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1
A network model of tail withdrawal in Aplysia (White et al 1993) 
 The contributions of monosynaptic and polysynaptic circuitry to the tail-withdrawal reflex in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica were assessed by the use of physiologically based neural network models. Effects of monosynaptic circuitry were examined by the use of a two-layer network model with four sensory neurons in the input layer and one motor neuron in the output layer. Results of these simulations indicated that the monosynaptic circuit could not account fully for long-duration responses of tail motor neurons elicited by tail stimulation. A three-layer network model was constructed by interposing a layer of two excitatory interneurons between the input and output layers of the two-layer network model. The three-layer model could account for long-duration responses in motor neurons. Sensory neurons are a known site of plasticity in Aplysia. Synaptic plasticity at more than one locus modified dramatically the input-output relationship of the three-layer network model. This feature gave the model redundancy in its plastic properties and points to the possibility of distributed memory in the circuitry mediating withdrawal reflexes in Aplysia. Please see paper for more results and details.
2
Activity dependent changes in motoneurones (Dai Y et al 2002, Gardiner et al 2002) 
 These two papers review various experimental papers and examine the effects of activity on motoneurons in a similar 5 compartment model with 10 active conductances. Included are slow (S) and fast (F) type and fast fatigue resistant (FR) and fast fatigable (FF) models corresponding to the types of motoneurons. See papers for more and details.
3
Afferent Integration in the NAcb MSP Cell (Wolf et al. 2005) 
 "We describe a computational model of the principal cell in the nucleus accumbens (NAcb), the medium spiny projection (MSP) neuron. The model neuron, constructed in NEURON, includes all of the known ionic currents in these cells and receives synaptic input from simulated spike trains via NMDA, AMPA, and GABAA receptors. ... results suggest that afferent information integration by the NAcb MSP cell may be compromised by pathology in which the NMDA current is altered or modulated, as has been proposed in both schizophrenia and addiction."
4
Amyloid beta (IA block) effects on a model CA1 pyramidal cell (Morse et al. 2010) 
 The model simulations provide evidence oblique dendrites in CA1 pyramidal neurons are susceptible to hyper-excitability by amyloid beta block of the transient K+ channel, IA. See paper for details.
5
Axonal NaV1.6 Sodium Channels in AP Initiation of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons (Royeck et al. 2008) 
 "... We show that the Na+ channel NaV1.6 displays a striking aggregation at the AIS of cortical neurons. ... In combination with simulations using a realistic computer model of a CA1 pyramidal cell, our results imply that a hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of activation of AIS NaV1.6 channels is important both in determining spike threshold and localizing spike initiation to the AIS. ... These results suggest that NaV1.6 subunits at the AIS contribute significantly to its role as spike trigger zone and shape repetitive discharge properties of CA1 neurons."
6
Biophysically detailed model of the mouse sino-atrial node cell (Kharche et al. 2011) 
 This model is developed to study the role of various electrophysiological mechanisms in generating cardiac pacemaking action potentials (APs).The model incorporates membrane ionic currents and intracellular mechanisms contributing to spontaneous mouse SAN APs. The model was validated by testing the functional roles of individual membrane currents in one and multiple parameter analyses.The roles of intracellular Ca2+-handling mechanisms on cardiac pacemaking were also investigated in the model.
7
Burst induced synaptic plasticity in Apysia sensorimotor neurons (Phares et al 2003) 
 The Aplysia sensorimotor synapse is a key site of plasticity for several simple forms of learning. Intracellular stimulation of sensory neurons to fire a burst of action potentials at 10 Hz for 1 sec led to significant homosynaptic depression of postsynaptic responses. During the burst, the steady-state depressed phase of the postsynaptic response, which was only 20% of the initial EPSP of the burst, still contributed to firing the motor neuron. To explore the functional contribution of transient homosynaptic depression to the response of the motor neuron, computer simulations of the sensorimotor synapse with and without depression were compared. Depression allowed the motor neuron to produce graded responses over a wide range of presynaptic input strength. Thus, synaptic depression increased the dynamic range of the sensorimotor synapse and can, in principle, have a profound effect on information processing. Please see paper for results and details.
8
Bursting activity of neuron R15 in Aplysia (Canavier et al 1991, Butera et al 1995) 
 An equivalent circuit model of the R15 bursting neuron in Aplysia has been combined with a fluid compartment model, resulting in a model that incorporates descriptions of most of the membrane ion channels that are known to exist in the somata of R15, as well as providing a Ca2+ balance on the cell. ... (from the second paper) we have implemented proposed mechanisms for the modulation of two ionic currents (IR and ISI) that play key roles in regulating its spontaneous electrical activity. The model was sufficient to simulate a wide range of endogenous activity in the presence of various concentrations of 5-HT or DA. See papers for more and details.
