Circuits that contain the Receptor : Dopaminergic Receptor

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    Models   Description
1. A 1000 cell network model for Lateral Amygdala (Kim et al. 2013)
1000 Cell Lateral Amygdala model for investigation of plasticity and memory storage during Pavlovian Conditioning.
2. A basal ganglia model of aberrant learning (Ursino et al. 2018)
A comprehensive, biologically inspired neurocomputational model of action selection in the Basal Ganglia allows simulation of dopamine induced aberrant learning in Parkinsonian subjects. In particular, the model simulates the Alternate Finger Tapping motor task as an indicator of bradykinesia.
3. A contracting model of the basal ganglia (Girard et al. 2008)
Basal ganglia model : selection processes between channels, dynamics controlled by contraction analysis, rate-coding model of neurons based on locally projected dynamical systems (lPDS).
4. A neural model of Parkinson`s disease (Cutsuridis and Perantonis 2006, Cutsuridis 2006, 2007)
"A neural model of neuromodulatory (dopamine) control of arm movements in Parkinson’s disease (PD) bradykinesia was recently introduced [1, 2]. The model is multi-modular consisting of a basal ganglia module capable of selecting the most appropriate motor command in a given context, a cortical module for coordinating and executing the final motor commands, and a spino-musculo-skeletal module for guiding the arm to its final target and providing proprioceptive (feedback) input of the current state of the muscle and arm to higher cortical and lower spinal centers. ... The new (extended) model [3] predicted that the reduced reciprocal disynaptic Ia inhibition in the DA depleted case doesn’t lead to the co-contraction of antagonist motor units." See below readme and papers for more and details.
5. Dynamic dopamine modulation in the basal ganglia: Learning in Parkinson (Frank et al 2004,2005)
See README file for all info on how to run models under different tasks and simulated Parkinson's and medication conditions.
6. Gamma genesis in the basolateral amygdala (Feng et al 2019)
Using in vitro and in vivo data we develop the first large-scale biophysically and anatomically realistic model of the basolateral amygdala nucleus (BL), which reproduces the dynamics of the in vivo local field potential (LFP). Significantly, it predicts that BL intrinsically generates the transient gamma oscillations observed in vivo. The model permitted exploration of the poorly understood synaptic mechanisms underlying gamma genesis in BL, and the model's ability to compute LFPs at arbitrary numbers of recording sites provided insights into the characteristics of the spatial properties of gamma bursts. Furthermore, we show how gamma synchronizes principal cells to overcome their low firing rates while simultaneously promoting competition, potentially impacting their afferent selectivity and efferent drive, and thus emotional behavior.
7. Spiking neuron model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al 2006)
A spiking neuron model of the basal ganglia (BG) circuit (striatum, STN, GP, SNr). Includes: parallel anatomical channels; tonic dopamine; dopamine receptors in striatum, STN, and GP; burst-firing in STN; GABAa, AMPA, and NMDA currents; effects of synaptic location. Model demonstrates selection and switching of input signals. Replicates experimental data on changes in slow-wave (<1 Hz) and gamma-band oscillations within BG nuclei following lesions and pharmacological manipulations.
8. Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
9. Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.
10. Striatal NN model of MSNs and FSIs investigated effects of dopamine depletion (Damodaran et al 2015)
This study investigates the mechanisms that are affected in the striatal network after dopamine depletion and identifies potential therapeutic targets to restore normal activity.

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