Circuits that contain the Model Type : Neuron or other electrically excitable cell

(An electrically excitable cell such as a Neuron, Heart, Muscle, Sensory, or Endocrine cell.)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. 5-neuron-model of neocortex for producing realistic extracellular AP shapes (Van Dijck et al. 2012)
This is a 5-neuron model of neocortex, containing one tufted layer-5 pyramidal cell, two non-tufted pyramidal cells, and two inhibitory interneurons. It was used to reproduce extracellular spike shapes in a study comparing algorithms for spike sorting and electrode selection. The neuron models are adapted from Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen et al. (2005).
2. A 1000 cell network model for Lateral Amygdala (Kim et al. 2013)
1000 Cell Lateral Amygdala model for investigation of plasticity and memory storage during Pavlovian Conditioning.
3. A cerebellar model of phase-locked tACS for essential tremor (Schreglmann et al., 2021)
This model is a supplementary material for Schreglmann, Sebastian R., et al. "Non-invasive suppression of essential tremor via phase-locked disruption of its temporal coherence" Nature Communications (2021). The model demonstrates that phase-locked transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is able to disrupt the tremor-related oscillations in the cerebellum, and its efficacy is highly dependent on the relative phase between the stimulation and tremor.
4. A dendritic disinhibitory circuit mechanism for pathway-specific gating (Yang et al. 2016)
"While reading a book in a noisy café, how does your brain ‘gate in’ visual information while filtering out auditory stimuli? Here we propose a mechanism for such flexible routing of information flow in a complex brain network (pathway-specific gating), tested using a network model of pyramidal neurons and three classes of interneurons with connection probabilities constrained by data. We find that if inputs from different pathways cluster on a pyramidal neuron dendrite, a pathway can be gated-on by a disinhibitory circuit motif. ..."
5. A gap junction network of Amacrine Cells controls Nitric Oxide release (Jacoby et al 2018)
"... The effects of the neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) have been studied in many circuits, including in the vertebrate retina, where it regulates synaptic release, gap junction coupling, and blood vessel dilation, but little is known about the cells that release NO. We show that a single type of amacrine cell (AC) controls NO release in the inner retina, and we report its light responses, electrical properties, and calcium dynamics. We discover that this AC forms a dense gap junction network and that the strength of electrical coupling in the network is regulated by light through NO. A model of the network offers insights into the biophysical specializations leading to auto-regulation of NO release within the network."
6. A model of the femur-tibia control system in stick insects (Stein et al. 2008)
We studied the femur-tibia joint control system of the insect leg, and its switch between resistance reflex in posture control and "active reaction" in walking. The "active reaction" is basically a reversal of the resistance reflex. Both responses are elicited by the same sensory input and the same neuronal network (the femur-tibia network). The femur-tibia network was modeled by fitting the responses of model neurons to those obtained in animals. Each implemented neuron has a physiological counterpart. The strengths of 16 interneuronal pathways that integrate sensory input were then assigned three different values and varied independently, generating a database of more than 43 million network variants. The uploaded version contains the model that best represented the resistance reflex. Please see the README for more help. We demonstrate that the combinatorial code of interneuronal pathways determines motor output. A switch between different behaviors such as standing to walking can thus be achieved by altering the strengths of selected sensory integration pathways.
7. A spiking model of cortical broadcast and competition (Shanahan 2008)
"This paper presents a computer model of cortical broadcast and competition based on spiking neurons and inspired by the hypothesis of a global neuronal workspace underlying conscious information processing in the human brain. In the model, the hypothesised workspace is realised by a collection of recurrently interconnected regions capable of sustaining and disseminating a reverberating spatial pattern of activation. ..."
8. Activity constraints on stable neuronal or network parameters (Olypher and Calabrese 2007)
"In this study, we developed a general description of parameter combinations for which specified characteristics of neuronal or network activity are constant. Our approach is based on the implicit function theorem and is applicable to activity characteristics that smoothly depend on parameters. Such smoothness is often intrinsic to neuronal systems when they are in stable functional states. The conclusions about how parameters compensate each other, developed in this study, can thus be used even without regard to the specific mathematical model describing a particular neuron or neuronal network. ..."
9. Axonal gap junctions produce fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells (Traub et al. 2008)
Examines how electrical coupling between proximal axons produces fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Traub RD, Middleton SJ, Knopfel T, Whittington MA (2008) Model of very fast (>75 Hz) network oscillations generated by electrical coupling between the proximal axons of cerebellar Purkinje cells. European Journal of Neuroscience.
10. Basal ganglia-thalamic network model for deep brain stimulation (So et al. 2012)
This is a model of the basal ganglia-thalamic network, modified from the Rubin and Terman model (High frequency stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus, Rubin and Terman 2004). We subsequently used this model to investigate the effectiveness of STN and GPi DBS as well as lesion when various proportions of local cells and fibers of passage were activated or silenced. The BG network exhibited characteristics consistent with published experimental data, both on the level of single cells and on the network level. Perhaps most notably, and in contrast to the original RT model, the changes in the thalamic error index with changes in the DBS frequency matched well the changes in clinical symptoms with changes in DBS frequency.
11. Bursting and oscillations in RD1 Retina driven by AII Amacrine Neuron (Choi et al. 2014)
"In many forms of retinal degeneration, photoreceptors die but inner retinal circuits remain intact. In the rd1 mouse, an established model for blinding retinal diseases, spontaneous activity in the coupled network of AII amacrine and ON cone bipolar cells leads to rhythmic bursting of ganglion cells. Since such activity could impair retinal and/or cortical responses to restored photoreceptor function, understanding its nature is important for developing treatments of retinal pathologies. Here we analyzed a compartmental model of the wild-type mouse AII amacrine cell to predict that the cell's intrinsic membrane properties, specifically, interacting fast Na and slow, M-type K conductances, would allow its membrane potential to oscillate when light-evoked excitatory synaptic inputs were withdrawn following photoreceptor degeneration. ..."
12. Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
13. CA1 pyr cell: Inhibitory modulation of spatial selectivity+phase precession (Grienberger et al 2017)
Spatially uniform synaptic inhibition enhances spatial selectivity and temporal coding in CA1 place cells by suppressing broad out-of-field excitation.
14. Ca2+-activated I_CAN and synaptic depression promotes network-dependent oscil. (Rubin et al. 2009)
"... the preBotzinger complex... we present and analyze a mathematical model demonstrating an unconventional mechanism of rhythm generation in which glutamatergic synapses and the short-term depression of excitatory transmission play key rhythmogenic roles. Recurrent synaptic excitation triggers postsynaptic Ca2+- activated nonspecific cation current (ICAN) to initiate a network-wide burst. Robust depolarization due to ICAN also causes voltage-dependent spike inactivation, which diminishes recurrent excitation and thus attenuates postsynaptic Ca2+ accumulation. ..."
15. Cancelling redundant input in ELL pyramidal cells (Bol et al. 2011)
The paper investigates the property of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of the brain of weakly electric fish to cancel predictable stimuli. Electroreceptors on the skin encode all signals in their firing activity, but superficial pyramidal (SP) cells in the ELL that receive this feedforward input do not respond to constant sinusoidal signals. This cancellation putatively occurs using a network of feedback delay lines and burst-induced synaptic plasticity between the delay lines and the SP cell that learns to cancel the redundant input. Biologically, the delay lines are parallel fibres from cerebellar-like granule cells in the eminentia granularis posterior. A model of this network (e.g. electroreceptors, SP cells, delay lines and burst-induced plasticity) was constructed to test whether the current knowledge of how the network operates is sufficient to cancel redundant stimuli.
16. Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
17. Complex dynamics: reproducing Golgi cell electroresponsiveness (Geminiani et al 2018, 2019ab)
Excerpts from three papers abstracts: "Brain neurons exhibit complex electroresponsive properties – including intrinsic subthreshold oscillations and pacemaking, resonance and phase-reset – which are thought to play a critical role in controlling neural network dynamics. Although these properties emerge from detailed representations of molecular-level mechanisms in “realistic” models, they cannot usually be generated by simplified neuronal models (although these may show spike-frequency adaptation and bursting). We report here that this whole set of properties can be generated by the extended generalized leaky integrate-and-fire (E-GLIF) neuron model. ..." "... In order to reproduce these properties in single-point neuron models, we have optimized the Extended-Generalized Leaky Integrate and Fire (E-GLIF) neuron through a multi-objective gradient-based algorithm targeting the desired input–output relationships. ..." " ... In order to investigate how single neuron dynamics and geometrical modular connectivity affect cerebellar processing, we have built an olivocerebellar Spiking Neural Network (SNN) based on a novel simplification algorithm for single point models (Extended Generalized Leaky Integrate and Fire, EGLIF) capturing essential non-linear neuronal dynamics (e.g., pacemaking, bursting, adaptation, oscillation and resonance). ..."
18. Cortical Interneuron & Pyramidal Cell Model of Cortical Spreading Depression (Stein & Harris 2022)
This 2-cell cortical circuit model consists of a negative feedback loop between a single compartment pyramidal cell and a single compartment interneuron. Ion concentrations in the extra- and intracellular spaces are included in the model. The model is used to test the contribution of cortical inhibitory interneurons to the initiation of cortical spreading depression, as characterized by spike block in the pyramidal cell. Results show that interneuronal inhibition provides a wider dynamic range to the circuit and generally improves stability against spike block. Despite these beneficial effects, strong interneuronal firing contributed to rapidly changing extracellular ion concentrations, which facilitated hyperexcitation and led to spike block first in the interneuron and then in the pyramidal cell. The model results demonstrate that while the role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is complex, they are critical to the initiation of pyramidal cell spike block and CSD. See reference below for more details.
19. Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
20. Dentate gyrus network model pattern separation and granule cell scaling in epilepsy (Yim et al 2015)
The dentate gyrus (DG) is thought to enable efficient hippocampal memory acquisition via pattern separation. With patterns defined as spatiotemporally distributed action potential sequences, the principal DG output neurons (granule cells, GCs), presumably sparsen and separate similar input patterns from the perforant path (PP). In electrophysiological experiments, we have demonstrated that during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), GCs downscale their excitability by transcriptional upregulation of ‘leak’ channels. Here we studied whether this cell type-specific intrinsic plasticity is in a position to homeostatically adjust DG network function. We modified an established conductance-based computer model of the DG network such that it realizes a spatiotemporal pattern separation task, and quantified its performance with and without the experimentally constrained leaky GC phenotype. ...
21. Development and Binocular Matching of Orientation Selectivity in Visual Cortex (Xu et al 2020)
This model investigates the development of orientation selectivity and its binocular matching in visual cortex by implementing a neuron that has plastic synapses for its inputs from the left and right eye. The plasticity is taken to be voltage-based with homeostasis (Clopath et al 2010). The neuron is modeled as an adaptive exponential integrate-fire neuron. The uploaded model has been used in Xu, Cang & Riecke (2020) to analyze the impact of ocular dominance and orientation selectivity on the matching process. There it has been found that the matching can proceed by a slow shifting or a sudden switching of the preferred orientation.
