Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Active Dendrites

(These dendrites contain electrically excitable (voltage-gated) channels in the membrane.)
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    Models   Description
1. 3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 and the NEURON code of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
2. 3D olfactory bulb: operators (Migliore et al, 2015)
"... Using a 3D model of mitral and granule cell interactions supported by experimental findings, combined with a matrix-based representation of glomerular operations, we identify the mechanisms for forming one or more glomerular units in response to a given odor, how and to what extent the glomerular units interfere or interact with each other during learning, their computational role within the olfactory bulb microcircuit, and how their actions can be formalized into a theoretical framework in which the olfactory bulb can be considered to contain "odor operators" unique to each individual. ..."
3. Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
4. CA1 pyr cell: Inhibitory modulation of spatial selectivity+phase precession (Grienberger et al 2017)
Spatially uniform synaptic inhibition enhances spatial selectivity and temporal coding in CA1 place cells by suppressing broad out-of-field excitation.
5. Cancelling redundant input in ELL pyramidal cells (Bol et al. 2011)
The paper investigates the property of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of the brain of weakly electric fish to cancel predictable stimuli. Electroreceptors on the skin encode all signals in their firing activity, but superficial pyramidal (SP) cells in the ELL that receive this feedforward input do not respond to constant sinusoidal signals. This cancellation putatively occurs using a network of feedback delay lines and burst-induced synaptic plasticity between the delay lines and the SP cell that learns to cancel the redundant input. Biologically, the delay lines are parallel fibres from cerebellar-like granule cells in the eminentia granularis posterior. A model of this network (e.g. electroreceptors, SP cells, delay lines and burst-induced plasticity) was constructed to test whether the current knowledge of how the network operates is sufficient to cancel redundant stimuli.
6. Distal inhibitory control of sensory-evoked excitation (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015)
Model of a cortical layer (L) 2 pyramidal neuron embedded in an anatomically realistic network of two barrel columns in rat vibrissal cortex. This model is used to investigate the effects of spatially and temporally specific inhibition from L1 inhibitory interneurons on the sensory-evoked subthreshold responses of the L2 pyramidal neuron, and can be used to create simulation results underlying Figures 3D, 4B, 4C and 4E from (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015).
7. Hippocampal basket cell gap junction network dynamics (Saraga et al. 2006)
2 cell network of hippocampal basket cells connected by gap junctions. Paper explores how distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.
8. Hotspots of dendritic spine turnover facilitates new spines and NN sparsity (Frank et al 2018)
Model for the following publication: Adam C. Frank, Shan Huang, Miou Zhou, Amos Gdalyahu, George Kastellakis, Panayiota Poirazi, Tawnie K. Silva, Ximiao Wen, Joshua T. Trachtenberg, and Alcino J. Silva Hotspots of Dendritic Spine Turnover Facilitate Learning-related Clustered Spine Addition and Network Sparsity
9. L5 PFC microcircuit used to study persistent activity (Papoutsi et al. 2014, 2013)
Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes.
10. Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
11. Lateral dendrodenditic inhibition in the Olfactory Bulb (David et al. 2008)
Mitral cells, the principal output neurons of the olfactory bulb, receive direct synaptic activation from primary sensory neurons. Shunting inhibitory inputs delivered by granule cell interneurons onto mitral cell lateral dendrites are believed to influence spike timing and underlie coordinated field potential oscillations. Lateral dendritic shunt conductances delayed spiking to a degree dependent on both their electrotonic distance and phase of onset. Recurrent inhibition significantly narrowed the distribution of mitral cell spike times, illustrating a tendency towards coordinated synchronous activity. This result suggests an essential role for early mechanisms of temporal coordination in olfaction. The model was adapted from Davison et al, 2003, but include additional noise mechanisms, long lateral dendrite, and specific synaptic point processes.
12. Microcircuits of L5 thick tufted pyramidal cells (Hay & Segev 2015)
"... We simulated detailed conductance-based models of TTCs (Layer 5 thick tufted pyramidal cells) forming recurrent microcircuits that were interconnected as found experimentally; the network was embedded in a realistic background synaptic activity. ... Our findings indicate that dendritic nonlinearities are pivotal in controlling the gain and the computational functions of TTCs microcircuits, which serve as a dominant output source for the neocortex. "
13. Model of memory linking through memory allocation (Kastellakis et al. 2016)
Here, we present a simplified, biophysically inspired network model that incorporates multiple plasticity processes and explains linking of information at three different levels: (a) learning of a single associative memory (b) rescuing of a weak memory when paired with a strong one and (c) linking of multiple memories across time. By dissecting synaptic from intrinsic plasticity and neuron-wide from dendritically restricted protein capture, the model reveals a simple, unifying principle: Linked memories share synaptic clusters within the dendrites of overlapping populations of neurons
14. NMDAR & GABAB/KIR Give Bistable Dendrites: Working Memory & Sequence Readout (Sanders et al., 2013)
" ...Here, we show that the voltage dependence of the inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) conductance activated by GABA(B) receptors adds substantial robustness to network simulations of bistability and the persistent firing that it underlies. The hyperpolarized state is robust because, at hyperpolarized potentials, the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is high and the NMDA conductance is low; the depolarized state is robust because, at depolarized potentials, the NMDA conductance is high and the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is low. Our results suggest that this complementary voltage dependence of GABA(B)/KIR and NMDA conductances makes them a "perfect couple" for producing voltage bistability."
