurately reproduced the main features of the light response and allowed us to demonstrate that it was suppression of Kx channels that was essential for slowing SLR and increasing excitability of rods. The results reported in this work further establish the importance of Kx channels in rod photoreceptor function.
Simulating ion channel noise in an auditory brainstem neuron model (Schmerl & McDonnell 2013)
" ... Here we demonstrate that biophysical models of channel noise can give rise to two kinds of recently discovered stochastic facilitation effects in a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model of auditory brainstem neurons. The first, known as slope-based stochastic resonance (SBSR), enables phasic neurons to emit action potentials that can encode the slope of inputs that vary slowly relative to key time constants in the model. The second, known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR), occurs in tonically firing neurons when small levels of noise inhibit tonic firing and replace it with burstlike dynamics. ..." Preprint available at http://arxiv.org/abs/1311.2643
Simulation studies on mechanisms of levetiracetam-mediated inhibition of IK(DR) (Huang et al. 2009)
Levetiracetam (LEV) is an S-enantiomer pyrrolidone derivative with established antiepileptic efficacy in generalized epilepsy and partial epilepsy. However, its effects on ion currents and membrane potential remain largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of LEV on differentiated NG108-15 neurons. ... Simulation studies in a modified Hodgkin-Huxley neuron and network unraveled that the reduction of slowly inactivating IK(DR) resulted in membrane depolarization accompanied by termination of the firing of action potentials in a stochastic manner. Therefore, the inhibitory effects on slowly inactivating IK(DR) (Kv3.1-encoded current) may constitute one of the underlying mechanisms through which LEV affects neuronal activity in vivo.
Simulation study of Andersen-Tawil syndrome (Sung et al 2006)
Patients with Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) mostly have mutations on the KCNJ2 gene producing loss of function or dominant-negative suppression of the inward rectifier K(+) channel Kir2.1. However, clinical manifestations of ATS including dysmorphic features, periodic paralysis (hypo-, hyper-, or normokalemic), long QT, and ventricular arrhythmias (VA) are considerably variable. Using a modified dynamic Luo-Rudy simulation model of cardiac ventricular myocyte, we elucidate the mechanisms of VA in ATS. We adopted a kinetic model of KCNJ2 in which channel block by Mg(+2) and spermine was incorporated. In this study, we attempt to examine the effects of KCNJ2 mutations on the ventricular action potential (AP), single-channel Markovian models were reformulated and incorporated into the dynamic Luo-Rudy model for rapidly and slowly delayed rectifying K(+) currents and KCNJ2 channel. During pacing at 1.0 Hz with [K(+)]o at 5.4 mM, a stepwise 10% reduction of Kir2.1 channel conductance progressively prolonged the terminal repolarization phase of AP along with gradual depolarization of the resting membrane potential (RMP). At 90% reduction, early after- depolarizations (EADs) became inducible and RMP was depolarized to -55.0 mV (control: -90.1 mV) followed by emergence of spontaneous action potentials (SAP). Both EADs and SAP were facilitated by a decrease in [K(+)]o and suppressed by increase in [K(+)]o. beta-adrenergic stimulation enhanced delayed after-depolarizations (DADs) and could also facilitate EADs as well as SAP in the setting of low [K(+)]o and reduced Kir2.1 channel conductance. In conclusion, the spectrum of VA in ATS includes (1) triggered activity mediated by EADs and/or DADs, and (2) abnormal automaticity manifested as SAP. These VA can be aggravated by a decrease in [K(+)]o and beta-adrenergic stimulation, and may potentially induce torsades de pointes and cause sudden death. In patients with ATS, the hypokalemic form of periodic paralysis should have the highest propensity to VA especially during physical activities.
Simulations of motor unit discharge patterns (Powers et al. 2011)
" ... To estimate the potential contributions of PIC (Persistent Inward Current) activation and synaptic input patterns to motor unit discharge patterns, we examined the responses of a set of cable motoneuron models to different patterns of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. The models were first tuned to approximate the current- and voltage-clamp responses of low- and medium-threshold spinal motoneurons studied in decerebrate cats and then driven with different patterns of excitatory and inhibitory inputs. The responses of the models to excitatory inputs reproduced a number of features of human motor unit discharge. However, the pattern of rate modulation was strongly influenced by the temporal and spatial pattern of concurrent inhibitory inputs. Thus, even though PIC activation is likely to exert a strong influence on firing rate modulation, PIC activation in combination with different patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs can produce a wide variety of motor unit discharge patterns."
