Circuits that contain the Current : I K,leak

(Contributes to neuronal resting "leak"conductance)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. A Moth MGC Model-A HH network with quantitative rate reduction (Buckley & Nowotny 2011)
We provide the model used in Buckley & Nowotny (2011). It consists of a network of Hodgkin Huxley neurons coupled by slow GABA_B synapses which is run alongside a quantitative reduction described in the associated paper.
2. A unified thalamic model of multiple distinct oscillations (Li, Henriquez and Fröhlich 2017)
We present a unified model of the thalamus that is capable of independently generating multiple distinct oscillations (delta, spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations) under different levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) modulation corresponding to different physiological conditions (deep sleep, light sleep, relaxed wakefulness and attention). The model also shows that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is state-dependent.
3. CA1 network model for place cell dynamics (Turi et al 2019)
Biophysical model of CA1 hippocampal region. The model simulates place cells/fields and explores the place cell dynamics as function of VIP+ interneurons.
4. Changes of ionic concentrations during seizure transitions (Gentiletti et al. 2016)
"... In order to investigate the respective roles of synaptic interactions and nonsynaptic mechanisms in seizure transitions, we developed a computational model of hippocampal cells, involving the extracellular space, realistic dynamics of Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl - ions, glial uptake and extracellular diffusion mechanisms. We show that the network behavior with fixed ionic concentrations may be quite different from the neurons’ behavior when more detailed modeling of ionic dynamics is included. In particular, we show that in the extended model strong discharge of inhibitory interneurons may result in long lasting accumulation of extracellular K+, which sustains the depolarization of the principal cells and causes their pathological discharges. ..."
5. Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
6. Dentate gyrus network model pattern separation and granule cell scaling in epilepsy (Yim et al 2015)
The dentate gyrus (DG) is thought to enable efficient hippocampal memory acquisition via pattern separation. With patterns defined as spatiotemporally distributed action potential sequences, the principal DG output neurons (granule cells, GCs), presumably sparsen and separate similar input patterns from the perforant path (PP). In electrophysiological experiments, we have demonstrated that during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), GCs downscale their excitability by transcriptional upregulation of ‘leak’ channels. Here we studied whether this cell type-specific intrinsic plasticity is in a position to homeostatically adjust DG network function. We modified an established conductance-based computer model of the DG network such that it realizes a spatiotemporal pattern separation task, and quantified its performance with and without the experimentally constrained leaky GC phenotype. ...
7. Dynamic dopamine modulation in the basal ganglia: Learning in Parkinson (Frank et al 2004,2005)
See README file for all info on how to run models under different tasks and simulated Parkinson's and medication conditions.
8. ELL pyramidal neuron (Simmonds and Chacron 2014)
network model of ELL pyramidal neurons receiving both feedforward and feedback inputs
9. Epilepsy may be caused by very small functional changes in ion channels (Thomas et al. 2009)
We used a previously published model of the dentate gyrus with varying degrees of mossy fibre sprouting.We preformed a sensitivity analysis where we systematically varied individual properties of ion channels. The results predict that genetic variations in the properties of sodium channels are likely to have the biggest impact on network excitability. Furthermore, these changes may be as small as 1mV, which is currently undetectable using standard experimental practices.
10. Grid cell oscillatory interference with noisy network oscillators (Zilli and Hasselmo 2010)
To examine whether an oscillatory interference model of grid cell activity could work if the oscillators were noisy neurons, we implemented these simulations. Here the oscillators are networks (either synaptically- or gap-junction--coupled) of one or more noisy neurons (either Izhikevich's simple model or a Hodgkin-Huxley--type biophysical model) which drive a postsynaptic cell (which may be integrate-and-fire, resonate-and-fire, or the simple model) which should fire spatially as a grid cell if the simulation is successful.
11. Hippocampal CA1 NN with spontaneous theta, gamma: full scale & network clamp (Bezaire et al 2016)
This model is a full-scale, biologically constrained rodent hippocampal CA1 network model that includes 9 cells types (pyramidal cells and 8 interneurons) with realistic proportions of each and realistic connectivity between the cells. In addition, the model receives realistic numbers of afferents from artificial cells representing hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortical layer III. The model is fully scaleable and parallelized so that it can be run at small scale on a personal computer or large scale on a supercomputer. The model network exhibits spontaneous theta and gamma rhythms without any rhythmic input. The model network can be perturbed in a variety of ways to better study the mechanisms of CA1 network dynamics. Also see online code at http://bitbucket.org/mbezaire/ca1 and further information at http://mariannebezaire.com/models/ca1
12. Ih tunes oscillations in an In Silico CA3 model (Neymotin et al. 2013)
" ... We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of Ih. Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket Ih allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal Ih also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via Ih’s ability to set pyramidal excitability. ..."
