Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Spike Frequency Adaptation

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    Models   Description
1. Gating of steering signals through phasic modulation of reticulospinal neurons (Kozlov et al. 2014)
" ... We use the lamprey as a model for investigating the role of this phasic modulation of the reticulospinal activity, because the brainstem–spinal cord networks are known down to the cellular level in this phylogenetically oldest extant vertebrate. We describe how the phasic modulation of reticulospinal activity from the spinal CPG ensures reliable steering/turning commands without the need for a very precise timing of on- or offset, by using a biophysically detailed large-scale (19,600 model neurons and 646,800 synapses) computational model of the lamprey brainstem–spinal cord network. To verify that the simulated neural network can control body movements, including turning, the spinal activity is fed to a mechanical model of lamprey swimming. ..."
2. Grid cell oscillatory interference with noisy network oscillators (Zilli and Hasselmo 2010)
To examine whether an oscillatory interference model of grid cell activity could work if the oscillators were noisy neurons, we implemented these simulations. Here the oscillators are networks (either synaptically- or gap-junction--coupled) of one or more noisy neurons (either Izhikevich's simple model or a Hodgkin-Huxley--type biophysical model) which drive a postsynaptic cell (which may be integrate-and-fire, resonate-and-fire, or the simple model) which should fire spatially as a grid cell if the simulation is successful.
3. Models for cortical UP-DOWN states in a bistable inhibitory-stabilized network (Jercog et al 2017)
In the idling brain, neuronal circuits transition between periods of sustained firing (UP state) and quiescence (DOWN state), a pattern the mechanisms of which remain unclear. We analyzed spontaneous cortical population activity from anesthetized rats and found that UP and DOWN durations were highly variable and that population rates showed no significant decay during UP periods. We built a network rate model with excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) populations exhibiting a novel bistable regime between a quiescent and an inhibition-stabilized state of arbitrarily low rate, where fluctuations triggered state transitions. In addition, we implemented these mechanisms in a more biophysically realistic spiking network, where DOWN-to-UP transitions are caused by synchronous high-amplitude events impinging onto the network.
4. Network bursts in cultured NN result from different adaptive mechanisms (Masquelier & Deco 2013)
It is now well established that cultured neuron networks are spontaneously active, and tend to synchronize. Synchronous events typically involve the whole network, and have thus been termed “network spikes” (NS). Using experimental recordings and numerical simulations, we show here that the inter-NS interval statistics are complex, and allow inferring the neural mechanisms at work, in particular the adaptive ones, and estimating a number of parameters to which we cannot access experimentally.

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