Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Homeostasis

(Cellular mechanisms where the activity of a cell is maintained, e.g. the electrical activity of a cell is maintained by the insertion and removal or activation and inactivation (through phosphorylation or other means) of intrinsic currents and synaptic receptors.)
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    Models   Description
1. Computing with neural synchrony (Brette 2012)
"... In a heterogeneous neural population, it appears that synchrony patterns represent structure or sensory invariants in stimuli, which can then be detected by postsynaptic neurons. The required neural circuitry can spontaneously emerge with spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Using examples in different sensory modalities, I show that this allows simple neural circuits to extract relevant information from realistic sensory stimuli, for example to identify a fluctuating odor in the presence of distractors. ..."
2. Dentate gyrus network model pattern separation and granule cell scaling in epilepsy (Yim et al 2015)
The dentate gyrus (DG) is thought to enable efficient hippocampal memory acquisition via pattern separation. With patterns defined as spatiotemporally distributed action potential sequences, the principal DG output neurons (granule cells, GCs), presumably sparsen and separate similar input patterns from the perforant path (PP). In electrophysiological experiments, we have demonstrated that during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), GCs downscale their excitability by transcriptional upregulation of ‘leak’ channels. Here we studied whether this cell type-specific intrinsic plasticity is in a position to homeostatically adjust DG network function. We modified an established conductance-based computer model of the DG network such that it realizes a spatiotemporal pattern separation task, and quantified its performance with and without the experimentally constrained leaky GC phenotype. ...
3. Diffusive homeostasis in a spiking network model (Sweeney et al. 2015)
In this paper we propose a new mechanism, diffusive homeostasis, in which neural excitability is modulated by nitric oxide, a gas which can flow freely across cell membranes. Our model simulates the activity-dependent synthesis and diffusion of nitric oxide in a recurrent network model of integrate-and-fire neurons. The concentration of nitric oxide is then used as homeostatic readout which modulates the firing threshold of each neuron.
4. Electrostimulation to reduce synaptic scaling driven progression of Alzheimers (Rowan et al. 2014)
"... As cells die and synapses lose their drive, remaining cells suffer an initial decrease in activity. Neuronal homeostatic synaptic scaling then provides a feedback mechanism to restore activity. ... The scaling mechanism increases the firing rates of remaining cells in the network to compensate for decreases in network activity. However, this effect can itself become a pathology, ... Here, we present a mechanistic explanation of how directed brain stimulation might be expected to slow AD progression based on computational simulations in a 470-neuron biomimetic model of a neocortical column. ... "
5. Functional balanced networks with synaptic plasticity (Sadeh et al, 2015)
The model investigates the impact of learning on functional sensory networks. It uses large-scale recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons equipped with synaptic plasticity. It explains enhancement of orientation selectivity and emergence of feature-specific connectivity in visual cortex of rodents during development, as reported in experiments.
6. Lobster STG pyloric network model with calcium sensor (Gunay & Prinz 2010) (Prinz et al. 2004)
This pyloric network model simulator is a C/C++ program that saves 384 different calcium sensor values that are candidates for activity sensors (Gunay and Prinz, 2010). The simulator was used to scan all of the 20 million pyloric network models that were previously collected in a database (Prinz et al, 2004).
7. Mechanisms for stable, robust, and adaptive development of orientation maps (Stevens et al. 2013)
GCAL (Gain Control, Adaptation, Laterally connected). Simple but robust single-population V1 orientation map model.
8. Modeling hebbian and homeostatic plasticity (Toyoizumi et al. 2014)
"... We propose a model in which synaptic strength is the product of a synapse-specific Hebbian factor and a postsynaptic- cell-specific homeostatic factor, with each factor separately arriving at a stable inactive state. This model captures ODP dynamics and has plausible biophysical substrates. We confirm model predictions experimentally that plasticity is inactive at stable states and that synaptic strength overshoots during recovery from visual deprivation. ..."
9. Subiculum network model with dynamic chloride/potassium homeostasis (Buchin et al 2016)
This is the code implementing the single neuron and spiking neural network dynamics. The network has the dynamic ion concentrations of extracellular potassium and intracellular chloride. The code contains multiple parameter variations to study various mechanisms of the neural excitability in the context of chloride homeostasis.
10. Synaptic scaling balances learning in a spiking model of neocortex (Rowan & Neymotin 2013)
Learning in the brain requires complementary mechanisms: potentiation and activity-dependent homeostatic scaling. We introduce synaptic scaling to a biologically-realistic spiking model of neocortex which can learn changes in oscillatory rhythms using STDP, and show that scaling is necessary to balance both positive and negative changes in input from potentiation and atrophy. We discuss some of the issues that arise when considering synaptic scaling in such a model, and show that scaling regulates activity whilst allowing learning to remain unaltered.

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