Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Action Potential Initiation

(The spatial pattern or sequence of ion channel and/or receptor activation that precedes an action potential.)
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    Models   Description
1. Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
2. Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
3. Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
4. Olfactory bulb cluster formation (Migliore et al. 2010)
Functional roles of distributed synaptic clusters in the mitral-granule cell network of the olfactory bulb.
5. Parallel odor processing by mitral and middle tufted cells in the OB (Cavarretta et al 2016, 2018)
"[...] experimental findings suggest that MC and mTC may encode parallel and complementary odor representations. We have analyzed the functional roles of these pathways by using a morphologically and physiologically realistic three-dimensional model to explore the MC and mTC microcircuits in the glomerular layer and deeper plexiform layers. [...]"
6. Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
7. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
8. Thalamic network model of deep brain stimulation in essential tremor (Birdno et al. 2012)
"... Thus the decreased effectiveness of temporally irregular DBS trains is due to long pauses in the stimulus trains, not the degree of temporal irregularity alone. We also conducted computer simulations of neuronal responses to the experimental stimulus trains using a biophysical model of the thalamic network. Trains that suppressed tremor in volunteers also suppressed fluctuations in thalamic transmembrane potential at the frequency associated with cerebellar burst-driver inputs. Clinical and computational findings indicate that DBS suppresses tremor by masking burst-driver inputs to the thalamus and that pauses in stimulation prevent such masking. Although stimulation of other anatomic targets may provide tremor suppression, we propose that the most relevant neuronal targets for effective tremor suppression are the afferent cerebellar fibers that terminate in the thalamus."

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