22. Development of orientation-selective simple cell receptive fields (Rishikesh and Venkatesh, 2003)
Implementation of a computational model for the development of simple-cell receptive fields spanning the regimes before and after eye-opening. The before eye-opening period is governed by a correlation-based rule from Miller (Miller, J. Neurosci., 1994), and the post eye-opening period is governed by a self-organizing, experience-dependent dynamics derived in the reference below.
23. Disrupted information processing in Fmr1-KO mouse layer 4 barrel cortex (Domanski et al 2019)
"Sensory hypersensitivity is a common and debilitating feature of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). How developmental changes in neuronal function culminate in network dysfunction that underlies sensory hypersensitivities is unknown. By systematically studying cellular and synaptic properties of layer 4 neurons combined with cellular and network simulations, we explored how the array of phenotypes in Fmr1-knockout (KO) mice produce circuit pathology during development. We show that many of the cellular and synaptic pathologies in Fmr1-KO mice are antagonistic, mitigating circuit dysfunction, and hence may be compensatory to the primary pathology. Overall, the layer 4 network in the Fmr1-KO exhibits significant alterations in spike output in response to thalamocortical input and distorted sensory encoding. This developmental loss of layer 4 sensory encoding precision would contribute to subsequent developmental alterations in layer 4-to-layer 2/3 connectivity and plasticity observed in Fmr1-KO mice, and circuit dysfunction underlying sensory hypersensitivity."
24. Distal inhibitory control of sensory-evoked excitation (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015)
Model of a cortical layer (L) 2 pyramidal neuron embedded in an anatomically realistic network of two barrel columns in rat vibrissal cortex. This model is used to investigate the effects of spatially and temporally specific inhibition from L1 inhibitory interneurons on the sensory-evoked subthreshold responses of the L2 pyramidal neuron, and can be used to create simulation results underlying Figures 3D, 4B, 4C and 4E from (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015).
25. Duration-tuned neurons from the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat (Aubie et al. 2009)
dtnet is a generalized neural network simulator written in C++ with an easy to use XML description language to generate arbitrary neural networks and then run simulations covering many different parameter values. For example, you can specify ranges of parameter values for several different connection weights and then automatically run simulations over all possible parameters. Graphing ability is built in as long as the free, open-source, graphing application GLE (http://glx.sourceforge.net/) is installed. Included in the examples folder are simulation descriptions that were used to generate the results in Aubie et al. (2009). Refer to the README file for instructions on compiling and running these examples. The most recent source code can be obtained from GitHub: <a href="https://github.com/baubie/dtnet">https://github.com/baubie/dtnet</a>
26. Duration-tuned neurons from the inferior colliculus of vertebrates (Aubie et al. 2012)
These models reproduce the responses of duration-tuned neurons in the auditory midbrain of the big brown bat, the rat, the mouse and the frog (Aubie et al. 2012). They are written in the Python interface to NEURON and a subset of the figures from Aubie et al. (2012) are pre-set in run.py (raw data is generated and a separate graphing program must be used to visualize the results).
27. Efficient simulation environment for modeling large-scale cortical processing (Richert et al. 2011)
"We have developed a spiking neural network simulator, which is both easy to use and computationally efficient, for the generation of large-scale computational neuroscience models. The simulator implements current or conductance based Izhikevich neuron networks, having spike-timing dependent plasticity and short-term plasticity. ..."
28. Electrically-coupled Retzius neurons (Vazquez et al. 2009)
"Dendritic electrical coupling increases the number of effective synaptic inputs onto neurons by allowing the direct spread of synaptic potentials from one neuron to another. Here we studied the summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) produced locally and arriving from the coupled neuron (transjunctional) in pairs of electrically-coupled Retzius neurons of the leech. We combined paired recordings of EPSPs, the production of artificial EPSPs (APSPs) in neuron pairs with different coupling coefficients and simulations of EPSPs produced in the coupled dendrites. ..."
29. Functional properties of dendritic gap junctions in Cerebellar Golgi cells (Szoboszlay et al. 2016)
" ... We investigated the properties of gap junctions in cerebellar interneurons by combining paired somato-somatic and somato-dendritic recordings, anatomical reconstructions, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and modeling. By fitting detailed compartmental models of Golgi cells to their somato-dendritic voltage responses, we determined their passive electrical properties and the mean gap junction conductance (0.9 nS). ..."
30. Gamma and theta rythms in biophysical models of hippocampus circuits (Kopell et al. 2011)
" ... the main rhythms displayed by the hippocampus, the gamma (30–90 Hz) and theta (4–12 Hz) rhythms. We concentrate on modeling in vitro experiments, but with an eye toward possible in vivo implications. ... We use simpler biophysical models; all cells have a single compartment only, and the interneurons are restricted to two types: fast-spiking (FS) basket cells and oriens lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM) cells. ... , we aim not so much at reproducing dynamics in great detail, but at clarifying the essential mechanisms underlying the production of the rhythms and their interactions (Kopell, 2005). ..."
31. Gamma genesis in the basolateral amygdala (Feng et al 2019)
Using in vitro and in vivo data we develop the first large-scale biophysically and anatomically realistic model of the basolateral amygdala nucleus (BL), which reproduces the dynamics of the in vivo local field potential (LFP). Significantly, it predicts that BL intrinsically generates the transient gamma oscillations observed in vivo. The model permitted exploration of the poorly understood synaptic mechanisms underlying gamma genesis in BL, and the model's ability to compute LFPs at arbitrary numbers of recording sites provided insights into the characteristics of the spatial properties of gamma bursts. Furthermore, we show how gamma synchronizes principal cells to overcome their low firing rates while simultaneously promoting competition, potentially impacting their afferent selectivity and efferent drive, and thus emotional behavior.
