Circuits that contain the Cell : Hodgkin-Huxley neuron

(These model cells contain the same currents as were in the original 1952 HH model, however the physical dimensions of the neuron(s) might be different.)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. A 1000 cell network model for Lateral Amygdala (Kim et al. 2013)
1000 Cell Lateral Amygdala model for investigation of plasticity and memory storage during Pavlovian Conditioning.
2. A model of antennal lobe of bee (Chen JY et al. 2015)
" ... Here we use calcium imaging to reveal how responses across antennal lobe projection neurons change after association of an input odor with appetitive reinforcement. After appetitive conditioning to 1-hexanol, the representation of an odor mixture containing 1-hexanol becomes more similar to this odor and less similar to the background odor acetophenone. We then apply computational modeling to investigate how changes in synaptic connectivity can account for the observed plasticity. Our study suggests that experience-dependent modulation of inhibitory interactions in the antennal lobe aids perception of salient odor components mixed with behaviorally irrelevant background odors."
3. A Moth MGC Model-A HH network with quantitative rate reduction (Buckley & Nowotny 2011)
We provide the model used in Buckley & Nowotny (2011). It consists of a network of Hodgkin Huxley neurons coupled by slow GABA_B synapses which is run alongside a quantitative reduction described in the associated paper.
4. Competition model of pheromone ratio detection (Zavada et al. 2011)
For some closely related sympatric moth species, recognizing a specific pheromone component concentration ratio is essential for mating success. We propose and test a minimalist competition-based feed-forward neuronal model capable of detecting a certain ratio of pheromone components independently of overall concentration. This model represents an elementary recognition unit for binary mixtures which we propose is entirely contained in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of the male moth. A set of such units, along with projection neurons (PNs), can provide the input to higher brain centres. We found that (1) accuracy is mainly achieved by maintaining a certain ratio of connection strengths between olfactory receptor neurons (ORN) and local neurons (LN), much less by properties of the interconnections between the competing LNs proper. (2) successful ratio recognition is achieved using latency-to-first-spike in the LN populations which. (3) longer durations of the competition process between LNs did not result in higher recognition accuracy.
5. Contribution of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the neuronal network (Huang et al. 2009)
Epileptic seizures in diabetic hyperglycemia (DH) are not uncommon. This study aimed to determine the acute behavioral, pathological, and electrophysiological effects of status epilepticus (SE) on diabetic animals. ... We also used a simulation model to evaluate intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and neuroexcitability. ... In the simulation, increased intracellular ATP concentration promoted action potential firing. This finding that rats with DH had more brain damage after SE than rats without diabetes suggests the importance of intensively treating hyperglycemia and seizures in diabetic patients with epilepsy.
6. Convergence regulates synchronization-dependent AP transfer in feedforward NNs (Sailamul et al 2017)
We study how synchronization-dependent spike transfer can be affected by the structure of convergent feedforward wiring. We implemented computer simulations of model neural networks: a source and a target layer connected with different types of convergent wiring rules. In the Gaussian-Gaussian (GG) model, both the connection probability and the strength are given as Gaussian distribution as a function of spatial distance. In the Uniform-Constant (UC) and Uniform-Exponential (UE) models, the connection probability density is a uniform constant within a certain range, but the connection strength is set as a constant value or an exponentially decaying function, respectively. Then we examined how the spike transfer function is modulated under these conditions, while static or synchronized input patterns were introduced to simulate different levels of feedforward spike synchronization. We observed that the synchronization-dependent modulation of the transfer function appeared noticeably different for each convergence condition. The modulation of the spike transfer function was largest in the UC model, and smallest in the UE model. Our analysis showed that this difference was induced by the different spike weight distributions that was generated from convergent synapses in each model. Our results suggest that the structure of the feedforward convergence is a crucial factor for correlation-dependent spike control, thus must be considered important to understand the mechanism of information transfer in the brain.
7. Cortex-Basal Ganglia-Thalamus network model (Kumaravelu et al. 2016)
" ... We developed a biophysical network model comprising of the closed loop cortical-basal ganglia-thalamus circuit representing the healthy and parkinsonian rat brain. The network properties of the model were validated by comparing responses evoked in basal ganglia (BG) nuclei by cortical (CTX) stimulation to published experimental results. A key emergent property of the model was generation of low-frequency network oscillations. Consistent with their putative pathological role, low-frequency oscillations in model BG neurons were exaggerated in the parkinsonian state compared to the healthy condition. ..."
