Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Synaptic Integration

(A neuron's presynaptic partners are adding neurotransmitters to the synaptic clefts either in pulses which correlate with presynaptic action potentials or continuously in a graded response to presynaptic activity.)
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    Models   Description
1. 3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 and the NEURON code of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
2. 3D olfactory bulb: operators (Migliore et al, 2015)
"... Using a 3D model of mitral and granule cell interactions supported by experimental findings, combined with a matrix-based representation of glomerular operations, we identify the mechanisms for forming one or more glomerular units in response to a given odor, how and to what extent the glomerular units interfere or interact with each other during learning, their computational role within the olfactory bulb microcircuit, and how their actions can be formalized into a theoretical framework in which the olfactory bulb can be considered to contain "odor operators" unique to each individual. ..."
3. A model of the femur-tibia control system in stick insects (Stein et al. 2008)
We studied the femur-tibia joint control system of the insect leg, and its switch between resistance reflex in posture control and "active reaction" in walking. The "active reaction" is basically a reversal of the resistance reflex. Both responses are elicited by the same sensory input and the same neuronal network (the femur-tibia network). The femur-tibia network was modeled by fitting the responses of model neurons to those obtained in animals. Each implemented neuron has a physiological counterpart. The strengths of 16 interneuronal pathways that integrate sensory input were then assigned three different values and varied independently, generating a database of more than 43 million network variants. The uploaded version contains the model that best represented the resistance reflex. Please see the README for more help. We demonstrate that the combinatorial code of interneuronal pathways determines motor output. A switch between different behaviors such as standing to walking can thus be achieved by altering the strengths of selected sensory integration pathways.
4. CA1 pyr cell: Inhibitory modulation of spatial selectivity+phase precession (Grienberger et al 2017)
Spatially uniform synaptic inhibition enhances spatial selectivity and temporal coding in CA1 place cells by suppressing broad out-of-field excitation.
5. Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
6. Distal inhibitory control of sensory-evoked excitation (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015)
Model of a cortical layer (L) 2 pyramidal neuron embedded in an anatomically realistic network of two barrel columns in rat vibrissal cortex. This model is used to investigate the effects of spatially and temporally specific inhibition from L1 inhibitory interneurons on the sensory-evoked subthreshold responses of the L2 pyramidal neuron, and can be used to create simulation results underlying Figures 3D, 4B, 4C and 4E from (Egger, Schmitt et al. 2015).
7. Effect of polysynaptic facilitaiton between piriform-hippocampal network stages (Trieu et al 2015)
This is a model of a multistage network with stages representing regions and synaptic contacts from the olfactory cortex to region CA1 of the hippocampus in Brian2 spiking neural network simulator (Trieu et al 2015). It is primarily designed to assess how synaptic facilitation at multiple stages in response to theta firing changes the output of the network. Further developments will be posted at: github.com/cdcox/multistage_network This model was prepared by Conor D Cox, University of California, Irvine For questions please contact Conor at cdcox1@gmail.com
8. Electrically-coupled Retzius neurons (Vazquez et al. 2009)
"Dendritic electrical coupling increases the number of effective synaptic inputs onto neurons by allowing the direct spread of synaptic potentials from one neuron to another. Here we studied the summation of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) produced locally and arriving from the coupled neuron (transjunctional) in pairs of electrically-coupled Retzius neurons of the leech. We combined paired recordings of EPSPs, the production of artificial EPSPs (APSPs) in neuron pairs with different coupling coefficients and simulations of EPSPs produced in the coupled dendrites. ..."
9. Gamma oscillations in hippocampal interneuron networks (Bartos et al 2002)
To examine whether an interneuron network with fast inhibitory synapses can act as a gamma frequency oscillator, we developed an interneuron network model based on experimentally determined properties. In comparison to previous interneuron network models, our model was able to generate oscillatory activity with higher coherence over a broad range of frequencies (20-110 Hz). In this model, high coherence and flexibility in frequency control emerge from the combination of synaptic properties, network structure, and electrical coupling.
