Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Hebbian plasticity

(Changes in synaptic strengths due to synchronized activity in pre and post-synaptic cells.)
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    Models   Description
1. Acetylcholine-modulated plasticity in reward-driven navigation (Zannone et al 2018)
"Neuromodulation plays a fundamental role in the acquisition of new behaviours. In previous experimental work, we showed that acetylcholine biases hippocampal synaptic plasticity towards depression, and the subsequent application of dopamine can retroactively convert depression into potentiation. We also demonstrated that incorporating this sequentially neuromodulated Spike- Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP) rule in a network model of navigation yields effective learning of changing reward locations. Here, we employ computational modelling to further characterize the effects of cholinergic depression on behaviour. We find that acetylcholine, by allowing learning from negative outcomes, enhances exploration over the action space. We show that this results in a variety of effects, depending on the structure of the model, the environment and the task. Interestingly, sequentially neuromodulated STDP also yields flexible learning, surpassing the performance of other reward-modulated plasticity rules."
2. Alternative time representation in dopamine models (Rivest et al. 2009)
Combines a long short-term memory (LSTM) model of the cortex to a temporal difference learning (TD) model of the basal ganglia. Code to run simulations similar to the published data: Rivest, F, Kalaska, J.F., Bengio, Y. (2009) Alternative time representation in dopamine models. Journal of Computational Neuroscience. See http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10827-009-0191-1 for details.
3. Cerebellar memory consolidation model (Yamazaki et al. 2015)
"Long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses is thought to underlie memory formation in cerebellar motor learning. Recent experimental results, however, suggest that multiple plasticity mechanisms in the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar/vestibular nuclei participate in memory formation. To examine this possibility, we formulated a simple model of the cerebellum with a minimal number of components based on its known anatomy and physiology, implementing both LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP) at PF-PC synapses and mossy fiber-vestibular nuclear neuron (MF-VN) synapses. With this model, we conducted a simulation study of the gain adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR) eye movement. Our model reproduced several important aspects of previously reported experimental results in wild-type and cerebellum-related gene-manipulated mice. ..."
4. Cortex learning models (Weber at al. 2006, Weber and Triesch, 2006, Weber and Wermter 2006/7)
A simulator and the configuration files for three publications are provided. First, "A hybrid generative and predictive model of the motor cortex" (Weber at al. 2006) which uses reinforcement learning to set up a toy action scheme, then uses unsupervised learning to "copy" the learnt action, and an attractor network to predict the hidden code of the unsupervised network. Second, "A Self-Organizing Map of Sigma-Pi Units" (Weber and Wermter 2006/7) learns frame of reference transformations on population codes in an unsupervised manner. Third, "A possible representation of reward in the learning of saccades" (Weber and Triesch, 2006) implements saccade learning with two possible learning schemes for horizontal and vertical saccades, respectively.
5. Dynamic dopamine modulation in the basal ganglia: Learning in Parkinson (Frank et al 2004,2005)
See README file for all info on how to run models under different tasks and simulated Parkinson's and medication conditions.
6. Hebbian STDP for modelling the emergence of disparity selectivity (Chauhan et al 2018)
This code shows how Hebbian learning mediated by STDP mechanisms could explain the emergence of disparity selectivity in the early visual system. This upload is a snapshot of the code at the time of acceptance of the paper. For a link to a soon-to-come git repository, consult the author's website: www.tusharchauhan.com/research/ . The datasets used in the paper are not provided due to size, but download links and expected directory-structures are. The user can (and is strongly encouraged to) experiment with their own dataset. Let me know if you find something interesting! Finally, I am very keen on a redesign/restructure/adaptation of the code to more applied problems in AI and robotics (or any other field where a spiking non-linear approach makes sense). If you have a serious proposal, don't hesitate to contact me [research AT tusharchauhan DOT com ].
7. Modeling hebbian and homeostatic plasticity (Toyoizumi et al. 2014)
"... We propose a model in which synaptic strength is the product of a synapse-specific Hebbian factor and a postsynaptic- cell-specific homeostatic factor, with each factor separately arriving at a stable inactive state. This model captures ODP dynamics and has plausible biophysical substrates. We confirm model predictions experimentally that plasticity is inactive at stable states and that synaptic strength overshoots during recovery from visual deprivation. ..."
8. Simulated cortical color opponent receptive fields self-organize via STDP (Eguchi et al., 2014)
"... In this work, we address the problem of understanding the cortical processing of color information with a possible mechanism of the development of the patchy distribution of color selectivity via computational modeling. ... Our model of the early visual system consists of multiple topographically-arranged layers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, with sparse intra-layer connectivity and feed-forward connectivity between layers. Layers are arranged based on anatomy of early visual pathways, and include a retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and layered neocortex. ... After training with natural images, the neurons display heightened sensitivity to specific colors. ..."
9. Towards a biologically plausible model of LGN-V1 pathways (Lian et al 2019)
"Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that the visual system employs a sparse code to represent visual stimuli, where information is encoded in an efficient way by a small population of cells that respond to sensory input at a given time. This includes simple cells in primary visual cortex (V1), which are defined by their linear spatial integration of visual stimuli. Various models of sparse coding have been proposed to explain physiological phenomena observed in simple cells. However, these models have usually made the simplifying assumption that inputs to simple cells already incorporate linear spatial summation. This overlooks the fact that these inputs are known to have strong non-linearities such as the separation of ON and OFF pathways, or separation of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Consequently these models ignore a range of important experimental phenomena that are related to the emergence of linear spatial summation from non-linear inputs, such as segregation of ON and OFF sub-regions of simple cell receptive fields, the push-pull effect of excitation and inhibition, and phase-reversed cortico-thalamic feedback. Here, we demonstrate that a two-layer model of the visual pathway from the lateral geniculate nucleus to V1 that incorporates these biological constraints on the neural circuits and is based on sparse coding can account for the emergence of these experimental phenomena, diverse shapes of receptive fields and contrast invariance of orientation tuning of simple cells when the model is trained on natural images. The model suggests that sparse coding can be implemented by the V1 simple cells using neural circuits with a simple biologically plausible architecture."

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