Circuits that contain the Cell : Neocortex spiny stellate cell

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    Models   Description
1. Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimers (Rowan et al. 2014)
"... As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. ... The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, ... Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. ... "
2. Emergence of physiological oscillation frequencies in neocortex simulations (Neymotin et al. 2011)
"Coordination of neocortical oscillations has been hypothesized to underlie the "binding" essential to cognitive function. However, the mechanisms that generate neocortical oscillations in physiological frequency bands remain unknown. We hypothesized that interlaminar relations in neocortex would provide multiple intermediate loops that would play particular roles in generating oscillations, adding different dynamics to the network. We simulated networks from sensory neocortex using 9 columns of event-driven rule-based neurons wired according to anatomical data and driven with random white-noise synaptic inputs. ..."
3. Grid cell oscillatory interference with noisy network oscillators (Zilli and Hasselmo 2010)
To examine whether an oscillatory interference model of grid cell activity could work if the oscillators were noisy neurons, we implemented these simulations. Here the oscillators are networks (either synaptically- or gap-junction--coupled) of one or more noisy neurons (either Izhikevich's simple model or a Hodgkin-Huxley--type biophysical model) which drive a postsynaptic cell (which may be integrate-and-fire, resonate-and-fire, or the simple model) which should fire spatially as a grid cell if the simulation is successful.
4. Large-scale model of neocortical slice in vitro exhibiting persistent gamma (Tomsett et al. 2014)
This model contains 15 neuron populations (8 excitatory, 7 inhibitory) arranged into 4 cortical layers (layer 1 empty, layers 2/3 combined). It produces a persistent gamma oscillation driven by layer 2/3. It runs using the VERTEX simulator, which is written in Matlab and is available from http://www.vertexsimulator.org
5. Nonlinear dendritic processing in barrel cortex spiny stellate neurons (Lavzin et al. 2012)
This is a multi-compartmental simulation of a spiny stellate neuron which is stimulated by a thalamocortical (TC) and cortico-cortical (CC) inputs. No other cells are explicitly modeled; the presynaptic network activation is represented by the number of active synapses. Preferred and non –preferred thalamic directions thus correspond to larder/smaller number of TC synapses. This simulation revealed that randomly activated synapses can cooperatively trigger global NMDA spikes, which involve participation of most of the dendritic tree. Surprisingly, we found that although the voltage profile of the cell was uniform, the calcium influx was restricted to ‘hot spots’ which correspond to synaptic clusters or large conductance synapses
6. Parametric computation and persistent gamma in a cortical model (Chambers et al. 2012)
Using the Traub et al (2005) model of the cortex we determined how 33 synaptic strength parameters control gamma oscillations. We used fractional factorial design to reduce the number of runs required to 4096. We found an expected multiplicative interaction between parameters.
7. Prosthetic electrostimulation for information flow repair in a neocortical simulation (Kerr 2012)
This model is an extension of a model (<a href="http://senselab.med.yale.edu/ModelDB/ShowModel.asp?model=138379">138379</a>) recently published in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience. This model consists of 4700 event-driven, rule-based neurons, wired according to anatomical data, and driven by both white-noise synaptic inputs and a sensory signal recorded from a rat thalamus. Its purpose is to explore the effects of cortical damage, along with the repair of this damage via a neuroprosthesis.
8. Synaptic information transfer in computer models of neocortical columns (Neymotin et al. 2010)
"... We sought to measure how the activity of the network alters information flow from inputs to output patterns. Information handling by the network reflected the degree of internal connectivity. ... With greater connectivity strength, the recurrent network translated activity and information due to contribution of activity from intrinsic network dynamics. ... At still higher internal synaptic strength, the network corrupted the external information, producing a state where little external information came through. The association of increased information retrieved from the network with increased gamma power supports the notion of gamma oscillations playing a role in information processing."
9. Synaptic scaling balances learning in a spiking model of neocortex (Rowan & Neymotin 2013)
Learning in the brain requires complementary mechanisms: potentiation and activity-dependent homeostatic scaling. We introduce synaptic scaling to a biologically-realistic spiking model of neocortex which can learn changes in oscillatory rhythms using STDP, and show that scaling is necessary to balance both positive and negative changes in input from potentiation and atrophy. We discuss some of the issues that arise when considering synaptic scaling in such a model, and show that scaling regulates activity whilst allowing learning to remain unaltered.
10. Theory of sequence memory in neocortex (Hawkins & Ahmad 2016)
"... First we show that a neuron with several thousand synapses segregated on active dendrites can recognize hundreds of independent patterns of cellular activity even in the presence of large amounts of noise and pattern variation. We then propose a neuron model where patterns detected on proximal dendrites lead to action potentials, defining the classic receptive field of the neuron, and patterns detected on basal and apical dendrites act as predictions by slightly depolarizing the neuron without generating an action potential. By this mechanism, a neuron can predict its activation in hundreds of independent contexts. We then present a network model based on neurons with these properties that learns time-based sequences. ..."

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