Site of impulse initiation in a neuron (Moore et al 1983)
Examines the effect of temperature, the taper of the axon hillock, and HH channel density on antidromic spike invasion into the soma and spike initiation under dendritic stimulation.
Sodium channel mutations causing generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures + (Barela et al. 2006)
A novel mutation, R859C, in the Nav1.1 sodium channel was identified in a 4-generation, 33-member Caucasian family with a clinical presentation consistent with GEFS+. The mutation neutralizes a positively charged arginine in the domain 2 S4 voltage sensor of the Nav1.1 channel Ą subunit. When the mutation was placed in the rat Nav1.1 channel and expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the mutant channel displayed a positive shift in the voltage-dependence of sodium channel activation, slower recovery from slow inactivation, and lower levels of current compared to the wild-type channel. Computational analysis suggests that neurons expressing the mutant channel have higher thresholds for firing a single action potential and for firing multiple action potentials, along with decreased repetitive firing. Therefore, this mutation should lead to decreased neuronal excitability, in contrast to most previous GEFS+ sodium channel mutations that have changes predicted to increase neuronal firing.
Sodium currents activate without a delay (Baranauskas and Martina 2006)
Hodgkin and Huxley established that sodium currents in the squid giant axons activate after a delay, which is explained by the model of a channel with three identical independent gates that all have to open before the channel can pass current (the HH model). It is assumed that this model can adequately describe the sodium current activation time course in all mammalian central neurons, although there is no experimental evidence to support such a conjecture. We performed high temporal resolution studies of sodium currents gating in three types of central neurons. ... These results can be explained by a model with two closed states and one open state. ... This model captures all major properties of the sodium current activation. In addition, the proposed model reproduces the observed action potential shape more accurately than the traditional HH model. See paper for more and details.
Spectral method and high-order finite differences for nonlinear cable (Omurtag and Lytton 2010)
We use high-order approximation schemes for the space derivatives in the nonlinear cable equation and investigate the behavior of numerical solution errors by using exact solutions, where available, and grid convergence. The space derivatives are numerically approximated by means of differentiation matrices. A flexible form for the injected current is used that can be adjusted smoothly from a very broad to a narrow peak, which leads, for the passive cable, to a simple, exact solution. We provide comparisons with exact solutions in an unbranched passive cable, the convergence of solutions with progressive refinement of the grid in an active cable, and the simulation of spike initiation in a biophysically realistic single-neuron model.
Spike Initiation in Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons (Mainen et al 1995)
This model reproduces figure 3A from the paper Mainen ZF, Joerges J, Huguenard JR, Sejnowski TJ (1995). Please see the paper for detail whose full text is available at http://www.cnl.salk.edu/~zach/methods.html Email Zach Mainen for questions: mainen@cshl.org
Spike propagation and bouton activation in terminal arborizations (Luscher, Shiner 1990)
Action potential propagation in axons with bifurcations involving short collaterals with synaptic boutons has been simulated ... The architecture of the terminal arborizations has a profound effect on the activation pattern of synapses, suggesting that terminal arborizations not only distribute neural information to postsynaptic cells but may also be able to process neural information presynaptically. Please see paper for details.
Spike propagation in dendrites with stochastic ion channels (Diba et al. 2006)
"We investigate the effects of the stochastic nature of ion channels on the faithfulness, precision and reproducibility of electrical signal transmission in weakly active, dendritic membrane under in vitro conditions. ... We numerically simulate the effects of stochastic ion channels on the forward and backward propagation of dendritic spikes in Monte-Carlo simulations on a reconstructed layer 5 pyramidal neuron. We report that in most instances there is little variation in timing or amplitude for a single BPAP, while variable backpropagation can occur for trains of action potentials. Additionally, we find that the generation and forward propagation of dendritic Ca2+ spikes are susceptible to channel variability. This indicates limitations on computations that depend on the precise timing of Ca2+ spikes."