15. Nonlinear dendritic processing in barrel cortex spiny stellate neurons (Lavzin et al. 2012)
This is a multi-compartmental simulation of a spiny stellate neuron which is stimulated by a thalamocortical (TC) and cortico-cortical (CC) inputs. No other cells are explicitly modeled; the presynaptic network activation is represented by the number of active synapses. Preferred and non –preferred thalamic directions thus correspond to larder/smaller number of TC synapses. This simulation revealed that randomly activated synapses can cooperatively trigger global NMDA spikes, which involve participation of most of the dendritic tree. Surprisingly, we found that although the voltage profile of the cell was uniform, the calcium influx was restricted to ‘hot spots’ which correspond to synaptic clusters or large conductance synapses
16. Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell column formation (Migliore et al. 2007)
In the olfactory bulb, the processing units for odor discrimination are believed to involve dendrodendritic synaptic interactions between mitral and granule cells. There is increasing anatomical evidence that these cells are organized in columns, and that the columns processing a given odor are arranged in widely distributed arrays. Experimental evidence is lacking on the underlying learning mechanisms for how these columns and arrays are formed. We have used a simplified realistic circuit model to test the hypothesis that distributed connectivity can self-organize through an activity-dependent dendrodendritic synaptic mechanism. The results point to action potentials propagating in the mitral cell lateral dendrites as playing a critical role in this mechanism, and suggest a novel and robust learning mechanism for the development of distributed processing units in a cortical structure.
17. Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell: dendrodendritic microcircuits (Migliore and Shepherd 2008)
This model shows how backpropagating action potentials in the long lateral dendrites of mitral cells, together with granule cell actions on mitral cells within narrow columns forming glomerular units, can provide a mechanism to activate strong local inhibition between arbitrarily distant mitral cells. The simulations predict a new role for the dendrodendritic synapses in the multicolumnar organization of the granule cells.
18. Olfactory bulb mitral cell gap junction NN model: burst firing and synchrony (O`Connor et al. 2012)
In a network of 6 mitral cells connected by gap junction in the apical dendrite tuft, continuous current injections of 0.06 nA are injected into 20 locations in the apical tufts of two of the mitral cells. The current injections into one of the cells starts 10 ms after the other to generate asynchronous firing in the cells (Migliore et al. 2005 protocol). Firing of the cells is asynchronous for the first 120 ms. However after the burst firing phase is completed the firing in all cells becomes synchronous.
19. Olfactory bulb mitral cell: synchronization by gap junctions (Migliore et al 2005)
In a realistic model of two electrically connected mitral cells, the paper shows that the somatically-measured experimental properties of Gap Junctions (GJs) may correspond to a variety of different local coupling strengths and dendritic distributions of GJs in the tuft. The model suggests that the propagation of the GJ-induced local tuft depolarization is a major mechanim for intraglomerular synchronization of mitral cells.
20. Olfactory Bulb mitral-granule network generates beta oscillations (Osinski & Kay 2016)
This model of the dendrodendritic mitral-granule synaptic network generates gamma and beta oscillations as a function of the granule cell excitability, which is represented by the granule cell resting membrane potential.
21. Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule cell circuits (Migliore & McTavish 2013)
Model files for the entry "Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule Cell Circuits" of the Springer Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience by Michele Migliore and Tom Mctavish. The simulations illustrate two typical Mitral-Granule cell circuits in the olfactory bulb of vertebrates: distance-independent lateral inhibition and gating effects.
22. Parallel odor processing by mitral and middle tufted cells in the OB (Cavarretta et al 2016, 2018)
"[...] experimental findings suggest that MC and mTC may encode parallel and complementary odor representations. We have analyzed the functional roles of these pathways by using a morphologically and physiologically realistic three-dimensional model to explore the MC and mTC microcircuits in the glomerular layer and deeper plexiform layers. [...]"
23. Principles of Computational Modelling in Neuroscience (Book) (Sterratt et al. 2011)
"... This book provides a step-by-step account of how to model the neuron and neural circuitry to understand the nervous system at all levels, from ion channels to networks. Starting with a simple model of the neuron as an electrical circuit, gradually more details are added to include the effects of neuronal morphology, synapses, ion channels and intracellular signaling. The principle of abstraction is explained through chapters on simplifying models, and how simplified models can be used in networks. This theme is continued in a final chapter on modeling the development of the nervous system. Requiring an elementary background in neuroscience and some high school mathematics, this textbook is an ideal basis for a course on computational neuroscience."
24. Pyramidal neuron, fast, regular, and irregular spiking interneurons (Konstantoudaki et al 2014)
This is a model network of prefrontal cortical microcircuit based primarily on rodent data. It includes 16 pyramidal model neurons, 2 fast spiking interneuron models, 1 regular spiking interneuron model and 1 irregular spiking interneuron model. The goal of the paper was to use this model network to determine the role of specific interneuron subtypes in persistent activity
25. Theory of sequence memory in neocortex (Hawkins & Ahmad 2016)
"... First we show that a neuron with several thousand synapses segregated on active dendrites can recognize hundreds of independent patterns of cellular activity even in the presence of large amounts of noise and pattern variation. We then propose a neuron model where patterns detected on proximal dendrites lead to action potentials, defining the classic receptive field of the neuron, and patterns detected on basal and apical dendrites act as predictions by slightly depolarizing the neuron without generating an action potential. By this mechanism, a neuron can predict its activation in hundreds of independent contexts. We then present a network model based on neurons with these properties that learns time-based sequences. ..."

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