13. Knox implementation of Destexhe 1998 spike and wave oscillation model (Knox et al 2018)
" ...The aim of this study was to use an established thalamocortical computer model to determine how T-type calcium channels work in concert with cortical excitability to contribute to pathogenesis and treatment response in CAE. METHODS: The model is comprised of cortical pyramidal, cortical inhibitory, thalamocortical relay, and thalamic reticular single-compartment neurons, implemented with Hodgkin-Huxley model ion channels and connected by AMPA, GABAA , and GABAB synapses. Network behavior was simulated for different combinations of T-type calcium channel conductance, inactivation time, steady state activation/inactivation shift, and cortical GABAA conductance. RESULTS: Decreasing cortical GABAA conductance and increasing T-type calcium channel conductance converted spindle to spike and wave oscillations; smaller changes were required if both were changed in concert. In contrast, left shift of steady state voltage activation/inactivation did not lead to spike and wave oscillations, whereas right shift reduced network propensity for oscillations of any type...."
14. Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
15. Model of eupnea and sigh generation in respiratory network (Toporikova et al 2015)
Based on recent in vitro data obtained in the mouse embryo, we have built a computational model consisting of two compartments, interconnected through appropriate synapses. One compartment generates sighs and the other produces eupneic bursts. The model reproduces basic features of simultaneous sigh and eupnea generation (two types of bursts differing in terms of shape, amplitude, and frequency of occurrence) and mimics the effect of blocking glycinergic synapses
16. Na channel mutations in the dentate gyrus (Thomas et al. 2009)
These are source files to generate the data in Figure 6 from "Mossy fiber sprouting interacts with sodium channel mutations to increase dentate gyrus excitability" Thomas EA, Reid CA, Petrou S, Epilepsia (2009)
17. Network model with neocortical architecture (Anderson et al 2007,2012; Azhar et al 2012)
Architecturally realistic neocortical model using seven classes of excitatory and inhibitory single compartment Hodgkin-Huxley cells. This is an addendum to ModelDB Accession # 98902, Studies of stimulus parameters for seizure disruption (Anderson et al. 2007). Wiring is adapted from the minicolumn hypothesis and incorporates visual and neocortical wiring data. Simulation demonstrates spontaneous bursting onset and cessation. This activity can be induced by random fluctuations in the surrounding background input.
18. Olfactory Bulb Network (Davison et al 2003)
A biologically-detailed model of the mammalian olfactory bulb, incorporating the mitral and granule cells and the dendrodendritic synapses between them. The results of simulation experiments with electrical stimulation agree closely in most details with published experimental data. The model predicts that the time course of dendrodendritic inhibition is dependent on the network connectivity as well as on the intrinsic parameters of the synapses. In response to simulated odor stimulation, strongly activated mitral cells tend to suppress neighboring cells, the mitral cells readily synchronize their firing, and increasing the stimulus intensity increases the degree of synchronization. For more details, see the reference below.
19. Parametric computation and persistent gamma in a cortical model (Chambers et al. 2012)
Using the Traub et al (2005) model of the cortex we determined how 33 synaptic strength parameters control gamma oscillations. We used fractional factorial design to reduce the number of runs required to 4096. We found an expected multiplicative interaction between parameters.
20. Persistent synchronized bursting activity in cortical tissues (Golomb et al 2005)
The program simulates a one-dimensional model of a cortical tissue with excitatory and inhibitory populations.
21. Single compartment Dorsal Lateral Medium Spiny Neuron w/ NMDA and AMPA (Biddell and Johnson 2013)
A biophysical single compartment model of the dorsal lateral striatum medium spiny neuron is presented here. The model is an implementation then adaptation of a previously described model (Mahon et al. 2002). The model has been adapted to include NMDA and AMPA receptor models that have been fit to dorsal lateral striatal neurons. The receptor models allow for excitation by other neuron models.
22. Sleep-wake transitions in corticothalamic system (Bazhenov et al 2002)
The authors investigate the transition between sleep and awake states with intracellular recordings in cats and computational models. The model describes many essential features of slow wave sleep and activated states as well as the transition between them.
23. Structure-dynamics relationships in bursting neuronal networks revealed (Mäki-Marttunen et al. 2013)
This entry includes tools for generating and analyzing network structure, and for running the neuronal network simulations on them.
24. Studies of stimulus parameters for seizure disruption using NN simulations (Anderson et al. 2007)
Architecturally realistic neocortical model using seven classes of excitatory and inhibitory single compartment Hodgkin-Huxley cells. Wiring is adapted to minicolumn hypothesis and incorporates visual and neocortical data. Simulation demonstrates spontaneous bursting onset and cessation, and activity can be altered with external electric field.
25. Subiculum network model with dynamic chloride/potassium homeostasis (Buchin et al 2016)
This is the code implementing the single neuron and spiking neural network dynamics. The network has the dynamic ion concentrations of extracellular potassium and intracellular chloride. The code contains multiple parameter variations to study various mechanisms of the neural excitability in the context of chloride homeostasis.
26. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
27. Thalamocortical and Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1996)
NEURON model of oscillations in networks of thalamocortical and thalamic reticular neurons in the ferret. (more applications for a model quantitatively identical to previous DLGN model; updated for NEURON v4 and above)

Re-display model names without descriptions