Spike repolarization in axon collaterals (Foust et al. 2011)
Voltage sensing dye experiments and simulations characterize the location and re-polarizing function of Kv1 channels in cortical neurons. "... (the papers) results indicate that action potential-induced synaptic transmission may operate through a mix of analog–digital transmission owing to the properties of Kv1 channels in axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons."
Spike Response Model simulator (Jolivet et al. 2004, 2006, 2008)
The Spike Response Model (SRM) optimized on the experimental data in the Single-Neuron modelling Competition ( www.incf.org/community/competitions ) for edition 2007 and edition 2008. The Spike Response Model is a simplified model of neuronal excitability where current linearly integrates to an artificial threshold. After the spike, the threshold is augmented and the voltage follows a voltage kernel that is the average voltage trace during and after a spike. The parameters were chosen to best fit the observed spike times with a method outlined in Jolivet et al. (2006).
Spike trains in Hodgkin–Huxley model and ISIs of acupuncture manipulations (Wang et al. 2008)
The Hodgkin-Huxley equations (HH) are parameterized by a number of parameters and shows a variety of qualitatively different behaviors depending on the parameter values. Under stimulation of an external periodic voltage, the ISIs (interspike intervals) of a HH model are investigated in this work, while the frequency of the voltage is taken as the controlling parameter. As well-known, the science of acupuncture and moxibustion is an important component of Traditional Chinese Medicine with a long history. Although there are a number of different acupuncture manipulations, the method for distinguishing them is rarely investigated. With the idea of ISI, we study the electrical signal time series at the spinal dorsal horn produced by three different acupuncture manipulations in Zusanli point and present an effective way to distinguish them.
Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
Spinal Motor Neuron (Dodge, Cooley 1973)
Dodge & Cooley (1973) "Action Potential of the Motorneuron" IBM J. Res. Develop. May 219--229
Spinal Motor Neuron (McIntyre et al 2002)
Simulation of peripheral nervous system (PNS) mylelinated axon. This model is described in detail in: McIntyre CC, Richardson AG, and Grill WM.(2002)
Spine fusion and branching effects synaptic response (Rusakov et al 1996, 1997)
This compartmental model of a hippocampal granule cell has spinous synapses placed on the second-order dendrites. Changes in shape and connectivity of the spines usually does not effect the synaptic response of the cell unless active conductances are incorporated into the spine membrane (e.g. voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels). With active conductances, spines can generate spike-like events. We showed that changes like fusion and branching, or in fact any increase in the equivalent spine neck resistance, could trigger a dramatic increase in the spine's influence on the dendritic shaft potential.
Spontaneous firing caused by stochastic channel gating (Chow, White 1996)
NEURON implementation of model of stochastic channel gating, resulting in spontaneous firing. Qualitatively reproduces the phenomena described in the reference.
Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (LabAXON)
The classic HH model of squid axon membrane implemented in LabAXON. Hodgkin, A.L., Huxley, A.F. (1952)
Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (NEURON)
The classic HH model of squid axon membrane implemented in NEURON. Hodgkin, A.L., Huxley, A.F. (1952)
Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (SBML, XPP, other)
An SBML (and related XPP and other formats) implementation of the classic HH paper is available in the BIOMODELS database http://www.ebi.ac.uk/compneur-srv/biomodels-main/publ-model.do?mid=BIOMD0000000020. Clicking on the XPP link will download an executable version of the HH model.
Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (SNNAP)
The classic HH model of squid axon membrane implemented in SNNAP. Hodgkin, A.L., Huxley, A.F. (1952)
Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) used in (Chen et al 2010) (R language)
"... Previous work showed that magnetic electrical field-induced antinoceptive action is mediated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents. In this study, a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, in which TRP-like current (I-TRP) was incorporated, was implemented to predict the firing behavior of action potentials (APs), as the model neuron was exposed to sinusoidal changes in externally-applied voltage. ... Our simulation results suggest that modulation of TRP-like channels functionally expressed in small-diameter peripheral sensory neurons should be an important mechanism through which it can contribute to the firing pattern of APs."