32. Gap junction coupled network of striatal fast spiking interneurons (Hjorth et al. 2009)
Gap junctions between striatal FS neurons has very weak ability to synchronise spiking. Input uncorrelated between neighbouring neurons is shunted, while correlated input is not.
33. Gap-junction coupled network activity depends on coupled dendrites diameter (Gansert et al. 2007)
"... We have previously shown that the amplitude of electrical signals propagating across gap-junctionally coupled passive cables is maximized at a unique diameter. This suggests that threshold-dependent signals may propagate through gap junctions for a finite range of diameters around this optimal value. Here we examine the diameter dependence of action potential propagation across model networks of dendro-dendritically coupled neurons. The neurons in these models have passive soma and dendrites and an action potential-generating axon. We show that propagation of action potentials across gap junctions occurs only over a finite range of dendritic diameters and that propagation delay depends on this diameter. ...". See paper for more and details.
34. Gating of steering signals through phasic modulation of reticulospinal neurons (Kozlov et al. 2014)
" ... We use the lamprey as a model for investigating the role of this phasic modulation of the reticulospinal activity, because the brainstem–spinal cord networks are known down to the cellular level in this phylogenetically oldest extant vertebrate. We describe how the phasic modulation of reticulospinal activity from the spinal CPG ensures reliable steering/turning commands without the need for a very precise timing of on- or offset, by using a biophysically detailed large-scale (19,600 model neurons and 646,800 synapses) computational model of the lamprey brainstem–spinal cord network. To verify that the simulated neural network can control body movements, including turning, the spinal activity is fed to a mechanical model of lamprey swimming. ..."
35. Grid cell oscillatory interference with noisy network oscillators (Zilli and Hasselmo 2010)
To examine whether an oscillatory interference model of grid cell activity could work if the oscillators were noisy neurons, we implemented these simulations. Here the oscillators are networks (either synaptically- or gap-junction--coupled) of one or more noisy neurons (either Izhikevich's simple model or a Hodgkin-Huxley--type biophysical model) which drive a postsynaptic cell (which may be integrate-and-fire, resonate-and-fire, or the simple model) which should fire spatially as a grid cell if the simulation is successful.
36. Grid cells from place cells (Castro & Aguiar, 2014)
" ...Here we present a novel model for the emergence of gridlike firing patterns that stands on two key hypotheses: (1) spatial information in GCs is provided from PC activity and (2) grid fields result from a combined synaptic plasticity mechanism involving inhibitory and excitatory neurons mediating the connections between PCs and GCs. ..."
37. High frequency stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus (Rubin and Terman 2004)
" ... Using a computational model, this paper considers the hypothesis that DBS works by replacing pathologically rhythmic basal ganglia output with tonic, high frequency firing. In our simulations of parkinsonian conditions, rhythmic inhibition from GPi to the thalamus compromises the ability of thalamocortical relay (TC) cells to respond to depolarizing inputs, such as sensorimotor signals. High frequency stimulation of STN regularizes GPi firing, and this restores TC responsiveness, despite the increased frequency and amplitude of GPi inhibition to thalamus that result. We provide a mathematical phase plane analysis of the mechanisms that determine TC relay capabilities in normal, parkinsonian, and DBS states in a reduced model. This analysis highlights the differences in deinactivation of the low-threshold calcium T -current that we observe in TC cells in these different conditions. ..."
38. Hippocampal CA3 network and circadian regulation (Stanley et al. 2013)
This model produces the hippocampal CA3 neural network model used in the paper below. It has two modes of operation, a default mode and a circadian mode. In the circadian mode, parameters are swept through a range of values. This model can be quite easily adapted to produce theta and gamma oscillations, as certain parameter sweeps will reveal (see Figures). BASH scripts interact with GENESIS 2.3 to implement parameter sweeps. The model contains four cell types derived from prior papers. CA3 pyramidal are derived from Traub et al (1991); Basket, stratum oriens (O-LM), and Medial Septal GABAergic (MSG) interneurons are taken from Hajos et al (2004).
39. Hotspots of dendritic spine turnover facilitates new spines and NN sparsity (Frank et al 2018)
Model for the following publication: Adam C. Frank, Shan Huang, Miou Zhou, Amos Gdalyahu, George Kastellakis, Panayiota Poirazi, Tawnie K. Silva, Ximiao Wen, Joshua T. Trachtenberg, and Alcino J. Silva Hotspots of Dendritic Spine Turnover Facilitate Learning-related Clustered Spine Addition and Network Sparsity
40. Human tactile FA1 neurons (Hay and Pruszynski 2020)
"... we show that synaptic integration across the complex signals from the first-order neuronal population could underlie human ability to accurately (< 3°) and rapidly process the orientation of edges moving across the fingertip. We first derive spiking models of human first-order tactile neurons that fit and predict responses to moving edges with high accuracy. We then use the model neurons in simulating the peripheral neuronal population that innervates a fingertip. We train classifiers performing synaptic integration across the neuronal population activity, and show that synaptic integration across first-order neurons can process edge orientations with high acuity and speed. ... our models suggest that integration of fast-decaying (AMPA-like) synaptic inputs within short timescales is critical for discriminating fine orientations, whereas integration of slow-decaying (NMDA-like) synaptic inputs supports discrimination of coarser orientations and maintains robustness over longer timescales"
41. I&F recurrent networks with current- or conductance-based synapses (Cavallari et al. 2014)
Recurrent networks of two populations (excitatory and inhibitory) of randomly connected Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) neurons with either current- or conductance-based synapses from the paper S. Cavallari, S. Panzeri and A. Mazzoni (2014)
42. Interplay between somatic and dendritic inhibition promotes place fields (Pedrosa & Clopath 2020)
Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are thought to encode spatial information. A subset of these cells, named place cells, are active only when the animal traverses a specific region within the environment. Although vastly studied experimentally, the development and stabilization of place fields are not fully understood. Here, we propose a mechanistic model of place cell formation in the hippocampal CA1 region. Using our model, we reproduce place field dynamics observed experimentally and provide a mechanistic explanation for the stabilization of place fields. Finally, our model provides specific predictions on protocols to shift place field location.
