Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Depression

(Reduction in the amplitude of Excitatory PostSynaptic Potentials following a stimulus train. The amplitude reduction and it's recovery depend on the stimulus and have time constants of a few seconds to a few minutes. Thought to be a presynaptic effect involving the number of quanta.)
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    Models   Description
1. Burst induced synaptic plasticity in Apysia sensorimotor neurons (Phares et al 2003)
The Aplysia sensorimotor synapse is a key site of plasticity for several simple forms of learning. Intracellular stimulation of sensory neurons to fire a burst of action potentials at 10 Hz for 1 sec led to significant homosynaptic depression of postsynaptic responses. During the burst, the steady-state depressed phase of the postsynaptic response, which was only 20% of the initial EPSP of the burst, still contributed to firing the motor neuron. To explore the functional contribution of transient homosynaptic depression to the response of the motor neuron, computer simulations of the sensorimotor synapse with and without depression were compared. Depression allowed the motor neuron to produce graded responses over a wide range of presynaptic input strength. Thus, synaptic depression increased the dynamic range of the sensorimotor synapse and can, in principle, have a profound effect on information processing. Please see paper for results and details.
2. Homosynaptic plasticity in the tail withdrawal circuit (TWC) of Aplysia (Baxter and Byrne 2006)
The tail-withdrawal circuit of Aplysia provides a useful model system for investigating synaptic dynamics. Sensory neurons within the circuit manifest several forms of synaptic plasticity. Here, we developed a model of the circuit and investigated the ways in which depression (DEP) and potentiation (POT) contributed to information processing. DEP limited the amount of motor neuron activity that could be elicited by the monosynaptic pathway alone. POT within the monosynaptic pathway did not compensate for DEP. There was, however, a synergistic interaction between POT and the polysynaptic pathway. This synergism extended the dynamic range of the network, and the interplay between DEP and POT made the circuit respond preferentially to long-duration, low-frequency inputs.
3. Minimal model of interictal and ictal discharges “Epileptor-2” (Chizhov et al 2018)
"Seizures occur in a recurrent manner with intermittent states of interictal and ictal discharges (IIDs and IDs). The transitions to and from IDs are determined by a set of processes, including synaptic interaction and ionic dynamics. Although mathematical models of separate types of epileptic discharges have been developed, modeling the transitions between states remains a challenge. A simple generic mathematical model of seizure dynamics (Epileptor) has recently been proposed by Jirsa et al. (2014); however, it is formulated in terms of abstract variables. In this paper, a minimal population-type model of IIDs and IDs is proposed that is as simple to use as the Epileptor, but the suggested model attributes physical meaning to the variables. The model is expressed in ordinary differential equations for extracellular potassium and intracellular sodium concentrations, membrane potential, and short-term synaptic depression variables. A quadratic integrate-and-fire model driven by the population input current is used to reproduce spike trains in a representative neuron. ..."
4. Multistability of clustered states in a globally inhibitory network (Chandrasekaran et al. 2009)
"We study a network of m identical excitatory cells projecting excitatory synaptic connections onto a single inhibitory interneuron, which is reciprocally coupled to all excitatory cells through inhibitory synapses possessing short-term synaptic depression. We find that such a network with global inhibition possesses multiple stable activity patterns with distinct periods, characterized by the clustering of the excitatory cells into synchronized sub-populations. We prove the existence and stability of n-cluster solutions in a m-cell network. ... Implications for temporal coding and memory storage are discussed."
5. Network bursts in cultured NN result from different adaptive mechanisms (Masquelier & Deco 2013)
It is now well established that cultured neuron networks are spontaneously active, and tend to synchronize. Synchronous events typically involve the whole network, and have thus been termed “network spikes” (NS). Using experimental recordings and numerical simulations, we show here that the inter-NS interval statistics are complex, and allow inferring the neural mechanisms at work, in particular the adaptive ones, and estimating a number of parameters to which we cannot access experimentally.
6. Sleep-wake transitions in corticothalamic system (Bazhenov et al 2002)
The authors investigate the transition between sleep and awake states with intracellular recordings in cats and computational models. The model describes many essential features of slow wave sleep and activated states as well as the transition between them.
7. Synaptic plasticity can produce and enhance direction selectivity (Carver et al, 2008)
" ... We propose a parsimonious model of motion processing that generates direction selective responses using short-term synaptic depression and can reproduce salient features of direction selectivity found in a population of neurons in the midbrain of the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia virescens. The model achieves direction selectivity with an elementary Reichardt motion detector: information from spatially separated receptive fields converges onto a neuron via dynamically different pathways. In the model, these differences arise from convergence of information through distinct synapses that either exhibit or do not exhibit short-term synaptic depression—short-term depression produces phase-advances relative to nondepressing synapses. ..."

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