Squid axon: Bifurcation analysis of mode-locking (Lee & Kim 2006) (Gangal et al. under preparation)
The model was built with the purpose of finding mode lockings between the input sinusoidal current frequency and the output frequency. Phase plase plane analysis, spike statistics, mode locking formulation etc. can be done with the help of the model. Any additional functionality can be added as the base code return the correct action potential values.
State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost (Hallermann et al., 2012)
With this model of a layer 5 pyramidal neuron the state and location dependence of the ATP usage and the metabolic efficiency of action potentials can be analyzed. Model parameters were constrained by direct subcellular recordings at dendritic, somatic and axonal compartments.
STDP depends on dendritic synapse location (Letzkus et al. 2006)
This model was published in Letzkus, Kampa & Stuart (2006) J Neurosci 26(41):10420-9. The simulation creates several plots showing voltage and NMDA current and conductance changes at different apical dendritic locations in layer 5 pyramidal neurons during STDP induction protocols. Created by B. Kampa (2006).
Stochastic 3D model of neonatal rat spinal motoneuron (Ostroumov 2007)
" ... Although existing models of motoneurons have indicated the distributed role of certain conductances in regulating firing, it is unclear how the spatial distribution of certain currents is ultimately shaping motoneuron output. Thus, it would be helpful to build a bridge between histological and electrophysiological data. The present report is based on the construction of a 3D motoneuron model based on available parameters applicable to the neonatal spinal cord. ..."
Stochastic calcium mechanisms cause dendritic calcium spike variability (Anwar et al. 2013)
" ... In single Purkinje cells, spontaneous and synaptically evoked dendritic calcium bursts come in a variety of shapes with a variable number of spikes. The mechanisms causing this variability have never been investigated thoroughly. In this study, a detailed computational model employing novel simulation routines is applied to identify the roles that stochastic ion channels, spatial arrangements of ion channels and stochastic intracellular calcium have towards producing calcium burst variability. … Our findings suggest that stochastic intracellular calcium mechanisms play a crucial role in dendritic calcium spike generation and are, therefore, an essential consideration in studies of neuronal excitability and plasticity."
Stochastic ion channels and neuronal morphology (Cannon et al. 2010)
"... We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. ..." The code is downloadable and more information is available at http://www.psics.org/
Stochastic versions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations (Goldwyn, Shea-Brown 2011)
A Matlab gui for simulating different channel noise models using the Hodgkin-Huxley equations. Methods provided and reviewed in Goldwyn and Shea-Brown (2011) are: current noise, subunit noise, conductance noise, and Markov chain, as well as the standard deterministic Hodgkin-Huxley model.
Stochastic versions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations (Goldwyn, Shea-Brown 2011) (pylab)
A pylab version from Alan Leggitt for simulating different channel noise models using the Hodgkin-Huxley equations. Methods provided and reviewed in Goldwyn and Shea-Brown (2011) are: current noise, subunit noise, conductance noise, and Markov chain, as well as the standard deterministic Hodgkin-Huxley model.
Striatal Output Neuron (Mahon, Deniau, Charpier, Delord 2000)
Striatal output neurons (SONs) integrate glutamatergic synaptic inputs originating from the cerebral cortex. In vivo electrophysiological data have shown that a prior depolarization of SONs induced a short-term (1 sec)increase in their membrane excitability, which facilitated the ability of corticostriatal synaptic potentials to induce firing. Here we propose, using a computational model of SONs, that the use-dependent, short-term increase in the responsiveness of SONs mainly results from the slow kinetics of a voltage-dependent, slowly inactivating potassium A-current. This mechanism confers on SONs a form of intrinsic short-term memory that optimizes the synaptic input–output relationship as a function of their past activation.
