Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Temporal Pattern Generation

(Neuron or neural network whose time varying activity (voltage or action potentials) creates a pattern. Examples: constant, or decreasing frequencies of spikes.)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. 3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 and the NEURON code of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
2. A model of the temporal pattern generator of C. elegans egg-laying behavior (Zhang et. al 2010)
"... We suggest that the HSN neuron is the executive neuron driving egg-laying events. We propose that the VC neurons act as "single egg counters" that inhibit HSN activity for short periods in response to individual egg-laying events. We further propose that the uv1 neuroendocrine cells are "cluster counters", which inhibit HSN activity for longer periods and are responsible for the time constant of the inactive phase. Together they form an integrated circuit that drives the clustered egg-laying pattern. ..."
3. A single column thalamocortical network model (Traub et al 2005)
To better understand population phenomena in thalamocortical neuronal ensembles, we have constructed a preliminary network model with 3,560 multicompartment neurons (containing soma, branching dendrites, and a portion of axon). Types of neurons included superficial pyramids (with regular spiking [RS] and fast rhythmic bursting [FRB] firing behaviors); RS spiny stellates; fast spiking (FS) interneurons, with basket-type and axoaxonic types of connectivity, and located in superficial and deep cortical layers; low threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, that contacted principal cell dendrites; deep pyramids, that could have RS or intrinsic bursting (IB) firing behaviors, and endowed either with non-tufted apical dendrites or with long tufted apical dendrites; thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells; and nucleus reticularis (nRT) cells. To the extent possible, both electrophysiology and synaptic connectivity were based on published data, although many arbitrary choices were necessary.
4. A spiking model of cortical broadcast and competition (Shanahan 2008)
"This paper presents a computer model of cortical broadcast and competition based on spiking neurons and inspired by the hypothesis of a global neuronal workspace underlying conscious information processing in the human brain. In the model, the hypothesised workspace is realised by a collection of recurrently interconnected regions capable of sustaining and disseminating a reverberating spatial pattern of activation. ..."
5. A spiking neural network model of the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus (Sen-Bhattacharya et al 2017)
Using Izhikevich's spiking neuron models, to build a network with a biologically informed synaptic layout emulating the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.
6. Broadening of activity with flow across neural structures (Lytton et al. 2008)
"Synfire chains have long been suggested as a substrate for perception and information processing in the nervous system. However, embedding activation chains in a densely connected nervous matrix risks spread of signal that will obscure or obliterate the message. We used computer modeling and physiological measurements in rat hippocampus to assess this problem of activity broadening. We simulated a series of neural modules with feedforward propagation and random connectivity within each module and from one module to the next. ..."
7. Collection of simulated data from a thalamocortical network model (Glabska, Chintaluri, Wojcik 2017)
"A major challenge in experimental data analysis is the validation of analytical methods in a fully controlled scenario where the justification of the interpretation can be made directly and not just by plausibility. ... One solution is to use simulations of realistic models to generate ground truth data. In neuroscience, creating such data requires plausible models of neural activity, access to high performance computers, expertise and time to prepare and run the simulations, and to process the output. To facilitate such validation tests of analytical methods we provide rich data sets including intracellular voltage traces, transmembrane currents, morphologies, and spike times. ... The data were generated using the largest publicly available multicompartmental model of thalamocortical network (Traub et al. 2005), with activity evoked by different thalamic stimuli."
8. Computational aspects of feedback in neural circuits (Maass et al 2006)
It had previously been shown that generic cortical microcircuit models can perform complex real-time computations on continuous input streams, provided that these computations can be carried out with a rapidly fading memory. We investigate ... the computational capability of such circuits in the more realistic case where not only readout neurons, but in addition a few neurons within the circuit have been trained for specific tasks. This is essentially equivalent to the case where the output of trained readout neurons is fed back into the circuit. We show that this new model overcomes the limitation of a rapidly fading memory. In fact, we prove that in the idealized case without noise it can carry out any conceiv- able digital or analog computation on time-varying inputs. But even with noise the resulting computational model can perform a large class of biologically relevant real-time computations that require a non-fading memory. ... In particular we show that ... generic cortical microcircuits with feedback provide a new model for working memory that is consistent with a large set of biological constraints. See paper for more and details.