9
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Lazarewicz et al 2002) 
 The model shows how using a CA1-like distribution of active dendritic conductances in a CA3 morphology results in dendritic initiation of spikes during a burst.
10
CA3 Pyramidal Neuron (Migliore et al 1995) 
 Model files from the paper: M. Migliore, E. Cook, D.B. Jaffe, D.A. Turner and D. Johnston, Computer simulations of morphologically reconstructed CA3 hippocampal neurons, J. Neurophysiol. 73, 1157-1168 (1995). Demonstrates how the same cell could be bursting or non bursting according to the Ca-independent conductance densities. Includes calculation of intracellular Calcium. Instructions are provided in the below README file. Contact michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
11
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Safiulina et al. 2010) 
 In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. To compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in postnatal development, a realistic model was constructed taking into account the different biophysical properties of these synapses.
12
Calcium influx during striatal upstates (Evans et al. 2013) 
 "... To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the relationship between calcium and AP timing, we have developed a realistic biophysical model of a medium spiny neuron (MSN). ... Using this model, we found that either the slow inactivation of dendritic sodium channels (NaSI) or the calcium inactivation of voltage-gated calcium channels (CDI) can cause high calcium corresponding to early APs and lower calcium corresponding to later APs. We found that only CDI can account for the experimental observation that sensitivity to AP timing is dependent on NMDA receptors. Additional simulations demonstrated a mechanism by which MSNs can dynamically modulate their sensitivity to AP timing and show that sensitivity to specifically timed pre- and postsynaptic pairings (as in spike timing-dependent plasticity protocols) is altered by the timing of the pairing within the upstate. …"
13
Complex CA1-neuron to study AP initiation (Wimmer et al. 2010) 
 Complex model of a pyramidal CA1-neuron, adapted from Royeck, M., et al. Role of axonal NaV1.6 sodium channels in action potential initiation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Journal of neurophysiology 100, 2361-2380 (2008). It contains a biophysically realistic morphology comprising 265 compartments (829 segments) and 15 different distributed Ca2+- and/or voltage-dependent conductances.
14
Dendritic L-type Ca currents in motoneurons (Carlin et al 2000) 
 A component of recorded currents demonstrated kinetics consistent with a current originating at a site spatially segregated from the soma. In response to step commands this component was seen as a late-onset, low amplitude persistent current whilst in response to depolarizing-repolarizing ramp commands a low voltage clockwise current hysteresis was recorded. Simulations using a neuromorphic motoneuron model could reproduce these currents only if a noninactivating calcium conductance was placed in the dendritic compartments.
15
Dendritic Na+ spike initiation and backpropagation of APs in active dendrites (Nevian et al. 2007) 
 NEURON model used to create simulations shown in figure 6 of the paper. The model includes two point processes; one for dendritic spike initiation and the other for somatic action potential generation. The effect of filtering by imperfect recording electrode can be examined in somatic and dendritic locations.
16
Dentate gyrus granule cell: calcium and calcium-dependent conductances (Aradi and Holmes 1999) 
 We have constructed a detailed model of a hippocampal dentate granule (DG) cell that includes nine different channel types. Channel densities and distributions were chosen to reproduce reported physiological responses observed in normal solution and when blockers were applied. The model was used to explore the contribution of each channel type to spiking behavior with particular emphasis on the mechanisms underlying postspike events. ... The model was used to predict changes in channel densities that could lead to epileptogenic burst discharges and to predict the effect of altered buffering capacity on firing behavior. We conclude that the clustered spatial distributions of calcium related channels, the presence of slow delayed rectifier potassium currents in dendrites, and calcium buffering properties, together, might explain the resistance of DG cells to the development of epileptogenic burst discharges.
17
Differential modulation of pattern and rate in a dopamine neuron model (Canavier and Landry 2006) 
 "A stylized, symmetric, compartmental model of a dopamine neuron in vivo shows how rate and pattern can be modulated either concurrently or differentially. If two or more parameters in the model are varied concurrently, the baseline firing rate and the extent of bursting become decorrelated, which provides an explanation for the lack of a tight correlation in vivo and is consistent with some independence of the mechanisms that generate baseline firing rates versus bursting. ..." See paper for more and details.
18
Enhanced Excitability in Hermissenda: modulation by 5-HT (Cai et al 2003) 
 Serotonin (5-HT) applied to the exposed but otherwise intact nervous system results in enhanced excitability of Hermissenda type-B photoreceptors. Several ion currents in the type-B photoreceptors are modulated by 5-HT, including the A-type K+ current (IK,A), sustained Ca2+ current (ICa,S), Ca-dependent K+ current (IK,Ca), and a hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier current (Ih). In this study,we developed a computational model that reproduces physiological characteristics of type B photoreceptors, e.g. resting membrane potential, dark-adapted spike activity, spike width, and the amplitude difference between somatic and axonal spikes. We then used the model to investigate the contribution of different ion currents modulated by 5-HT to the magnitudes of enhanced excitability produced by 5-HT. See paper for results and more details.