Submyelin Potassium accumulation in Subthalamic neuron (STN) axons (Bellinger et al. 2008)
"To better understand the direct effects of DBS (Deep brain stimulation) on central neurons, a computational model of a myelinated axon has been constructed which includes the effects of K+ accumulation within the peri-axonal space. Using best estimates of anatomic and electrogenic model parameters for in vivo STN axons, the model predicts a functional block along the axon due to K+ accumulation in the submyelin space. ... These results suggest that therapeutic DBS of the STN likely results in a functional block for many STN axons, although a subset of STN axons may also be activated at the stimulating frequency. "
Subthreshold inact. of K channels modulates APs in bitufted interneurons (Korngreen et al 2005)
... In this study we show that in bitufted interneurones from layer 2/3 of the somatosensory cortex, the height and width of APs recorded at the soma are sensitive to changes in the resting membrane potential, suggesting subthreshold activity of voltage-gated conductances. Attributes of K+ currents examined in nucleated patches revealed a fast subthreshold-inactivating K+ conductance (Kf ) and a slow suprathreshold-inactivating K+ conductance (Ks ). Simulations of these K+ conductances, incorporated into a Hodgkin–Huxley-type model, suggested that during a single AP or during low frequency trains of APs, subthreshold inactivation of Kf was the primary modulator of AP shape, whereas during trains of APs the shape was governed to a larger degree by Ks resulting in the generation of smaller and broader APs. ... Compartmental simulation of the back-propagating AP suggested a mechanism for the modulation of the back-propagating AP height and width by subthreshold activation of Kf . We speculate that this signal may modulate retrograde GABA release and consequently depression of synaptic efficacy of excitatory input from neighbouring pyramidal neurones.
Superior paraolivary nucleus neuron (Kopp-Scheinpflug et al. 2011)
This is a model of neurons in the brainstem superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN), which produce very salient offset firing during sound stimulation. Rebound offset firing is triggered by IPSPs coming from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). This model shows that AP firing can emerge from inhibition through integration of large IPSPs, driven by an extremely negative chloride reversal potential, combined with a large hyperpolarization- activated non-specific cationic current (IH), with a secondary contribution from a T-type calcium conductance (ITCa). As a result, tiny gaps in sound stimuli of just 3-4ms can elicit reliable APs that signal such brief offsets.
Sympathetic Preganglionic Neurone (Briant et al. 2014)
A model of a sympathetic preganglionic neurone of muscle vasoconstrictor-type.
Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
Synaptic integration in a model of granule cells (Gabbiani et al 1994)
We have developed a compartmental model of a turtle cerebellar granule cell consisting of 13 compartments that represent the soma and 4 dendrites. We used this model to investigate the synaptic integration of mossy fiber inputs in granule cells. See reference or abstract at PubMed link below for more information.
Synaptic integration in tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Larkum et al. 2009)
Simulations used in the paper. Voltage responses to current injections in different tuft locations; NMDA and calcium spike generation. Summation of multiple input distribution.
Synergistic inhibitory action of oxcarbazepine on INa and IK (Huang et al. 2008)
"Oxcarbazepine (OXC), one of the newer anti-epileptic drugs, has been demonstrating its efficacy on wide-spectrum neuropsychiatric disorders. ... With the aid of patch-clamp technology, we first investigated the effects of OXC on ion currents in NG108-15 neuronal cells differentiated with cyclic AMP. We found OXC ... caused a reversible reduction in the amplitude of voltage-gated Na+ current (INa) ... and produce(d) a significant prolongation in the recovery of INa inactivation. ... Moreover, OXC could suppress the amplitude of delayed rectifier K+ current (IK(DR)), with no effect on M-type K+ current (IK(M)). ... Furthermore, the simulations, based on hippocampal pyramidal neurons (Pinsky-Rinzel model) and a network of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, were analysed to investigate the effect of OXC on action potentials. Taken together, our results suggest that the synergistic blocking effects on INa and IK(DR) may contribute to the underlying mechanisms through which OXC affects neuronal function in vivo."
Temperature-Sensitive conduction at axon branch points (Westerfield et al 1978)
Propagation of impulses through branching regions of squid axons was examined experimentally and with computer simulations. The ratio of postbranch/prebranch diameters at which propagation failed was very sensitive to temperature.
Thalamic neuron: Modeling rhythmic neuronal activity (Meuth et al. 2005)
The authors use an in vitro cell model of a single acutely isolated thalamic neuron in the NEURON simulation environment to address and discuss questions in an undergraduate course. Topics covered include passive electrical properties, composition of action potentials, trains of action potentials, multicompartment modeling, and research topics. The paper includes detailed instructions on how to run the simulations in the appendix.
Thalamic reticular neurons: the role of Ca currents (Destexhe et al 1996)
The experiments and modeling reported in this paper show how intrinsic bursting properties of RE cells may be explained by dendritic calcium currents.