9. Computational Model of a Central Pattern Generator (Cataldo et al 2006)
The buccal ganglia of Aplysia contain a central pattern generator (CPG) that mediates rhythmic movements of the foregut during feeding. This CPG is a multifunctional circuit and generates at least two types of buccal motor patterns (BMPs), one that mediates ingestion (iBMP) and another that mediates rejection (rBMP). The present study used a computational approach to examine the ways in which an ensemble of identified cells and synaptic connections function as a CPG. Hodgkin-Huxley-type models were developed that mimicked the biophysical properties of these cells and synaptic connections. The results suggest that the currently identified ensemble of cells is inadequate to produce rhythmic neural activity and that several key elements of the CPG remain to be identified.
10. Current Dipole in Laminar Neocortex (Lee et al. 2013)
Laminar neocortical model in NEURON/Python, adapted from Jones et al 2009. https://bitbucket.org/jonescompneurolab/corticaldipole
11. Different roles for inhibition in the rhythm-generating respiratory network (Harris et al 2017)
"Unraveling the interplay of excitation and inhibition within rhythm-generating networks remains a fundamental issue in neuroscience. We use a biophysical model to investigate the different roles of local and long-range inhibition in the respiratory network, a key component of which is the pre-Bötzinger complex inspiratory microcircuit. ..."
12. Encoding and retrieval in a model of the hippocampal CA1 microcircuit (Cutsuridis et al. 2009)
This NEURON code implements a small network model (100 pyramidal cells and 4 types of inhibitory interneuron) of storage and recall of patterns in the CA1 region of the mammalian hippocampus. Patterns of PC activity are stored either by a predefined weight matrix generated by Hebbian learning, or by STDP at CA3 Schaffer collateral AMPA synapses.
13. Fast global oscillations in networks of I&F neurons with low firing rates (Brunel and Hakim 1999)
Dynamics of a network of sparsely connected inhibitory current-based integrate-and-fire neurons. Individual neurons fire irregularly at low rate but the network is in an oscillatory global activity regime where neurons are weakly synchronized.
14. Feedforward heteroassociative network with HH dynamics (Lytton 1998)
Using the original McCulloch-Pitts notion of simple on and off spike coding in lieu of rate coding, an Anderson-Kohonen artificial neural network (ANN) associative memory model was ported to a neuronal network with Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics.
15. Formation of synfire chains (Jun and Jin 2007)
"Temporally precise sequences of neuronal spikes that span hundreds of milliseconds are observed in many brain areas, including songbird premotor nucleus, cat visual cortex, and primary motor cortex. Synfire chains—networks in which groups of neurons are connected via excitatory synapses into a unidirectional chain—are thought to underlie the generation of such sequences. It is unknown, however, how synfire chains can form in local neural circuits, especially for long chains. Here, we show through computer simulation that long synfire chains can develop through spike-time dependent synaptic plasticity and axon remodeling—the pruning of prolific weak connections that follows the emergence of a finite number of strong connections. ..."
16. Gap-junction coupled network activity depends on coupled dendrites diameter (Gansert et al. 2007)
"... We have previously shown that the amplitude of electrical signals propagating across gap-junctionally coupled passive cables is maximized at a unique diameter. This suggests that threshold-dependent signals may propagate through gap junctions for a finite range of diameters around this optimal value. Here we examine the diameter dependence of action potential propagation across model networks of dendro-dendritically coupled neurons. The neurons in these models have passive soma and dendrites and an action potential-generating axon. We show that propagation of action potentials across gap junctions occurs only over a finite range of dendritic diameters and that propagation delay depends on this diameter. ...". See paper for more and details.
17. Gating of steering signals through phasic modulation of reticulospinal neurons (Kozlov et al. 2014)
" ... We use the lamprey as a model for investigating the role of this phasic modulation of the reticulospinal activity, because the brainstem–spinal cord networks are known down to the cellular level in this phylogenetically oldest extant vertebrate. We describe how the phasic modulation of reticulospinal activity from the spinal CPG ensures reliable steering/turning commands without the need for a very precise timing of on- or offset, by using a biophysically detailed large-scale (19,600 model neurons and 646,800 synapses) computational model of the lamprey brainstem–spinal cord network. To verify that the simulated neural network can control body movements, including turning, the spinal activity is fed to a mechanical model of lamprey swimming. ..."
18. Generating coherent patterns of activity from chaotic neural networks (Sussillo and Abbott 2009)
"Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. ... Our results reproduce data on premovement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated."