43. Investigation of different targets in deep brain stimulation for Parkinson`s (Pirini et al. 2009)
"We investigated by a computational model of the basal ganglia the different network effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD) in different target sites in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), and the globus pallidus pars externa (GPe). A cellular-based model of the basal ganglia system (BGS), based on the model proposed by Rubin and Terman (J Comput Neurosci 16:211–235, 2004), was developed. ... Our results suggest that DBS in the STN could functionally restore the TC relay activity, while DBS in the GPe and in the GPi could functionally over-activate and inhibit it, respectively. Our results are consistent with the experimental and the clinical evidences on the network effects of DBS."
44. Lateral dendrodenditic inhibition in the Olfactory Bulb (David et al. 2008)
Mitral cells, the principal output neurons of the olfactory bulb, receive direct synaptic activation from primary sensory neurons. Shunting inhibitory inputs delivered by granule cell interneurons onto mitral cell lateral dendrites are believed to influence spike timing and underlie coordinated field potential oscillations. Lateral dendritic shunt conductances delayed spiking to a degree dependent on both their electrotonic distance and phase of onset. Recurrent inhibition significantly narrowed the distribution of mitral cell spike times, illustrating a tendency towards coordinated synchronous activity. This result suggests an essential role for early mechanisms of temporal coordination in olfaction. The model was adapted from Davison et al, 2003, but include additional noise mechanisms, long lateral dendrite, and specific synaptic point processes.
45. Lateral entorhinal cortex network model (Traub and Whittington, in press)
Circuits of multicompartment cells, including fan cells, layer 2 and layer 3 pyramidal cells, and multiple interneuron types; developed from model of piriform cortex (Traub, Tu and Whittington, Reviews in the Neurosciences), and Traub and Whittington, PNAS 2022
46. Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
47. Locust olfactory network with GGN and full KC population in the mushroom body (Ray et al 2020)
We reconstructed the GGN (giant GABAergic neuron) morphology from 3D confocal image stack, and built a passive model based on the morphology to study signal attenuation across this giant neuron. In order to study the effect of feedback inhibition from this cell on odor information processing, we created a model of the olfactory network in the locust mushroom body with 50,000 KCs (Kenyon cell) reciprocally connected to this neuron. Finally, we added a model of the IG (Inhibitor of GGN) to reproduce in vivo odor responses in GGN.
48. Mechanisms of very fast oscillations in axon networks coupled by gap junctions (Munro, Borgers 2010)
Axons connected by gap junctions can produce very fast oscillations (VFOs, > 80 Hz) when stimulated randomly at a low rate. The models here explore the mechanisms of VFOs that can be seen in an axonal plexus, (Munro & Borgers, 2009): a large network model of an axonal plexus, small network models of axons connected by gap junctions, and an implementation of the model underlying figure 12 in Traub et al. (1999) . The large network model consists of 3,072 5-compartment axons connected in a random network. The 5-compartment axons are the 5 axonal compartments from the CA3 pyramidal cell model in Traub et al. (1994) with a fixed somatic voltage. The random network has the same parameters as the random network in Traub et al. (1999), and axons are stimulated randomly via a Poisson process with a rate of 2/s/axon. The small network models simulate waves propagating through small networks of axons connected by gap junctions to study how local connectivity affects the refractory period.
49. Mitral cell activity gating by respiration and inhibition in an olfactory bulb NN (Short et al 2016)
To explore interactions between respiration, inhibition, and olfaction, experiments using light to active channel rhodopsin in sensory neurons expressing Olfactory Marker Protein were performed in mice and modeled in silico. This archive contains NEURON models that were run on parallel computers to explore the interactions between varying strengths of respiratory activity and olfactory sensory neuron input and the roles of periglomerular, granule, and external tufted cells in shaping mitral cell responses.
50. Model of arrhythmias in a cardiac cells network (Casaleggio et al. 2014)
" ... Here we explore the possible processes leading to the occasional onset and termination of the (usually) non-fatal arrhythmias widely observed in the heart. Using a computational model of a two-dimensional network of cardiac cells, we tested the hypothesis that an ischemia alters the properties of the gap junctions inside the ischemic area. ... In conclusion, our model strongly supports the hypothesis that non-fatal arrhythmias can develop from post-ischemic alteration of the electrical connectivity in a relatively small area of the cardiac cell network, and suggests experimentally testable predictions on their possible treatments."
51. Modeling dendritic spikes and plasticity (Bono and Clopath 2017)
Biophysical model and reduced neuron model with voltage-dependent plasticity.
52. Modelling platform of the cochlear nucleus and other auditory circuits (Manis & Compagnola 2018)
"Models of the auditory brainstem have been an invaluable tool for testing hypotheses about auditory information processing and for highlighting the most important gaps in the experimental literature. Due to the complexity of the auditory brainstem, and indeed most brain circuits, the dynamic behavior of the system may be difficult to predict without a detailed, biologically realistic computational model. Despite the sensitivity of models to their exact construction and parameters, most prior models of the cochlear nucleus have incorporated only a small subset of the known biological properties. This confounds the interpretation of modelling results and also limits the potential future uses of these models, which require a large effort to develop. To address these issues, we have developed a general purpose, bio-physically detailed model of the cochlear nucleus for use both in testing hypotheses about cochlear nucleus function and also as an input to models of downstream auditory nuclei. The model implements conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley representations of cells using a Python-based interface to the NEURON simulator. ..."
