Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Brain Rhythms

(Rhythms recorded in EEG or MEG fall into these and more ranges: delta (0.5–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–14 Hz), beta (14–30 Hz), gamma (30–80 Hz).)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. A Neural mass computational model of the Thalamocorticothalamic circuitry (Bhattacharya et al. 2011)
The model presented here is a bio-physically plausible version of a simple thalamo-cortical neural mass computational model proposed by Lopes da Silva in 1974 to simulate brain EEG activity within the alpha band (8-13 Hz). The thalamic and cortical circuitry are presented as separate modules in this model with cell populations as in biology. The connectivity between cell populations are as reported by Sherman, S. in Scholarpedia, 2006. The values of the synaptic connectivity parameters are as reported by Van Horn et al, 2000. In our paper (doi:10.1016/j.neunet.2011.02.009), we study the model behaviour while varying the values of the synaptic connectivity parameters (Cyyy) in the model about their respective 'basal' (intial) values.
2. A neural mass model for critical assessment of brain connectivity (Ursino et al 2020)
We use a neural mass model of interconnected regions of interest to simulate reliable neuroelectrical signals in the cortex. In particular, signals simulating mean field potentials were generated assuming two, three or four ROIs, connected via excitatory or by-synaptic inhibitory links. Then we investigated whether bivariate Transfer Entropy (TE) can be used to detect a statistically significant connection from data (as in binary 0/1 networks), and even if connection strength can be quantified (i.e., the occurrence of a linear relationship between TE and connection strength). Results suggest that TE can reliably estimate the strength of connectivity if neural populations work in their linear regions. However, nonlinear phenomena dramatically affect the assessment of connectivity, since they may significantly reduce TE estimation. Software included here allows the simulation of neural mass models with a variable number of ROIs and connections, the estimation of TE using the free package Trentool, and the realization of figures to compare true connectivity with estimated values.
3. A two networks model of connectivity-dependent oscillatory activity (Avella OJ et al. 2014)
Activity in a cortical network may express a single oscillation frequency, alternate between two or more distinct frequencies, or continually express multiple frequencies. In addition, oscillation amplitude may fluctuate over time. Interactions between oscillatory networks may contribute, but their effects are poorly known. Here, we created a two model networks, one generating on its own a relatively slow frequency (slow network) and one generating a fast frequency (fast network). We chose the slow or the fast network as source network projecting feed-forward connections to the other, or target network, and systematically investigated how type and strength of inter-network connections affected target network activity. Our results strongly depended on three factors: the type of the relevant (main) connection, its strength and the amount of source synapses. For high inter-network connection strengths, we found that the source network could completely impose its rhythm on the target network. Interestingly, the slow network was more effective at imposing its rhythm on the fast network than the other way around. The strongest entrainment occurred when excitatory cells of the slow network projected to excitatory or inhibitory cells of the fast network. Just as observed in rat activity at the prefrontal cortex satisfies the behavior described above, such that together, our results suggest that input from other oscillating networks may markedly alter a network’s frequency spectrum and may partly be responsible for the rich repertoire of temporal oscillation patterns observed in the brain.
4. A unified thalamic model of multiple distinct oscillations (Li, Henriquez and Fröhlich 2017)
We present a unified model of the thalamus that is capable of independently generating multiple distinct oscillations (delta, spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations) under different levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) modulation corresponding to different physiological conditions (deep sleep, light sleep, relaxed wakefulness and attention). The model also shows that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is state-dependent.
5. Alpha rhythm in vitro visual cortex (Traub et al 2020)
The paper describes an experimental model of the alpha rhythm generated by layer 4 pyramidal neurons in a visual cortex slice. The simulation model is derived from that of Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol, developed for thalamocortical oscillations.
6. Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
7. CA1 pyramidal cells, basket cells, ripples (Malerba et al 2016)
Model of CA1 pyramidal layer Ripple activity, triggered when receiving current input (to represent CA3 sharp-waves). Cells are Adaptive-Exponential Integrate and Fire neurons, receiving independent OU noise.