19. Hippocampus temporo-septal engram shift model (Lytton 1999)
Temporo-septal engram shift model of hippocampal memory. The model posits that memories gradually move along the hippocampus from a temporal encoding site to ever more septal sites from which they are recalled. We propose that the sense of time is encoded by the location of the engram along the temporo-septal axis.
20. Hopfield and Brody model (Hopfield, Brody 2000)
NEURON implementation of the Hopfield and Brody model from the papers: JJ Hopfield and CD Brody (2000) JJ Hopfield and CD Brody (2001). Instructions are provided in the below readme.txt file.
21. Hopfield and Brody model (Hopfield, Brody 2000) (NEURON+python)
Demonstration of Hopfield-Brody snychronization using artificial cells in NEURON+python.
22. Information-processing in lamina-specific cortical microcircuits (Haeusler and Maass 2006)
A major challenge for computational neuroscience is to understand the computational function of lamina-specific synaptic connection patterns in stereotypical cortical microcircuits.We approach this problem by studying ... the dynamical system defined by more realistic cortical microcircuit models as a whole and by investigating the influence that its laminar structure has on the transmission and fusion of information within this dynamical system. The circuit models that we examine consist of Hodgkin--Huxley neurons with dynamic synapses... We investigate to what extent this cortical microcircuit template supports the accumulation and fusion of information contained in generic spike inputs into layer 4 and layers 2/3 and how well it makes this information accessible to projection neurons in layers 2/3 and layer 5. ... We conclude that computer simulations of detailed lamina-specific cortical microcircuit models provide new insight into computational consequences of anatomical and physiological data. See paper for more and details.
23. Interaction of leak and IMI conductance on the STG over broad temperature range (Stadele et al 2015)
The ZIP file contains a Hodgkin-Huxley based circuit model and the simulation environment MadSim used to study the interaction of leak and IMI on the gastric mill network of the crab (Cancer borealis) as represented in (C. Städele, S. Heigele and W. Stein, 2015) MadSim, the simulation environment used for this study, is freeware and included in the package.
24. Irregular oscillations produced by cyclic recurrent inhibition (Friesen, Friesen 1994)
Model of recurrent cyclic inhibition as described on p.119 of Friesen and Friesen (1994), which was slightly modified from Szekely's model (1965) of a network for producing alternating limb movements.
25. Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
26. Lateral dendrodenditic inhibition in the Olfactory Bulb (David et al. 2008)
Mitral cells, the principal output neurons of the olfactory bulb, receive direct synaptic activation from primary sensory neurons. Shunting inhibitory inputs delivered by granule cell interneurons onto mitral cell lateral dendrites are believed to influence spike timing and underlie coordinated field potential oscillations. Lateral dendritic shunt conductances delayed spiking to a degree dependent on both their electrotonic distance and phase of onset. Recurrent inhibition significantly narrowed the distribution of mitral cell spike times, illustrating a tendency towards coordinated synchronous activity. This result suggests an essential role for early mechanisms of temporal coordination in olfaction. The model was adapted from Davison et al, 2003, but include additional noise mechanisms, long lateral dendrite, and specific synaptic point processes.
27. Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
28. Long time windows from theta modulated inhib. in entorhinal–hippo. loop (Cutsuridis & Poirazi 2015)
"A recent experimental study (Mizuseki et al., 2009) has shown that the temporal delays between population activities in successive entorhinal and hippocampal anatomical stages are longer (about 70–80 ms) than expected from axon conduction velocities and passive synaptic integration of feed-forward excitatory inputs. We investigate via computer simulations the mechanisms that give rise to such long temporal delays in the hippocampus structures. ... The model shows that the experimentally reported long temporal delays in the DG, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions are due to theta modulated somatic and axonic inhibition..."
29. Loss of phase-locking in non-weakly coupled inhib. networks of type-I neurons (Oh and Matveev 2009)
... Here we examine the loss of synchrony caused by an increase in inhibitory coupling in networks of type-I Morris–Lecar model oscillators, which is characterized by a period-doubling cascade and leads to mode-locked states with alternation in the firing order of the two cells, as reported recently by Maran and Canavier (J Comput Nerosci, 2008) for a network of Wang-Buzsáki model neurons. Although alternating-order firing has been previously reported as a near-synchronous state, we show that the stable phase difference between the spikes of the two Morris–Lecar cells can constitute as much as 70% of the unperturbed oscillation period. Further, we examine the generality of this phenomenon for a class of type-I oscillators that are close to their excitation thresholds, and provide an intuitive geometric description of such “leap-frog” dynamics. ..."