The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in a hippocampal neuron (Huang et al. 2007)
"Hyperglycemia-related neuronal excitability and epileptic seizures are not uncommon in clinical practice. However, their underlying mechanism remains elusive. ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels are found in many excitable cells, including cardiac myocytes, pancreatic beta cells, and neurons. These channels provide a link between the electrical activity of cell membranes and cellular metabolism. We investigated the effects of higher extracellular glucose on hippocampal K(ATP) channel activities and neuronal excitability. The cell-attached patch-clamp configuration on cultured hippocampal cells and a novel multielectrode recording system on hippocampal slices were employed. In addition, a simulation modeling hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons (Pinsky-Rinzel model) was analyzed to investigate the role of K(ATP) channels in the firing of simulated action potentials. ..."
The subcellular distribution of T-type Ca2+ channels in LGN interneurons (Allken et al. 2014)
" ...To study the relationship between the (Ca2+ channel) T-distribution and several (LGN interneuron) IN response properties, we here run a series of simulations where we vary the T-distribution in a multicompartmental IN model with a realistic morphology. We find that the somatic response to somatic current injection is facilitated by a high T-channel density in the soma-region. Conversely, a high T-channel density in the distal dendritic region is found to facilitate dendritic signalling in both the outward direction (increases the response in distal dendrites to somatic input) and the inward direction (the soma responds stronger to distal synaptic input). ..."
Tight junction model of CNS myelinated axons (Devaux and Gow 2008)
Two models are included: 1) a myelinated axon is represented by an equivalent circuit with a double cable design but includes a tight junction in parallel with the myelin membrane RC circuit (called double cable model, DCM). 2) a myelinated axon is represented by an equivalent circuit with a double cable design but includes a tight junction in series with the myelin RC circuit (called tight junction model, TJM). These models have been used to simulate data from compound action potentials measured in mouse optic nerve from Claudin 11-null mice in Fig. 6 of: Devaux, J.J. & Gow, A. (2008) Tight Junctions Potentiate The Insulative Properties Of Small CNS Myelinated Axons. J Cell Biol 183, 909-921.
Tonic neuron in spinal lamina I: prolongation of subthreshold depol. (Prescott and De Koninck 2005)
Model demonstrates mechanism whereby two kinetically distinct inward currents act synergistically to prolong subthreshold depolarization. The important currents are a persistent Na current (with fast kinetics) and a persistent Ca current (with slower kinetics). Model also includes a slow K current and transient Ca current, in addition to standard HH currents. Model parameters are set to values used in Fig. 8A. Simulation shows prolonged depolarizations in response to two brief stimuli.
Touch Sensory Cells (T Cells) of the Leech (Cataldo et al. 2004) (Scuri et al. 2007)
Bursts of spikes in leech T cells produce an AHP, which results from activation of a Na+/K+ pump and a Ca2+-dependent K+ current. Activity-dependent increases in the AHP are believed to induce conduction block of spikes in several regions of the neuron, which in turn, may decrease presynaptic invasion of spikes and thereby decrease transmitter release. To explore this possibility, we used the neurosimulator SNNAP to develop a multi-compartmental model of the T cell. Each compartment was modeled as an equivalent electrical circuit, in which some currents were regulated by intracellular Ca2+ and Na+. The membrane model consisted of a membrane capacitance (Cm), for which we used the value 1 uF/cm2, in parallel with two inward currents (Na+ and Ca2+), two K+ currents, a leak current and pump current. The model incorporated empirical data that describe the geometry of the cell and activity-dependent changes of the AHP (see paper for details). Simulations indicated that at some branching points, activity-dependent increases of the AHP reduced the number of spikes transmitted from the minor receptive field to the soma and beyond. These results suggest that the AHP can regulate spike conduction within the presynaptic arborizations of the cell and could in principle contribute to the synaptic depression that is correlated with increases in the AHP.