53. Models for cortical UP-DOWN states in a bistable inhibitory-stabilized network (Jercog et al 2017)
In the idling brain, neuronal circuits transition between periods of sustained firing (UP state) and quiescence (DOWN state), a pattern the mechanisms of which remain unclear. We analyzed spontaneous cortical population activity from anesthetized rats and found that UP and DOWN durations were highly variable and that population rates showed no significant decay during UP periods. We built a network rate model with excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) populations exhibiting a novel bistable regime between a quiescent and an inhibition-stabilized state of arbitrarily low rate, where fluctuations triggered state transitions. In addition, we implemented these mechanisms in a more biophysically realistic spiking network, where DOWN-to-UP transitions are caused by synchronous high-amplitude events impinging onto the network.
54. Modulation of septo-hippocampal theta activity by GABAA receptors (Hajos et al. 2004)
Theta frequency oscillation of the septo-hippocampal system has been considered as a prominent activity associated with cognitive function and affective processes. ... In the present experiments we applied a combination of computational and physiological techniques to explore the functional role of GABAA receptors in theta oscillation. ... In parallel to these experimental observations, a computational model has been constructed by implementing a septal GABA neuron model with a CA1 hippocampal model containing three types of neurons (including oriens and basket interneurons and pyramidal cells; latter modeled by multicompartmental techniques; for detailed model description with network parameters see online addendum: http://geza.kzoo.edu/theta). This connectivity made the network capable of simulating the responses of the septo-hippocampal circuitry to the modulation of GABAA transmission, and the presently described computational model proved suitable to reveal several aspects of pharmacological modulation of GABAA receptors. In addition, computational findings indicated different roles of distinctively located GABAA receptors in theta generation.
55. Multiplication by NMDA receptors in Direction Selective Ganglion cells (Poleg-Polsky & Diamond 2016)
The model demonstrates how signal amplification with NMDARs depends on the synaptic environment. When direction selectivity (DS) detection is mediated by DS inhibition, NMDARs multiply other synaptic conductances. In the case of DS tuned excitation, NMDARs contribute additively.
56. Multiscale model of excitotoxicity in PD (Muddapu and Chakravarthy 2020)
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc). Although the exact cause of cell death is not clear, the hypothesis that metabolic deficiency is a key factor has been gaining attention in recent years. In the present study, we investigate this hypothesis using a multi-scale computational model of the subsystem of the basal ganglia comprising Subthalamic Nucleus (STN), Globus Pallidus externa (GPe) and SNc. The proposed model is a multiscale model in that interactions among the three nuclei are simulated using more abstract Izhikevich neuron models, while the molecular pathways involved in cell death of SNc neurons are simulated in terms of detailed chemical kinetics. Simulation results obtained from the proposed model showed that energy deficiencies occurring at cellular and network levels could precipitate the excitotoxic loss of SNc neurons in PD. At the subcellular level, the models show how calcium elevation leads to apoptosis of SNc neurons. The therapeutic effects of several neuroprotective interventions are also simulated in the model. From neuroprotective studies, it was clear that glutamate inhibition and apoptotic signal blocker therapies were able to halt the progression of SNc cell loss when compared to other therapeutic interventions, which only slows down the progression of SNc cell loss.
57. Neocort. pyramidal cells subthreshold somatic voltage controls spike propagation (Munro Kopell 2012)
There is suggestive evidence that pyramidal cell axons in neocortex may be coupled by gap junctions into an ``axonal plexus" capable of generating Very Fast Oscillations (VFOs) with frequencies exceeding 80 Hz. It is not obvious, however, how a pyramidal cell in such a network could control its output when action potentials are free to propagate from the axons of other pyramidal cells into its own axon. We address this problem by means of simulations based on 3D reconstructions of pyramidal cells from rat somatosensory cortex. We show that somatic depolarization enables propagation via gap junctions into the initial segment and main axon, while somatic hyperpolarization disables it. We show further that somatic voltage cannot effectively control action potential propagation through gap junctions on minor collaterals; action potentials may therefore propagate freely from such collaterals regardless of somatic voltage. In previous work, VFOs are all but abolished during the hyperpolarization phase of slow-oscillations induced by anesthesia in vivo. This finding constrains the density of gap junctions on collaterals in our model and suggests that axonal sprouting due to cortical lesions may result in abnormally high gap junction density on collaterals, leading in turn to excessive VFO activity and hence to epilepsy via kindling.
58. NETMORPH: creates NNs with realistic neuron morphologies (Koene et al. 2009, van Ooyen et al. 2014)
NETMORPH is a simulation tool for building synaptically connected networks with realistic neuron morphologies. Axonal and dendritic morphologies are created by using stochastic rules for the behavior of individual growth cones, the structures at the tip of outgrowing axons and dendrites that mediate elongation and branching. Axons and dendrites are not guided by any extracellular cues. Synapses are formed when crossing axonal and dendritic segments come sufficiently close to each other. See the README in the archive for more information.