30. Motion Clouds: Synthesis of random textures for motion perception (Leon et al. 2012)
We describe a framework to generate random texture movies with controlled information content. In particular, these stimuli can be made closer to naturalistic textures compared to usual stimuli such as gratings and random-dot kinetograms. We simplified the definition to parametrically define these "Motion Clouds" around the most prevalent feature axis (mean and bandwith): direction, spatial frequency, orientation.
31. Multistability of clustered states in a globally inhibitory network (Chandrasekaran et al. 2009)
"We study a network of m identical excitatory cells projecting excitatory synaptic connections onto a single inhibitory interneuron, which is reciprocally coupled to all excitatory cells through inhibitory synapses possessing short-term synaptic depression. We find that such a network with global inhibition possesses multiple stable activity patterns with distinct periods, characterized by the clustering of the excitatory cells into synchronized sub-populations. We prove the existence and stability of n-cluster solutions in a m-cell network. ... Implications for temporal coding and memory storage are discussed."
32. Network bursts in cultured NN result from different adaptive mechanisms (Masquelier & Deco 2013)
It is now well established that cultured neuron networks are spontaneously active, and tend to synchronize. Synchronous events typically involve the whole network, and have thus been termed “network spikes” (NS). Using experimental recordings and numerical simulations, we show here that the inter-NS interval statistics are complex, and allow inferring the neural mechanisms at work, in particular the adaptive ones, and estimating a number of parameters to which we cannot access experimentally.
33. Neural model of frog ventilatory rhythmogenesis (Horcholle-Bossavit and Quenet 2009)
"In the adult frog respiratory system, periods of rhythmic movements of the buccal floor are interspersed by lung ventilation episodes. The ventilatory activity results from the interaction of two hypothesized oscillators in the brainstem. Here, we model these oscillators with two coupled neural networks, whose co-activation results in the emergence of new dynamics. .. The biological interest of this formal model is illustrated by the persistence of the relevant dynamical features when perturbations are introduced in the model, i.e. dynamic noises and architecture modifications. The implementation of the networks with clock-driven continuous time neurones provides simulations with physiological time scales."
34. Neural modeling of an internal clock (Yamazaki and Tanaka 2008)
"We studied a simple random recurrent inhibitory network. Despite its simplicity, the dynamics was so rich that activity patterns of neurons evolved with time without recurrence due to random recurrent connections among neurons. The sequence of activity patterns was generated by the trigger of an external signal, and the generation was stable against noise.... Therefore, a time passage from the trigger of an external signal could be represented by the sequence of activity patterns, suggesting that this model could work as an internal clock. ..."
35. Neural transformations on spike timing information (Tripp and Eliasmith 2007)
" ... Here we employ computational methods to show that an ensemble of neurons firing at a constant mean rate can induce arbitrarily chosen temporal current patterns in postsynaptic cells. ..."
36. Neuronal population models of intracerebral EEG (Wendling et al. 2005)
"... In this study, the authors relate electrophysiologic patterns typically observed during the transition from interictal to ictal activity in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) to mechanisms (at a neuronal population level) involved in seizure generation through a computational model of EEG activity. Intracerebral EEG signals recorded from hippocampus in five patients with MTLE during four periods (during interictal activity, just before seizure onset, during seizure onset, and during ictal activity) were used to identify the three main parameters of a model of hippocampus EEG activity (related to excitation, slow dendritic inhibition and fast somatic inhibition). ... . Results demonstrated that the model generates very realistic signals for automatically identified parameters. They also showed that the transition from interictal to ictal activity cannot be simply explained by an increase in excitation and a decrease in inhibition but rather by time-varying ensemble interactions between pyramidal cells and local interneurons projecting to either their dendritic or perisomatic region (with slow and fast GABAA kinetics). Particularly, during preonset activity, an increasing dendritic GABAergic inhibition compensates a gradually increasing excitation up to a brutal drop at seizure onset when faster oscillations (beta and low gamma band, 15 to 40 Hz) are observed. ... These findings obtained from model identification in human temporal lobe epilepsy are in agreement with some results obtained experimentally, either on animal models of epilepsy or on the human epileptic tissue."