8. CA3 Network Model of Epileptic Activity (Sanjay et. al, 2015)
This computational study investigates how a CA3 neuronal network consisting of pyramidal cells, basket cells and OLM interneurons becomes epileptic when dendritic inhibition to pyramidal cells is impaired due to the dysfunction of OLM interneurons. After standardizing the baseline activity (theta-modulated gamma oscillations), systematic changes are made in the connectivities between the neurons, as a result of step-wise impairment of dendritic inhibition.
9. Cortical Basal Ganglia Network Model during Closed-loop DBS (Fleming et al 2020)
We developed a computational model of the cortical basal ganglia network to investigate closed-loop control of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD). The cortical basal ganglia network model incorporates the (i) the extracellular DBS electric field, (ii) antidromic and orthodromic activation of STN afferent fibers, (iii) the LFP detected at non-stimulating contacts on the DBS electrode and (iv) temporal variation of network beta-band activity within the thalamo-cortico-basal ganglia loop. The model facilitates investigation of clinically-viable closed-loop DBS control approaches, modulating either DBS amplitude or frequency, using an LFP derived measure of network beta-activity.
10. CRH modulates excitatory transmission and network physiology in hippocampus (Gunn et al. 2017)
This model simulates the effects of CRH on sharp waves in a rat CA1/CA3 model. It uses the frequency of the sharp waves as an output of the network.
11. Current Dipole in Laminar Neocortex (Lee et al. 2013)
Laminar neocortical model in NEURON/Python, adapted from Jones et al 2009. https://bitbucket.org/jonescompneurolab/corticaldipole
12. Distance-dependent inhibition in the hippocampus (Strüber et al. 2017)
Network model of a hippocampal circuit including interneurons and principal cells. Amplitude and decay time course of inhibitory synapses can be systematically changed for different distances between connected cells. Various forms of excitatory drives can be administered to the network including spatially structured input.
13. Dynamics of sleep oscillations coupled to brain temperature on multiple scales (Csernai et al 2019)
"Every form of neural activity depends on temperature, yet its relationship to brain rhythms is poorly understood. In this work we examined how sleep spindles are influenced by changing brain temperatures and how brain temperature is influenced by sleep oscillations. We employed a novel thermoelectrode designed for measuring temperature while recording neural activity. We found that spindle frequency is positively correlated and duration negatively correlated with brain temperature. Local heating of the thalamus replicated the temperature dependence of spindle parameters in the heated area only, suggesting biophysical rather than global modulatory mechanisms, a finding also supported by a thalamic network model. Finally, we show that switches between oscillatory states also influence brain temperature on a shorter and smaller scale. Epochs of paradoxical sleep as well as the infra-slow oscillation were associated with brain temperature fluctuations below 0.2°C. Our results highlight that brain temperature is massively intertwined with sleep oscillations on various time scales."
14. Electrodecrements in in vitro model of infantile spasms (Traub et al 2020)
The code is an extension of the thalamocortical model of Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol. It is here applied to an in vitro model of the electrodecremental response seen in the EEG of children with infantile spasms (West syndrome)
15. Engaging distinct oscillatory neocortical circuits (Vierling-Claassen et al. 2010)
"Selective optogenetic drive of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons (INs) leads to enhanced local field potential (LFP) power across the traditional “gamma” frequency band (20–80 Hz; Cardin et al., 2009). In contrast, drive to regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal cells enhances power at lower frequencies, with a peak at 8 Hz. The first result is consistent with previous computational studies emphasizing the role of FS and the time constant of GABAA synaptic inhibition in gamma rhythmicity. However, the same theoretical models do not typically predict low-frequency LFP enhancement with RS drive. To develop hypotheses as to how the same network can support these contrasting behaviors, we constructed a biophysically principled network model of primary somatosensory neocortex containing FS, RS, and low-threshold spiking (LTS) INs. ..."