19
Homosynaptic plasticity in the tail withdrawal circuit (TWC) of Aplysia (Baxter and Byrne 2006) 
 The tail-withdrawal circuit of Aplysia provides a useful model system for investigating synaptic dynamics. Sensory neurons within the circuit manifest several forms of synaptic plasticity. Here, we developed a model of the circuit and investigated the ways in which depression (DEP) and potentiation (POT) contributed to information processing. DEP limited the amount of motor neuron activity that could be elicited by the monosynaptic pathway alone. POT within the monosynaptic pathway did not compensate for DEP. There was, however, a synergistic interaction between POT and the polysynaptic pathway. This synergism extended the dynamic range of the network, and the interplay between DEP and POT made the circuit respond preferentially to long-duration, low-frequency inputs.
20
Impact of dendritic atrophy on intrinsic and synaptic excitability (Narayanan & Chattarji, 2010) 
 These simulations examined the atrophy induced changes in electrophysiological properties of CA3 pyramidal neurons. We found these neurons change from bursting to regular spiking as atrophy increases. Region-specific atrophy induced region-specific increases in synaptic excitability in a passive dendritic tree. All dendritic compartments of an atrophied neuron had greater synaptic excitability and a larger voltage transfer to the soma than the control neuron.
21
Interacting synaptic conductances during, distorting, voltage clamp (Poleg-Polsky and Diamond 2011) 
 This simulation examines the accuracy of the voltage clamp technique in detecting the excitatory and the inhibitory components of the synaptic drive.
22
Ionic mechanisms of bursting in CA3 pyramidal neurons (Xu and Clancy 2008) 
 "... We present a single-compartment model of a CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neuron based on recent experimental data. We then use the model to determine the roles of primary depolarizing currents in burst generation. The single compartment model incorporates accurate representations of sodium (Na+) channels (NaV1.1) and T-type calcium (Ca2+) channel subtypes (CaV3.1, CaV3.2, and CaV3.3). Our simulations predict the importance of Na+ and T-type Ca2+ channels in hippocampal pyramidal cell bursting and reveal the distinct contribution of each subtype to burst morphology. We also performed fastslow analysis in a reduced comparable model, which shows that our model burst is generated as a result of the interaction of two slow variables, the T-type Ca2+ channel activation gate and the Ca2+-dependent potassium (K+) channel activation gate. The model reproduces a range of experimentally observed phenomena including afterdepolarizing potentials, spike widening at the end of the burst, and rebound. Finally, we use the model to simulate the effects of two epilepsy-linked mutations: R1648H in NaV1.1 and C456S in CaV3.2, both of which result in increased cellular excitability."
23
Mathematical model for windup (Aguiar et al. 2010) 
 "Windup is characterized as a frequency-dependent increase in the number of evoked action potentials in dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical stimulation of afferent C-fibers. ... The approach presented here relies on mathematical and computational analysis to study the mechanism(s) underlying windup. From experimentally obtained windup profiles, we extract the time scale of the facilitation mechanisms that may support the characteristics of windup. Guided by these values and using simulations of a biologically realistic compartmental model of a wide dynamic range (WDR) neuron, we are able to assess the contribution of each mechanism for the generation of action potentials windup. ..."
24
Modeling interactions in Aplysia neuron R15 (Yu et al 2004) 
 "The biophysical properties of neuron R15 in Aplysia endow it with the ability to express multiple modes of oscillatory electrical activity, such as beating and bursting. Previous modeling studies examined the ways in which membrane conductances contribute to the electrical activity of R15 and the ways in which extrinsic modulatory inputs alter the membrane conductances by biochemical cascades and influence the electrical activity. The goals of the present study were to examine the ways in which electrical activity influences the biochemical cascades and what dynamical properties emerge from the ongoing interactions between electrical activity and these cascades." See paper for more and details.
25
Modelling reduced excitability in aged CA1 neurons as a Ca-dependent process (Markaki et al. 2005) 
 "We use a multi-compartmental model of a CA1 pyramidal cell to study changes in hippocampal excitability that result from aging-induced alterations in calcium-dependent membrane mechanisms. The model incorporates N- and L-type calcium channels which are respectively coupled to fast and slow afterhyperpolarization potassium channels. Model parameters are calibrated using physiological data. Computer simulations reproduce the decreased excitability of aged CA1 cells, which results from increased internal calcium accumulation, subsequently larger postburst slow afterhyperpolarization, and enhanced spike frequency adaptation. We find that aging-induced alterations in CA1 excitability can be modelled with simple coupling mechanisms that selectively link specific types of calcium channels to specific calcium-dependent potassium channels."