Understanding odor information segregation in the olfactory bulb by MC/TCs (Polese et al. 2014)
Odor identification is one of the main tasks of the olfactory system. It is performed almost independently from the concentration of the odor providing a robust recognition. This capacity to ignore concentration information does not preclude the olfactory system from estimating concentration itself. Significant experimental evidence has indicated that the olfactory system is able to infer simultaneously odor identity and intensity. However, it is still unclear at what level or levels of the olfactory pathway this segregation of information occurs. In this work, we study whether this odor information segregation is performed at the input stage of the olfactory bulb: the glomerular layer.
Using Strahler’s analysis to reduce realistic models (Marasco et al, 2013)
Building on our previous work (Marasco et al., (2012)), we present a general reduction method based on Strahler's analysis of neuron morphologies. We show that, without any fitting or tuning procedures, it is possible to map any morphologically and biophysically accurate neuron model into an equivalent reduced version. Using this method for Purkinje cells, we demonstrate how run times can be reduced up to 200-fold, while accurately taking into account the effects of arbitrarily located and activated synaptic inputs. Reference: Marasco A, Limongiello A, & Migliore M (2013), Using Strahler’s analysis to reduce up to 200-fold the run time of realistic neuron models, Sci. Rep. 3, 2934; DOI:10.1038/srep02934 in press.
Ventricular cell model (Guinea-pig-type) (Luo, Rudy 1991, +10 other papers!) (C++)
A mathematical model of the membrane action potential of the mammalian ventricular cell is introduced. The model is based, whenever possible, on recent single-cell and single-channel data and incorporates the possibility of changing extracellular potassium concentration [K]o. ... The results are consistent with recent experimental observations, and the model simulations relate these phenomena to the underlying ionic channel kinetics. See paper for more and details.
Ventricular cell model (Luo Rudy dynamic model) (Luo Rudy 1994) used in (Wang et al 2006) (XPP)
A mathematical model of the membrane action potential of the mammalian ventricular cell introduced in Luo, Rudy 1991 and used in Wang et al 2006 is made available here in XPP. The model is based, whenever possible, on recent single-cell and single-channel data and incorporates the possibility of changing extracellular potassium concentration [K]o. ... The results are consistent with recent experimental observations, and the model simulations relate these phenomena to the underlying ionic channel kinetics. See papers for more and details.
Vomeronasal sensory neuron (Shimazaki et al 2006)
NEURON model files from the papers: Shimazaki et al, Chem. Senses, epub ahead of print (2006) Electrophysiological properties and modeling of murine vomeronasal sensory neurons in acute slice preparations. The model reproduces quantitatively the experimentally observed firing rates of these neurons under a wide range of input currents.
Xenopus Myelinated Neuron (Frankenhaeuser, Huxley 1964)
Frankenhaeuser, B. and Huxley, A. F. (1964), The action potential in the myelinated nerve fiber of Xenopus Laevis as computed on the basis of voltage clamp data. J. Physiol. 171: 302-315. See README file for more information.
Zonisamide-induced inhibition of the firing of APs in hippocampal neurons (Huang et al. 2007)
Zonisamide (ZNS), a synthetic benzisoxazole derivative, has been used as an alternative choice in the treatment of epilepsy with a better efficacy and safety profile. However, little is known regarding the mechanism of ZNS actions on ion currents in neurons. We thus investigated its effect on ion currents in differentiated hippocampal 19-7 cells. The ZNS (30 ƒÝM) reversibly increased the amplitude of K+ outward currents and paxilline (1 ƒÝM) was effective in suppressing ZNS-induced increase of K+ outward currents. In inside-out configuration, ZNS (30 ƒÝM) applied to the intracellular face of the membrane did not alter single-channel conductance; however, it did enhance the activity of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels primarily by decreasing mean closed time. The EC50 value for ZNS-stimulated BKCa channels was 34 ƒÝM. This drug caused a left shift in the activation curve of BKCa channels with no change in the gating charge of these channels. ZNS at a concentration greater than 100 ƒÝM also reduced the amplitude of A-type K+ current in these cells. A simulation modeling based on hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons (Pinsky-Rinzel model) was also analyzed to investigate the inhibitory effect of ZNS on the firing of simulated action potentials. Taken together, this study suggests that in hippocampal neurons, during the exposure to ZNS, the ZNS-mediated effects on BKCa channels and IA could be one of the ionic mechanisms through which it affects neuronal excitability.


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