16. Functional consequences of cortical circuit abnormalities on gamma in schizophrenia (Spencer 2009)
"Schizophrenia is characterized by cortical circuit abnormalities, which might be reflected in gamma-frequency (30–100 Hz) oscillations in the electroencephalogram. Here we used a computational model of cortical circuitry to examine the effects that neural circuit abnormalities might have on gamma generation and network excitability. The model network consisted of 1000 leaky integrateand- fi re neurons with realistic connectivity patterns and proportions of neuron types [pyramidal cells (PCs), regular-spiking inhibitory interneurons, and fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs)]. ... The results of this study suggest that a multimodal approach, combining non-invasive neurophysiological and structural measures, might be able to distinguish between different neural circuit abnormalities in schizophrenia patients. ..."
17. Gamma genesis in the basolateral amygdala (Feng et al 2019)
Using in vitro and in vivo data we develop the first large-scale biophysically and anatomically realistic model of the basolateral amygdala nucleus (BL), which reproduces the dynamics of the in vivo local field potential (LFP). Significantly, it predicts that BL intrinsically generates the transient gamma oscillations observed in vivo. The model permitted exploration of the poorly understood synaptic mechanisms underlying gamma genesis in BL, and the model's ability to compute LFPs at arbitrary numbers of recording sites provided insights into the characteristics of the spatial properties of gamma bursts. Furthermore, we show how gamma synchronizes principal cells to overcome their low firing rates while simultaneously promoting competition, potentially impacting their afferent selectivity and efferent drive, and thus emotional behavior.
18. Gamma-beta alternation in the olfactory bulb (David, Fourcaud-Trocmé et al., 2015)
This model, a simplified olfactory bulb network with mitral and granule cells, proposes a framework for two regimes of oscillation in the olfactory bulb: 1 - a weak inhibition regime (with no granule spike) where the network oscillates in the gamma (40-90Hz) band 2 - a strong inhibition regime (with granule spikes) where the network oscillates in the beta (15-30Hz) band. Slow modulations of sensory and centrifugal inputs, phase shifted by a quarter of cycle, possibly combined with short term depression of the mitral to granule AMPA synapse, allows the network to alternate between the two regimes as observed in anesthetized animals.
19. Gap junction plasticity as a mechanism to regulate network-wide oscillations (Pernelle et al 2018)
"Oscillations of neural activity emerge when many neurons repeatedly activate together and are observed in many brain regions, particularly during sleep and attention. Their functional role is still debated, but could be associated with normal cognitive processes such as memory formation or with pathologies such as schizophrenia and autism. Powerful oscillations are also a hallmark of epileptic seizures. Therefore, we wondered what mechanism could regulate oscillations. A type of neuronal coupling, called gap junctions, has been shown to promote synchronization between inhibitory neurons. Computational models show that when gap junctions are strong, neurons synchronize together. Moreover recent investigations show that the gap junction coupling strength is not static but plastic and dependent on the firing properties of the neurons. Thus, we developed a model of gap junction plasticity in a network of inhibitory and excitatory neurons. We show that gap junction plasticity can maintain the right amount of oscillations to prevent pathologies from emerging. Finally, we show that gap junction plasticity serves an additional functional role and allows for efficient and robust information transfer."
20. Hippocampal CA1 NN with spontaneous theta, gamma: full scale & network clamp (Bezaire et al 2016)
This model is a full-scale, biologically constrained rodent hippocampal CA1 network model that includes 9 cells types (pyramidal cells and 8 interneurons) with realistic proportions of each and realistic connectivity between the cells. In addition, the model receives realistic numbers of afferents from artificial cells representing hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortical layer III. The model is fully scaleable and parallelized so that it can be run at small scale on a personal computer or large scale on a supercomputer. The model network exhibits spontaneous theta and gamma rhythms without any rhythmic input. The model network can be perturbed in a variety of ways to better study the mechanisms of CA1 network dynamics. Also see online code at http://bitbucket.org/mbezaire/ca1 and further information at http://mariannebezaire.com/models/ca1
21. Hippocampal CA3 network and circadian regulation (Stanley et al. 2013)
This model produces the hippocampal CA3 neural network model used in the paper below. It has two modes of operation, a default mode and a circadian mode. In the circadian mode, parameters are swept through a range of values. This model can be quite easily adapted to produce theta and gamma oscillations, as certain parameter sweeps will reveal (see Figures). BASH scripts interact with GENESIS 2.3 to implement parameter sweeps. The model contains four cell types derived from prior papers. CA3 pyramidal are derived from Traub et al (1991); Basket, stratum oriens (O-LM), and Medial Septal GABAergic (MSG) interneurons are taken from Hajos et al (2004).