37. Oscillations, phase-of-firing coding and STDP: an efficient learning scheme (Masquelier et al. 2009)
The model demonstrates how a common oscillatory drive for a group of neurons formats and reliabilizes their spike times - through an activation-to-phase conversion - so that repeating activation patterns can be easily detected and learned by a downstream neuron equipped with STDP, and then recognized in just one oscillation cycle.
38. Parallel odor processing by mitral and middle tufted cells in the OB (Cavarretta et al 2016, 2018)
"[...] experimental findings suggest that MC and mTC may encode parallel and complementary odor representations. We have analyzed the functional roles of these pathways by using a morphologically and physiologically realistic three-dimensional model to explore the MC and mTC microcircuits in the glomerular layer and deeper plexiform layers. [...]"
39. Phase oscillator models for lamprey central pattern generators (Varkonyi et al. 2008)
In our paper, Varkonyi et al. 2008, we derive phase oscillator models for the lamprey central pattern generator from two biophysically based segmental models. We study intersegmental coordination and show how these models can provide stable intersegmental phase lags observed in real animals.
40. Polychronization: Computation With Spikes (Izhikevich 2005)
"We present a minimal spiking network that can polychronize, that is, exhibit reproducible time-locked but not synchronous firing patterns with millisecond precision, as in synfire braids. The network consists of cortical spiking neurons with axonal conduction delays and spiketiming- dependent plasticity (STDP); a ready-to-use MATLAB code is included. It exhibits sleeplike oscillations, gamma (40 Hz) rhythms, conversion of firing rates to spike timings, and other interesting regimes. ... To our surprise, the number of coexisting polychronous groups far exceeds the number of neurons in the network, resulting in an unprecedented memory capacity of the system. ..."
41. Population models of temporal differentiation (Tripp and Eliasmith 2010)
"Temporal derivatives are computed by a wide variety of neural circuits, but the problem of performing this computation accurately has received little theoretical study. Here we systematically compare the performance of diverse networks that calculate derivatives using cell-intrinsic adaptation and synaptic depression dynamics, feedforward network dynamics, and recurrent network dynamics. Examples of each type of network are compared by quantifying the errors they introduce into the calculation and their rejection of high-frequency input noise. ..."
42. Regulation of a slow STG rhythm (Nadim et al 1998)
Frequency regulation of a slow rhythm by a fast periodic input. Nadim, F., Manor, Y., Nusbaum, M. P., Marder, E. (1998) J. Neurosci. 18: 5053-5067
43. Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.
44. Respiratory central pattern generator network in mammalian brainstem (Rubin et al. 2009)
This model is a reduced version of a spatially organized respiratory central pattern generation network consisting of four neuronal populations (pre-I, early-I, post-I, and aug-E). In this reduction, each population is represented by a single neuron, in an activity-based framework (which includes the persistent sodium current for the pre-I population). The model includes three sources of external drive and can produce several experimentally observed rhythms.
45. Robust Reservoir Generation by Correlation-Based Learning (Yamazaki & Tanaka 2008)
"Reservoir computing (RC) is a new framework for neural computation. A reservoir is usually a recurrent neural network with fixed random connections. In this article, we propose an RC model in which the connections in the reservoir are modifiable. ... We apply our RC model to trace eyeblink conditioning. The reservoir bridged the gap of an interstimulus interval between the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, and a readout neuron was able to learn and express the timed conditioned response."
46. Scaling self-organizing maps to model large cortical networks (Bednar et al 2004)
Self-organizing computational models with specific intracortical connections can explain many functional features of visual cortex, such as topographic orientation and ocular dominance maps. ... This article introduces two techniques that make large simulations practical. First, we show how parameter scaling equations can be derived for laterally connected self-organizing models. These equations result in quantitatively equivalent maps over a wide range of simulation sizes, making it possible to debug small simulations and then scale them up only when needed. ... Second, we use parameter scaling to implement a new growing map method called GLISSOM, which dramatically reduces the memory and computational requirements of large self-organizing networks. See paper for more and details.
