Circuits that contain the Cell : Abstract Wang-Buzsaki neuron

(Originally a single compartment model with HH channels designed for networks of fast spiking neocortical neurons as described in Wang XJ, Buzsaki G (1996) Gamma oscillation by synaptic inhibition in a hippocampal interneuronal network model. J Neurosci 16:6402-13. In subsequent models from other authors the channels or synapses were reused, sometimes in multicompartmental models.)
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    Models   Description
1. Conductance-based model of Layer-4 in the barrel cortex (Argaman et Golomb 2017)
Layer 4 in the mouse barrel cortex includes hundreds of inhibitory PV neurons and thousands of excitatory neurons. Despite this fact, its dynamical state is similar to a balanced state of large neuronal circuits.
2. CRH modulates excitatory transmission and network physiology in hippocampus (Gunn et al. 2017)
This model simulates the effects of CRH on sharp waves in a rat CA1/CA3 model. It uses the frequency of the sharp waves as an output of the network.
3. Fronto-parietal visuospatial WM model with HH cells (Edin et al 2007)
1) J Cogn Neurosci: 3 structural mechanisms that had been hypothesized to underlie vsWM development during childhood were evaluated by simulating the model and comparing results to fMRI. It was concluded that inter-regional synaptic connection strength cause vsWM development. 2) J Integr Neurosci: Given the importance of fronto-parietal connections, we tested whether connection asymmetry affected resistance to distraction. We drew the conclusion that stronger frontal connections are beneficial. By comparing model results to EEG, we concluded that the brain indeed has stronger frontal-to-parietal connections than vice versa.
4. Gamma oscillations in hippocampal interneuron networks (Bartos et al 2002)
To examine whether an interneuron network with fast inhibitory synapses can act as a gamma frequency oscillator, we developed an interneuron network model based on experimentally determined properties. In comparison to previous interneuron network models, our model was able to generate oscillatory activity with higher coherence over a broad range of frequencies (20-110 Hz). In this model, high coherence and flexibility in frequency control emerge from the combination of synaptic properties, network structure, and electrical coupling.
5. Gamma oscillations in hippocampal interneuron networks (Wang, Buzsaki 1996)
The authors investigated the hypothesis that 20-80Hz neuronal (gamma) oscillations can emerge in sparsely connected network models of GABAergic fast-spiking interneurons. They explore model NN synchronization and compare their results to anatomical and electrophysiological data from hippocampal fast spiking interneurons.
6. Hippocampal basket cell gap junction network dynamics (Saraga et al. 2006)
2 cell network of hippocampal basket cells connected by gap junctions. Paper explores how distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.
7. L4 cortical barrel NN model receiving thalamic input during whisking or touch (Gutnisky et al. 2017)
Excitatory neurons in layer 4 (L4) in the barrel cortex respond relatively strongly to touch but not to whisker movement (Yu et al., Nat. Neurosci. 2016). The model explains the mechanism underlying this effect. The network is settled to filter out most stationary inputs. Brief touch input passes through because it takes time until feed-forward inhibition silences excitatory neurons receiving brief and strong thalamic excitation.
8. Modeling the effects of dopamine on network synchronization (Komek et al. 2012)
Dopamine modulates cortical circuit activity in part through its actions on GABAergic interneurons, including increasing the excitability of fast-spiking interneurons. Though such effects have been demonstrated in single cells, there are no studies that examine how such mechanisms may lead to the effects of dopamine at a neural network level. In this study, we investigated the effects of dopamine on synchronization in two simulated neural networks; one biophysical model composed of Wang-Buzsaki neurons and a reduced model with theta neurons. In both models, we show that parametrically varying the levels of dopamine, modeled through the changes in the excitability of interneurons, reveals an inverted-U shaped relationship, with low gamma band power at both low and high dopamine levels and optimal synchronization at intermediate levels. Moreover, such a relationship holds when the external input is both tonic and periodic at gamma band range. Together, our results indicate that dopamine can modulate cortical gamma band synchrony in an inverted-U fashion and that the physiologic effects of dopamine on single fast-spiking interneurons can give rise to such non-monotonic effects at the network level.
9. Persistent synchronized bursting activity in cortical tissues (Golomb et al 2005)
The program simulates a one-dimensional model of a cortical tissue with excitatory and inhibitory populations.
10. Response properties of neocort. neurons to temporally modulated noisy inputs (Koendgen et al. 2008)
Neocortical neurons are classified by current–frequency relationship. This is a static description and it may be inadequate to interpret neuronal responses to time-varying stimuli. Theoretical studies (Brunel et al., 2001; Fourcaud-Trocmé et al. 2003; Fourcaud-Trocmé and Brunel 2005; Naundorf et al. 2005) suggested that single-cell dynamical response properties are necessary to interpret ensemble responses to fast input transients. Further, it was shown that input-noise linearizes and boosts the response bandwidth, and that the interplay between the barrage of noisy synaptic currents and the spike-initiation mechanisms determine the dynamical properties of the firing rate. In order to allow a reader to explore such simulations, we prepared a simple NEURON implementation of the experiments performed in Köndgen et al., 2008 (see also Fourcaud-Trocmé al. 2003; Fourcaud-Trocmé and Brunel 2005). In addition, we provide sample MATLAB routines for exploring the sandwich model proposed in Köndgen et al., 2008, employing a simple frequdency-domain filtering. The simulations and the MATLAB routines are based on the linear response properties of layer 5 pyramidal cells estimated by injecting a superposition of a small-amplitude sinusoidal wave and a background noise, as in Köndgen et al., 2008.
11. Structure-dynamics relationships in bursting neuronal networks revealed (Mäki-Marttunen et al. 2013)
This entry includes tools for generating and analyzing network structure, and for running the neuronal network simulations on them.

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