Circuits that contain the Neuron : Retina bipolar GLU cell

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    Models   Description
1. A network model of the vertebrate retina (Publio et al. 2009)
In this work, we use a minimal conductance-based model of the ON rod pathways in the vertebrate retina to study the effects of electrical synaptic coupling via gap junctions among rods and among AII amacrine cells on the dynamic range of the retina. The model is also used to study the effects of the maximum conductance of rod hyperpolarization activated current Ih on the dynamic range of the retina, allowing a study of the interrelations between this intrinsic membrane parameter with those two retina connectivity characteristics.
2. COREM: configurable retina simulator (Martínez-Cañada et al., 2016)
COREM is a configurable simulator for retina modeling that has been implemented within the framework of the Human Brain Project (HBP). The software platform can be interfaced with neural simulators (e.g., NEST) to connect with models of higher visual areas and with the Neurorobotics Platform of the HBP. The code is implemented in C++ and computations of spatiotemporal equations are optimized by means of recursive filtering techniques and multithreading. Most retina simulators are more focused on fitting specific retina functions. By contrast, the versatility of COREM allows the configuration of different retina models using a set of basic retina computational primitives. We implemented a series of retina models by combining these primitives to characterize some of the best-known phenomena observed in the retina: adaptation to the mean light intensity and temporal contrast, and differential motion sensitivity. The code has been extensively tested in Linux. The software can be also adapted to Mac OS. Installation instructions as well as the user manual can be found in the Github repository: https://github.com/pablomc88/COREM
3. Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.

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