10. Human tactile FA1 neurons (Hay and Pruszynski 2020)
"... we show that synaptic integration across the complex signals from the first-order neuronal population could underlie human ability to accurately (< 3°) and rapidly process the orientation of edges moving across the fingertip. We first derive spiking models of human first-order tactile neurons that fit and predict responses to moving edges with high accuracy. We then use the model neurons in simulating the peripheral neuronal population that innervates a fingertip. We train classifiers performing synaptic integration across the neuronal population activity, and show that synaptic integration across first-order neurons can process edge orientations with high acuity and speed. ... our models suggest that integration of fast-decaying (AMPA-like) synaptic inputs within short timescales is critical for discriminating fine orientations, whereas integration of slow-decaying (NMDA-like) synaptic inputs supports discrimination of coarser orientations and maintains robustness over longer timescales"
11. Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
12. Multiplication by NMDA receptors in Direction Selective Ganglion cells (Poleg-Polsky & Diamond 2016)
The model demonstrates how signal amplification with NMDARs depends on the synaptic environment. When direction selectivity (DS) detection is mediated by DS inhibition, NMDARs multiply other synaptic conductances. In the case of DS tuned excitation, NMDARs contribute additively.
13. Nonlinear dendritic processing in barrel cortex spiny stellate neurons (Lavzin et al. 2012)
This is a multi-compartmental simulation of a spiny stellate neuron which is stimulated by a thalamocortical (TC) and cortico-cortical (CC) inputs. No other cells are explicitly modeled; the presynaptic network activation is represented by the number of active synapses. Preferred and non –preferred thalamic directions thus correspond to larder/smaller number of TC synapses. This simulation revealed that randomly activated synapses can cooperatively trigger global NMDA spikes, which involve participation of most of the dendritic tree. Surprisingly, we found that although the voltage profile of the cell was uniform, the calcium influx was restricted to ‘hot spots’ which correspond to synaptic clusters or large conductance synapses
14. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated recurrent networks (Sadeh and Rotter, 2015)
Emergence of contrast-invariant orientation selectivity in large-scale networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons using integrate-and-fire neuron models.
15. Parallel odor processing by mitral and middle tufted cells in the OB (Cavarretta et al 2016, 2018)
"[...] experimental findings suggest that MC and mTC may encode parallel and complementary odor representations. We have analyzed the functional roles of these pathways by using a morphologically and physiologically realistic three-dimensional model to explore the MC and mTC microcircuits in the glomerular layer and deeper plexiform layers. [...]"
16. Sensory-evoked responses of L5 pyramidal tract neurons (Egger et al 2020)
This is the L5 pyramidal tract neuron (L5PT) model from Egger, Narayanan et al., Neuron 2020. It allows investigating how synaptic inputs evoked by different sensory stimuli are integrated by the complex intrinsic properties of L5PTs. The model is constrained by anatomical measurements of the subcellular synaptic input patterns to L5PT neurons, in vivo measurements of sensory-evoked responses of different populations of neurons providing these synaptic inputs, and in vitro measurements constraining the biophysical properties of the soma, dendrites and axon (note: the biophysical model is based on the work by Hay et al., Plos Comp Biol 2011). The model files provided here allow performing simulations and analyses presented in Figures 3, 4 and 5.
17. Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
18. Thalamocortical augmenting response (Bazhenov et al 1998)
In the cortical model, augmenting responses were more powerful in the "input" layer compared with those in the "output" layer. Cortical stimulation of the network model produced augmenting responses in cortical neurons in distant cortical areas through corticothalamocortical loops and low-threshold intrathalamic augmentation. ... The predictions of the model were compared with in vivo recordings from neurons in cortical area 4 and thalamic ventrolateral nucleus of anesthetized cats. The known intrinsic properties of thalamic cells and thalamocortical interconnections can account for the basic properties of cortical augmenting responses. See reference for details. NEURON implementation note: cortical SU cells are getting slightly too little stimulation - reason unknown.

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