8. Deconstruction of cortical evoked potentials generated by subthalamic DBS (Kumaravelu et al 2018)
"... High frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) suppresses parkinsonian motor symptoms and modulates cortical activity. ... Cortical evoked potentials (cEP) generated by STN DBS reflect the response of cortex to subcortical stimulation, and the goal was to determine the neural origin of cEP using a two-step approach. First, we recorded cEP over ipsilateral primary motor cortex during different frequencies of STN DBS in awake healthy and unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned parkinsonian rats. Second, we used a biophysically-based model of the thalamocortical network to deconstruct the neural origin of the cEP. The in vivo cEP included short (R1), intermediate (R2) and long-latency (R3) responses. Model-based cortical responses to simulated STN DBS matched remarkably well the in vivo responses. R1 was generated by antidromic activation of layer 5 pyramidal neurons, while recurrent activation of layer 5 pyramidal neurons via excitatory axon collaterals reproduced R2. R3 was generated by polysynaptic activation of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons via the cortico-thalamic-cortical pathway. Antidromic activation of the hyperdirect pathway and subsequent intracortical and cortico-thalamo-cortical synaptic interactions were sufficient to generate cEP by STN DBS, and orthodromic activation through basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex pathways was not required. These results demonstrate the utility of cEP to determine the neural elements activated by STN DBS that might modulate cortical activity and contribute to the suppression of parkinsonian symptoms."
9. Epileptic seizure model with Morris-Lecar neurons (Beverlin and Netoff 2011)
Here we use phase-response curves (PRC) from Morris-Lecar (M-L) model neurons with synaptic depression and gradually decrease input current to cells within a network simulation. This method effectively decreases firing rates resulting in a shift to greater network synchrony illustrating a possible mechanism of the transition phenomenon. PRCs are measured from the M-L conductance based model cell with a range of input currents within the limit cycle. A large network of 3000 excitatory neurons is simulated with a network topology generated from second-order statistics which allows a range of population synchrony. The population synchrony of the oscillating cells is measured with the Kuramoto order parameter, which reveals a transition from tonic to clonic phase exhibited by our model network.
10. Gamma genesis in the basolateral amygdala (Feng et al 2019)
Using in vitro and in vivo data we develop the first large-scale biophysically and anatomically realistic model of the basolateral amygdala nucleus (BL), which reproduces the dynamics of the in vivo local field potential (LFP). Significantly, it predicts that BL intrinsically generates the transient gamma oscillations observed in vivo. The model permitted exploration of the poorly understood synaptic mechanisms underlying gamma genesis in BL, and the model's ability to compute LFPs at arbitrary numbers of recording sites provided insights into the characteristics of the spatial properties of gamma bursts. Furthermore, we show how gamma synchronizes principal cells to overcome their low firing rates while simultaneously promoting competition, potentially impacting their afferent selectivity and efferent drive, and thus emotional behavior.
11. Interaural time difference detection by slowly integrating neurons (Vasilkov Tikidji-Hamburyan 2012)
For localization of a sound source, animals and humans process the microsecond interaural time differences of arriving sound waves. How nervous systems, consisting of elements with time constants of about and more than 1 ms, can reach such high precision is still an open question. This model shows that population of 10000 slowly integrating Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with inhibitory and excitatory inputs (EI neurons) can detect minute temporal disparities in input signals which are significantly less than any time constant in the system.
12. Knox implementation of Destexhe 1998 spike and wave oscillation model (Knox et al 2018)
" ...The aim of this study was to use an established thalamocortical computer model to determine how T-type calcium channels work in concert with cortical excitability to contribute to pathogenesis and treatment response in CAE. METHODS: The model is comprised of cortical pyramidal, cortical inhibitory, thalamocortical relay, and thalamic reticular single-compartment neurons, implemented with Hodgkin-Huxley model ion channels and connected by AMPA, GABAA , and GABAB synapses. Network behavior was simulated for different combinations of T-type calcium channel conductance, inactivation time, steady state activation/inactivation shift, and cortical GABAA conductance. RESULTS: Decreasing cortical GABAA conductance and increasing T-type calcium channel conductance converted spindle to spike and wave oscillations; smaller changes were required if both were changed in concert. In contrast, left shift of steady state voltage activation/inactivation did not lead to spike and wave oscillations, whereas right shift reduced network propensity for oscillations of any type...."
13. Modeling epileptic seizure induced by depolarization block (Kim & Dykamp 2017)
"The inhibitory restraint necessary to suppress aberrant activity can fail when inhibitory neurons cease to generate action potentials as they enter depolarization block. We investigate possible bifurcation structures that arise at the onset of seizure-like activity resulting from depolarization block in inhibitory neurons. Networks of conductance based excitatory and inhibitory neurons are simulated to characterize different types of transitions to the seizure state, and a mean field model is developed to verify the generality of the observed phenomena of excitatory-inhibitory dynamics. ..."