59. Nonlinear dendritic processing in barrel cortex spiny stellate neurons (Lavzin et al. 2012)
This is a multi-compartmental simulation of a spiny stellate neuron which is stimulated by a thalamocortical (TC) and cortico-cortical (CC) inputs. No other cells are explicitly modeled; the presynaptic network activation is represented by the number of active synapses. Preferred and non –preferred thalamic directions thus correspond to larder/smaller number of TC synapses. This simulation revealed that randomly activated synapses can cooperatively trigger global NMDA spikes, which involve participation of most of the dendritic tree. Surprisingly, we found that although the voltage profile of the cell was uniform, the calcium influx was restricted to ‘hot spots’ which correspond to synaptic clusters or large conductance synapses
60. Norns - Neural Network Studio (Visser & Van Gils 2014)
The Norns - Neural Network Studio is a software package for designing, simulation and analyzing networks of spiking neurons. It consists of three parts: 1. "Urd": a Matlab frontend with high-level functions for quickly defining networks 2. "Verdandi": an optimized C++ simulation environment which runs the simulation defined by Urd 3. "Skuld": an advanced Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) for visual inspection of simulated data.
61. Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule cell circuits (Migliore & McTavish 2013)
Model files for the entry "Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule Cell Circuits" of the Springer Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience by Michele Migliore and Tom Mctavish. The simulations illustrate two typical Mitral-Granule cell circuits in the olfactory bulb of vertebrates: distance-independent lateral inhibition and gating effects.
62. Pallidostriatal projections promote beta oscillations (Corbit, Whalen, et al 2016)
This model consists of an inhibitory loop combining the projections from GPe neurons back to the striatum (shown experimentally to predominantly affect fast spiking interneurons, FSIs), together with the coupling from FSIs to medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum, along with the projections from MSNs to GPe. All models are in the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism, adapted from previously published models for each cell type. The connected circuit produces irregular activity under control conditions, but increasing FSI-to-MSN connectivity as observed experimentally under dopamine depletion yields exaggerated beta oscillations and synchrony. Additional mechanistic aspects are also explored.
63. PING, ING and CHING network models for Gamma oscillations in cortex (Susin and Destexhe accepted)
These models were published at: Susin E, Destexhe A. 2021. Integration, coincidence detection and resonance in networks of spiking neurons expressing gamma oscillations and asynchronous states. bioRxiv doi: 10.1101/2021.05.03.442436 In this article, we constructed conductance-based network models of gamma oscillations, based on different cell types found in cerebral cortex: Regular Spiking (RS), Fast Spiking (FS) and Chattering cells. The models were adjusted to extracellular unit recordings in humans, where gamma oscillations always coexist with the asynchronous firing mode. We considered three different mechanisms to generate Gamma, first a mechanism based on the interaction between pyramidal neurons and interneurons (PING), second a mechanism in which gamma is generated in interneuron networks (ING) and third, a mechanism which relies on gamma oscillations generated by pacemaker Chattering neurons (CHING). We found that in all cases, the presence of Gamma oscillations tends to diminish the responsiveness of the networks to external inputs. We tested different paradigms and found none in which Gamma oscillations would favor information flow compared to asynchronous states.
64. Place and grid cells in a loop (Rennó-Costa & Tort 2017)
This model implements a loop circuit between place and grid cells. The model was used to explain place cell remapping and grid cell realignment. Grid cell model as a continuous attractor network. Place cells have recurrent attractor network. Rate models implemented with E%-MAX winner-take-all network dynamics, with gamma cycle time-step.
65. Principles of Computational Modelling in Neuroscience (Book) (Sterratt et al. 2011)
"... This book provides a step-by-step account of how to model the neuron and neural circuitry to understand the nervous system at all levels, from ion channels to networks. Starting with a simple model of the neuron as an electrical circuit, gradually more details are added to include the effects of neuronal morphology, synapses, ion channels and intracellular signaling. The principle of abstraction is explained through chapters on simplifying models, and how simplified models can be used in networks. This theme is continued in a final chapter on modeling the development of the nervous system. Requiring an elementary background in neuroscience and some high school mathematics, this textbook is an ideal basis for a course on computational neuroscience."
66. Purkinje neuron network (Zang et al. 2020)
Both spike rate and timing can transmit information in the brain. Phase response curves (PRCs) quantify how a neuron transforms input to output by spike timing. PRCs exhibit strong firing-rate adaptation, but its mechanism and relevance for network output are poorly understood. Using our Purkinje cell (PC) model we demonstrate that the rate adaptation is caused by rate-dependent subthreshold membrane potentials efficiently regulating the activation of Na+ channels. Then we use a realistic PC network model to examine how rate-dependent responses synchronize spikes in the scenario of reciprocal inhibition-caused high-frequency oscillations. The changes in PRC cause oscillations and spike correlations only at high firing rates. The causal role of the PRC is confirmed using a simpler coupled oscillator network model. This mechanism enables transient oscillations between fast-spiking neurons that thereby form PC assemblies. Our work demonstrates that rate adaptation of PRCs can spatio-temporally organize the PC input to cerebellar nuclei.
67. Pyramidal neuron, fast, regular, and irregular spiking interneurons (Konstantoudaki et al 2014)
This is a model network of prefrontal cortical microcircuit based primarily on rodent data. It includes 16 pyramidal model neurons, 2 fast spiking interneuron models, 1 regular spiking interneuron model and 1 irregular spiking interneuron model. The goal of the paper was to use this model network to determine the role of specific interneuron subtypes in persistent activity
68. Sensory-evoked responses of L5 pyramidal tract neurons (Egger et al 2020)
This is the L5 pyramidal tract neuron (L5PT) model from Egger, Narayanan et al., Neuron 2020. It allows investigating how synaptic inputs evoked by different sensory stimuli are integrated by the complex intrinsic properties of L5PTs. The model is constrained by anatomical measurements of the subcellular synaptic input patterns to L5PT neurons, in vivo measurements of sensory-evoked responses of different populations of neurons providing these synaptic inputs, and in vitro measurements constraining the biophysical properties of the soma, dendrites and axon (note: the biophysical model is based on the work by Hay et al., Plos Comp Biol 2011). The model files provided here allow performing simulations and analyses presented in Figures 3, 4 and 5.