22. Ih tunes oscillations in an In Silico CA3 model (Neymotin et al. 2013)
" ... We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of Ih. Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket Ih allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal Ih also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via Ih’s ability to set pyramidal excitability. ..."
23. Inhibition and glial-K+ interaction leads to diverse seizure transition modes (Ho & Truccolo 2016)
"How focal seizures initiate and evolve in human neocortex remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. Here, we use biophysical neuronal network models of neocortical patches to study how the interaction between inhibition and extracellular potassium ([K+]o) dynamics may contribute to different types of focal seizures. Three main types of propagated focal seizures observed in recent intracortical microelectrode recordings in humans were modelled ..."
24. Ketamine disrupts theta modulation of gamma in a computer model of hippocampus (Neymotin et al 2011)
"Abnormalities in oscillations have been suggested to play a role in schizophrenia. We studied theta-modulated gamma oscillations in a computer model of hippocampal CA3 in vivo with and without simulated application of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist and psychotomimetic. Networks of 1200 multi-compartment neurons (pyramidal, basket and oriens-lacunosum moleculare, OLM, cells) generated theta and gamma oscillations from intrinsic network dynamics: basket cells primarily generated gamma and amplified theta, while OLM cells strongly contributed to theta. ..."
25. Large-scale model of neocortical slice in vitro exhibiting persistent gamma (Tomsett et al. 2014)
This model contains 15 neuron populations (8 excitatory, 7 inhibitory) arranged into 4 cortical layers (layer 1 empty, layers 2/3 combined). It produces a persistent gamma oscillation driven by layer 2/3. It runs using the VERTEX simulator, which is written in Matlab and is available from http://www.vertexsimulator.org
26. Long time windows from theta modulated inhib. in entorhinal–hippo. loop (Cutsuridis & Poirazi 2015)
"A recent experimental study (Mizuseki et al., 2009) has shown that the temporal delays between population activities in successive entorhinal and hippocampal anatomical stages are longer (about 70–80 ms) than expected from axon conduction velocities and passive synaptic integration of feed-forward excitatory inputs. We investigate via computer simulations the mechanisms that give rise to such long temporal delays in the hippocampus structures. ... The model shows that the experimentally reported long temporal delays in the DG, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions are due to theta modulated somatic and axonic inhibition..."
27. MDD: the role of glutamate dysfunction on Cingulo-Frontal NN dynamics (Ramirez-Mahaluf et al 2017)
" ...Currently, no mechanistic framework describes how network dynamics, glutamate, and serotonin interact to explain MDD symptoms and treatments. Here, we built a biophysical computational model of 2 areas (vACC and dlPFC) that can switch between emotional and cognitive processing. (Major Depression Disease) MDD networks were simulated by slowing glutamate decay in vACC and demonstrated sustained vACC activation. ..."
28. Modulation of hippocampal rhythms by electric fields and network topology (Berzhanskaya et al. 2013)
“… Here we present experimental and computational evidence of the interplay among hippocampal synaptic circuitry, neuronal morphology, external electric fields, and network activity. Electrophysiological data are used to constrain and validate an anatomically and biophysically realistic model of area CA1 containing pyramidal cells and two interneuron types: dendritic- and perisomatic-targeting. We report two lines of results: addressing the network structure capable of generating theta-modulated gamma rhythms, and demonstrating electric field effects on those rhythms. First, theta-modulated gamma rhythms require specific inhibitory connectivity. … The second major finding is that subthreshold electric fields robustly alter the balance between different rhythms. …”
29. Multitarget pharmacology for Dystonia in M1 (Neymotin et al 2016)
" ... We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. ..."