26
Nodose sensory neuron (Schild et al. 1994, Schild and Kunze 1997) 
 This is a simulink implementation of the model described in Schild et al. 1994, and Schild and Kunze 1997 papers on Nodose sensory neurons. These papers describe the sensitivity these models have to their parameters and the match of the models to experimental data.
27
O-LM interneuron model (Lawrence et al. 2006) 
 Exploring the kinetics and distribution of the muscarinic potassium channel, IM, in 2 O-LM interneuron morphologies. Modulation of the ion channel by drugs such as XE991 (antagonist) and retigabine (agonist) are simulated in the models to examine the role of IM in spiking properties.
28
Rat phrenic motor neuron (Amini et al 2004) 
 We have developed a model for the rat phrenic motor neuron (PMN) that robustly replicates many experimentally observed behaviors of PMNs in response to pharmacological, ionic, and electrical perturbations using a single set of parameters.
29
Rat subthalamic projection neuron (Gillies and Willshaw 2006) 
 A computational model of the rat subthalamic nucleus projection neuron is constructed using electrophysiological and morphological data and a restricted set of channel specifications. The model cell exhibits a wide range of electrophysiological behaviors characteristic of rat subthalamic neurons. It reveals that a key set of three channels play a primary role in distinguishing behaviors: a high-voltage-activated calcium channel (Cav 1.2.-1.3), a low-voltage-activated calcium channel (Cav 3.-), and a small current calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa 2.1-2.3). See paper for more and details.
30
Regulation of firing frequency in a midbrain dopaminergic neuron model (Kuznetsova et al. 2010) 
 A dopaminergic (DA) neuron model with a morphologicaly realistic dendritic architecture. The model captures several salient features of DA neurons under different pharmacological manipulations and exhibits depolarization block for sufficiently high current pulses applied to the soma.
31
Retinal Ganglion Cell: I-CaN and I-CaL (Benison et al. 2001) 
 NEURON mod files for the CaN and CaL currents from the papers: Huang, S.-J. & Robinson, D.W. (1998). Activation and Inactivation properties of voltage-gated calcium currents in developing cat retinal ganglion cells. Neuroscience 85:239-247 (experimental) and Benison G. Keizer J., Chalupa L.M., Robinson D.W., (2001) J. theor. Biol. 210:187-199 (theoretical).
32
Rhesus Monkey Layer 3 Pyramidal Neurons: V1 vs PFC (Amatrudo, Weaver et al. 2012) 
 Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and high-resolution 3D morphometric analyses of layer 3 pyramidal neurons in in vitro slices of monkey primary visual cortex (V1) and dorsolateral granular prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) revealed that neurons in these two brain areas possess highly distinctive structural and functional properties. ... Three-dimensional reconstructions of V1 and dlPFC neurons were incorporated into computational models containing Hodgkin-Huxley and AMPA- and GABAA-receptor gated channels. Morphology alone largely accounted for observed passive physiological properties, but led to AP firing rates that differed more than observed empirically, and to synaptic responses that opposed empirical results. Accordingly, modeling predicts that active channel conductances differ between V1 and dlPFC neurons. The unique features of V1 and dlPFC neurons are likely fundamental determinants of area-specific network behavior. The compact electrotonic arbor and increased excitability of V1 neurons support the rapid signal integration required for early processing of visual information. The greater connectivity and dendritic complexity of dlPFC neurons likely support higher level cognitive functions including working memory and planning.
33
Sympathetic Preganglionic Neurone (Briant et al. 2014) 
 A model of a sympathetic preganglionic neurone of muscle vasoconstrictor-type.
34
Theta phase precession in a model CA3 place cell (Baker and Olds 2007) 
 "... The present study concerns a neurobiologically based computational model of the emergence of theta phase precession in which the responses of a single model CA3 pyramidal cell are examined in the context of stimulation by realistic afferent spike trains including those of place cells in entorhinal cortex, dentate gyrus, and other CA3 pyramidal cells. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the model CA3 pyramidal cell leads to a spatially correlated associational synaptic drive that subsequently creates a spatially asymmetric expansion of the model cell’s place field. ... Through selective manipulations of the model it is possible to decompose theta phase precession in CA3 into the separate contributing factors of inheritance from upstream afferents in the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex, the interaction of synaptically controlled increasing afferent drive with phasic inhibition, and the theta phase difference between dentate gyrus granule cell and CA3 pyramidal cell activity."
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