69. Simulation studies on mechanisms of levetiracetam-mediated inhibition of IK(DR) (Huang et al. 2009)
Levetiracetam (LEV) is an S-enantiomer pyrrolidone derivative with established antiepileptic efficacy in generalized epilepsy and partial epilepsy. However, its effects on ion currents and membrane potential remain largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of LEV on differentiated NG108-15 neurons. ... Simulation studies in a modified Hodgkin-Huxley neuron and network unraveled that the reduction of slowly inactivating IK(DR) resulted in membrane depolarization accompanied by termination of the firing of action potentials in a stochastic manner. Therefore, the inhibitory effects on slowly inactivating IK(DR) (Kv3.1-encoded current) may constitute one of the underlying mechanisms through which LEV affects neuronal activity in vivo.
70. Single compartment Dorsal Lateral Medium Spiny Neuron w/ NMDA and AMPA (Biddell and Johnson 2013)
A biophysical single compartment model of the dorsal lateral striatum medium spiny neuron is presented here. The model is an implementation then adaptation of a previously described model (Mahon et al. 2002). The model has been adapted to include NMDA and AMPA receptor models that have been fit to dorsal lateral striatal neurons. The receptor models allow for excitation by other neuron models.
71. Small world networks of Type I and Type II Excitable Neurons (Bogaard et al. 2009)
Implemented with NEURON 5.9, four model neurons with varying excitability properties affect the spatiotemporal patterning of small world networks of homogeneous and heterogeneous cell population.
72. Spike burst-pause dynamics of Purkinje cells regulate sensorimotor adaptation (Luque et al 2019)
"Cerebellar Purkinje cells mediate accurate eye movement coordination. However, it remains unclear how oculomotor adaptation depends on the interplay between the characteristic Purkinje cell response patterns, namely tonic, bursting, and spike pauses. Here, a spiking cerebellar model assesses the role of Purkinje cell firing patterns in vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) adaptation. The model captures the cerebellar microcircuit properties and it incorporates spike-based synaptic plasticity at multiple cerebellar sites. ..."
73. Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
74. State dependent drug binding to sodium channels in the dentate gyrus (Thomas & Petrou 2013)
A Markov model of sodium channels was developed that includes drug binding to fast inactivated states. This was incorporated into a model of the dentate gyrus to investigate the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on neuron and network properties.
75. Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
76. Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.
77. Striatal NN model of MSNs and FSIs investigated effects of dopamine depletion (Damodaran et al 2015)
This study investigates the mechanisms that are affected in the striatal network after dopamine depletion and identifies potential therapeutic targets to restore normal activity.
78. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
79. Synchronization by D4 dopamine receptor-mediated phospholipid methylation (Kuznetsova, Deth 2008)
"We describe a new molecular mechanism of dopamine-induced membrane protein modulation that can tune neuronal oscillation frequency to attention related gamma rhythm. This mechanism is based on the unique ability of D4 dopamine receptors (D4R) to carry out phospholipid methylation (PLM) that may affect the kinetics of ion channels. We show that by deceasing the inertia of the delayed rectifier potassium channel, a transition to 40 Hz oscillations can be achieved. ..."
80. Synchrony by synapse location (McTavish et al. 2012)
This model considers synchrony between mitral cells induced via shared granule cell interneurons while taking into account the spatial constraints of the system. In particular, since inhibitory inputs decay passively along the lateral dendrites, this model demonstrates that an optimal arrangement of the inhibitory synapses will be near the cell bodies of the relevant mitral cells.
81. Thalamic transformation of pallidal input (Hadipour-Niktarash 2006)
"In Parkinson’s disease, neurons of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) display the low-frequency tremor-related oscillations. These oscillatory activities are transmitted to the thalamic relay nuclei. Computer models of the interacting thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons were used to explore how the TC-RE network processes the low-frequency oscillations of the GPi neurons. ..."
82. The neocortical microcircuit collaboration portal (Markram et al. 2015)
"This portal provides an online public resource of the Blue Brain Project's first release of a digital reconstruction of the microcircuitry of juvenile Rat somatosensory cortex, access to experimental data sets used in the reconstruction, and the resulting models."
83. Theory of sequence memory in neocortex (Hawkins & Ahmad 2016)
"... First we show that a neuron with several thousand synapses segregated on active dendrites can recognize hundreds of independent patterns of cellular activity even in the presence of large amounts of noise and pattern variation. We then propose a neuron model where patterns detected on proximal dendrites lead to action potentials, defining the classic receptive field of the neuron, and patterns detected on basal and apical dendrites act as predictions by slightly depolarizing the neuron without generating an action potential. By this mechanism, a neuron can predict its activation in hundreds of independent contexts. We then present a network model based on neurons with these properties that learns time-based sequences. ..."
84. Visual physiology of the layer 4 cortical circuit in silico (Arkhipov et al 2018)
"Despite advances in experimental techniques and accumulation of large datasets concerning the composition and properties of the cortex, quantitative modeling of cortical circuits under in-vivo-like conditions remains challenging. Here we report and publicly release a biophysically detailed circuit model of layer 4 in the mouse primary visual cortex, receiving thalamo- cortical visual inputs. The 45,000-neuron model was subjected to a battery of visual stimuli, and results were compared to published work and new in vivo experiments. ..."

Re-display model names without descriptions