30. Neural mass model based on single cell dynamics to model pathophysiology (Zandt et al 2014)
The model code as described in "A neural mass model based on single cell dynamics to model pathophysiology, Zandt et al. 2014, Journal of Computational Neuroscience" A Neural mass model (NMM) derived from single cell dynamics in a bottom up approach. Mean and standard deviation of the firing rates in the populations are calculated. The sigmoid is derived from the single cell FI-curve, allowing for easy implementation of pathological conditions. NMM is compared with a detailed spiking network model consisting of HH neurons. NMM code in Matlab. The network model is simulated using Norns (ModelDB # 154739)
31. Noise promotes independent control of gamma oscillations and grid firing (Solanka et al 2015)
"Neural computations underlying cognitive functions require calibration of the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections and are associated with modulation of gamma frequency oscillations in network activity. However, principles relating gamma oscillations, synaptic strength and circuit computations are unclear. We address this in attractor network models that account for grid firing and theta-nested gamma oscillations in the medial entorhinal cortex. ..."
32. Olfactory Bulb mitral-granule network generates beta oscillations (Osinski & Kay 2016)
This model of the dendrodendritic mitral-granule synaptic network generates gamma and beta oscillations as a function of the granule cell excitability, which is represented by the granule cell resting membrane potential.
33. PIR gamma oscillations in network of resonators (Tikidji-Hamburyan et al. 2015)
" ... The coupled oscillator model implemented with Wang–Buzsaki model neurons is not sufficiently robust to heterogeneity in excitatory drive, and therefore intrinsic frequency, to account for in vitro models of ING. Similarly, in a tightly synchronized regime, the stochastic population oscillator model is often characterized by sparse firing, whereas interneurons both in vivo and in vitro do not fire sparsely during gamma,but rather on average every other cycle. We substituted so-called resonator neural models, which exhibit class 2 excitability and postinhibitory rebound (PIR), for the integrators that are typically used. This results in much greater robustness to heterogeneity that actually increases as the average participation in spikes per cycle approximates physiological levels. Moreover, dynamic clamp experiments that show autapse-induced firing in entorhinal cortical interneurons support the idea that PIR can serve as a network gamma mechanism. ..."
34. Place and grid cells in a loop (Rennó-Costa & Tort 2017)
This model implements a loop circuit between place and grid cells. The model was used to explain place cell remapping and grid cell realignment. Grid cell model as a continuous attractor network. Place cells have recurrent attractor network. Rate models implemented with E%-MAX winner-take-all network dynamics, with gamma cycle time-step.
35. Prosthetic electrostimulation for information flow repair in a neocortical simulation (Kerr 2012)
This model is an extension of a model (<a href="http://senselab.med.yale.edu/ModelDB/ShowModel.asp?model=138379">138379</a>) recently published in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience. This model consists of 4700 event-driven, rule-based neurons, wired according to anatomical data, and driven by both white-noise synaptic inputs and a sensory signal recorded from a rat thalamus. Its purpose is to explore the effects of cortical damage, along with the repair of this damage via a neuroprosthesis.
36. Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
37. Subiculum network model with dynamic chloride/potassium homeostasis (Buchin et al 2016)
This is the code implementing the single neuron and spiking neural network dynamics. The network has the dynamic ion concentrations of extracellular potassium and intracellular chloride. The code contains multiple parameter variations to study various mechanisms of the neural excitability in the context of chloride homeostasis.
38. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
39. Visual physiology of the layer 4 cortical circuit in silico (Arkhipov et al 2018)
"Despite advances in experimental techniques and accumulation of large datasets concerning the composition and properties of the cortex, quantitative modeling of cortical circuits under in-vivo-like conditions remains challenging. Here we report and publicly release a biophysically detailed circuit model of layer 4 in the mouse primary visual cortex, receiving thalamo- cortical visual inputs. The 45,000-neuron model was subjected to a battery of visual stimuli, and results were compared to published work and new in vivo experiments. ..."

Re-display model names without descriptions