47. Simulation system of spinal cord motor nuclei and assoc. nerves and muscles (Cisi and Kohn 2008)
A Web-based simulation system of the spinal cord circuitry responsible for muscle control is described. The simulator employs two-compartment motoneuron models for S, FR and FF types, with synaptic inputs acting through conductance variations. Four motoneuron pools with their associated interneurons are represented in the simulator, with the possibility of inclusion of more than 2,000 neurons and 2,000,000 synapses. ... Inputs to the motoneuron pool come from populations of interneurons (Ia reciprocal inhibitory interneurons, Ib interneurons, and Renshaw cells) and from stochastic point processes associated with descending tracts. ... The generation of the H-reflex by the Ia-motoneuron pool system and its modulation by spinal cord interneurons is included in the simulation system.
48. Slow wave propagation in the guinea-pig gastric antrum (Hirst et al. 2006, Edwards and Hirst 2006)
"(Edwards and Hirst 2006) provides an electrical description of the propagation of slow waves and pacemaker potentials in the guinea-pig gastric antrum in anal and circumferential directions. As electrical conduction between laterally adjacent circular muscle bundles is regularly interrupted, anal conduction of pacemaker potentials was assumed to occur via an electrically interconnected chain of myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCMY). ICCMY were also connected resistively to serially connected compartments of longitudinal muscle. Circumferential conduction occurred in a circular smooth muscle bundle that was represented as a chain of electrically connected isopotential compartments: each compartment contained a proportion of intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCIM) that are responsible for the regenerative component of the slow wave. The circular muscle layer, which contains ICCIM, and the ICCMY network incorporated a mechanism, modelled as a two-stage chemical reaction, which produces an intracellular messenger. ... The model generates pacemaker potentials and slow waves with propagation velocities similar to those determined in the physiological experiments described in the accompanying paper."
49. State-dependent rhythmogenesis in a half-center locomotor CPG (Ausburn et al 2017)
"The spinal locomotor central pattern generator (CPG) generates rhythmic activity with alternating flexion and extension phases. This rhythmic pattern is likely to result from inhibitory interactions between neural populations representing flexor and extensor half-centers. However, it is unclear whether the flexor-extensor CPG has a quasi-symmetric organization with both half-centers critically involved in rhythm generation, features an asymmetric organization with flexor-driven rhythmogenesis, or comprises a pair of intrinsically rhythmic half-centers. There are experimental data that support each of the above concepts but appear to be inconsistent with the others. In this theoretical/modeling study, we present and analyze a CPG model architecture that can operate in different regimes consistent with the above three concepts depending on conditions, which are defined by external excitatory drives to CPG half-centers. We show that control of frequency and phase durations within each regime depends on network dynamics, defined by the regime-dependent expression of the half-centers' intrinsic rhythmic capabilities and the operating phase transition mechanisms (escape vs. release). Our study suggests state dependency in locomotor CPG operation and proposes explanations for seemingly contradictory experimental data."
50. Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
51. Thalamic network model of deep brain stimulation in essential tremor (Birdno et al. 2012)
"... Thus the decreased effectiveness of temporally irregular DBS trains is due to long pauses in the stimulus trains, not the degree of temporal irregularity alone. We also conducted computer simulations of neuronal responses to the experimental stimulus trains using a biophysical model of the thalamic network. Trains that suppressed tremor in volunteers also suppressed fluctuations in thalamic transmembrane potential at the frequency associated with cerebellar burst-driver inputs. Clinical and computational findings indicate that DBS suppresses tremor by masking burst-driver inputs to the thalamus and that pauses in stimulation prevent such masking. Although stimulation of other anatomic targets may provide tremor suppression, we propose that the most relevant neuronal targets for effective tremor suppression are the afferent cerebellar fibers that terminate in the thalamus."
52. Thalamic quiescence of spike and wave seizures (Lytton et al 1997)
A phase plane analysis of a two cell interaction between a thalamocortical neuron (TC) and a thalamic reticularis neuron (RE).
53. Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1994)
Demo for simulating networks of thalamic reticular neurons (reproduces figures from Destexhe A et al 1994)
54. The activity phase of postsynaptic neurons (Bose et al 2004)
We show, in a simplified network consisting of an oscillator inhibiting a follower neuron, how the interaction between synaptic depression and a transient potassium current in the follower neuron determines the activity phase of this neuron. We derive a mathematical expression to determine at what phase of the oscillation the follower neuron becomes active. This expression can be used to understand which parameters determine the phase of activity of the follower as the frequency of the oscillator is changed. See paper for more.

Re-display model names without descriptions