14. Neural mass model based on single cell dynamics to model pathophysiology (Zandt et al 2014)
The model code as described in "A neural mass model based on single cell dynamics to model pathophysiology, Zandt et al. 2014, Journal of Computational Neuroscience" A Neural mass model (NMM) derived from single cell dynamics in a bottom up approach. Mean and standard deviation of the firing rates in the populations are calculated. The sigmoid is derived from the single cell FI-curve, allowing for easy implementation of pathological conditions. NMM is compared with a detailed spiking network model consisting of HH neurons. NMM code in Matlab. The network model is simulated using Norns (ModelDB # 154739)
15. NMDAR & GABAB/KIR Give Bistable Dendrites: Working Memory & Sequence Readout (Sanders et al., 2013)
" ...Here, we show that the voltage dependence of the inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) conductance activated by GABA(B) receptors adds substantial robustness to network simulations of bistability and the persistent firing that it underlies. The hyperpolarized state is robust because, at hyperpolarized potentials, the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is high and the NMDA conductance is low; the depolarized state is robust because, at depolarized potentials, the NMDA conductance is high and the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is low. Our results suggest that this complementary voltage dependence of GABA(B)/KIR and NMDA conductances makes them a "perfect couple" for producing voltage bistability."
16. Numerical Integration of Izhikevich and HH model neurons (Stewart and Bair 2009)
The Parker-Sochacki method is a new technique for the numerical integration of differential equations applicable to many neuronal models. Using this method, the solution order can be adapted according to the local conditions at each time step, enabling adaptive error control without changing the integration timestep. We apply the Parker-Sochacki method to the Izhikevich ‘simple’ model and a Hodgkin-Huxley type neuron, comparing the results with those obtained using the Runge-Kutta and Bulirsch-Stoer methods.
17. Pallidostriatal projections promote beta oscillations (Corbit, Whalen, et al 2016)
This model consists of an inhibitory loop combining the projections from GPe neurons back to the striatum (shown experimentally to predominantly affect fast spiking interneurons, FSIs), together with the coupling from FSIs to medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum, along with the projections from MSNs to GPe. All models are in the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism, adapted from previously published models for each cell type. The connected circuit produces irregular activity under control conditions, but increasing FSI-to-MSN connectivity as observed experimentally under dopamine depletion yields exaggerated beta oscillations and synchrony. Additional mechanistic aspects are also explored.
18. Parallelizing large networks in NEURON (Lytton et al. 2016)
"Large multiscale neuronal network simulations and innovative neurotechnologies are required for development of these models requires development of new simulation technologies. We describe here the current use of the NEURON simulator with MPI (message passing interface) for simulation in the domain of moderately large networks on commonly available High Performance Computers (HPCs). We discuss the basic layout of such simulations, including the methods of simulation setup, the run-time spike passing paradigm and post-simulation data storage and data management approaches. We also compare three types of networks, ..."
19. Simulated cortical color opponent receptive fields self-organize via STDP (Eguchi et al., 2014)
"... In this work, we address the problem of understanding the cortical processing of color information with a possible mechanism of the development of the patchy distribution of color selectivity via computational modeling. ... Our model of the early visual system consists of multiple topographically-arranged layers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, with sparse intra-layer connectivity and feed-forward connectivity between layers. Layers are arranged based on anatomy of early visual pathways, and include a retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and layered neocortex. ... After training with natural images, the neurons display heightened sensitivity to specific colors. ..."
20. Subiculum network model with dynamic chloride/potassium homeostasis (Buchin et al 2016)
This is the code implementing the single neuron and spiking neural network dynamics. The network has the dynamic ion concentrations of extracellular potassium and intracellular chloride. The code contains multiple parameter variations to study various mechanisms of the neural excitability in the context of chloride homeostasis.
21. Universal feature of developing networks (Tabak et al 2010)
"Spontaneous episodic activity is a fundamental mode of operation of developing networks. Surprisingly, the duration of an episode of activity correlates with the length of the silent interval that precedes it, but not with the interval that follows. ... We thus developed simple models incorporating excitatory coupling between heterogeneous neurons and activity-dependent synaptic depression. These models robustly generated episodic activity with the correct correlation pattern. The correlation pattern resulted from episodes being triggered at random levels of recovery from depression while they terminated around the same level of depression. To explain this fundamental difference between episode onset and termination, we used a mean field model, where only average activity and average level of recovery from synaptic depression are considered. ... This work further shows that networks with widely different architectures, different cell types, and different functions all operate according to the same general mechanism early in their development."

Re-display model names without descriptions