Circuits that contain the Current : I h

(Inward rectifier; "Queer"; activated by hyperpolarization/mixed cation current)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. A multilayer cortical model to study seizure propagation across microdomains (Basu et al. 2015)
A realistic neural network was used to simulate a region of neocortex to obtain extracellular LFPs from ‘virtual micro-electrodes’ and produce test data for comparison with multisite microelectrode recordings. A model was implemented in the GENESIS neurosimulator. A simulated region of cortex was represented by layers 2/3, 5/6 (interneurons and pyramidal cells) and layer 4 stelate cells, spaced at 25 µm in each horizontal direction. Pyramidal cells received AMPA and NMDA inputs from neighboring cells at the basal and apical dendrites. The LFP data was generated by simulating 16-site electrode array with the help of ‘efield’ objects arranged at the predetermined positions with respect to the surface of the simulated network. The LFP for the model is derived from a weighted average of the current sources summed over all cellular compartments. Cell models were taken from from Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol 93(4):2194-232.
2. A single column thalamocortical network model (Traub et al 2005)
To better understand population phenomena in thalamocortical neuronal ensembles, we have constructed a preliminary network model with 3,560 multicompartment neurons (containing soma, branching dendrites, and a portion of axon). Types of neurons included superficial pyramids (with regular spiking [RS] and fast rhythmic bursting [FRB] firing behaviors); RS spiny stellates; fast spiking (FS) interneurons, with basket-type and axoaxonic types of connectivity, and located in superficial and deep cortical layers; low threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, that contacted principal cell dendrites; deep pyramids, that could have RS or intrinsic bursting (IB) firing behaviors, and endowed either with non-tufted apical dendrites or with long tufted apical dendrites; thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells; and nucleus reticularis (nRT) cells. To the extent possible, both electrophysiology and synaptic connectivity were based on published data, although many arbitrary choices were necessary.
3. A two-layer biophysical olfactory bulb model of cholinergic neuromodulation (Li and Cleland 2013)
This is a two-layer biophysical olfactory bulb (OB) network model to study cholinergic neuromodulation. Simulations show that nicotinic receptor activation sharpens mitral cell receptive field, while muscarinic receptor activation enhances network synchrony and gamma oscillations. This general model suggests that the roles of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in OB are both distinct and complementary to one another, together regulating the effects of ascending cholinergic inputs on olfactory bulb transformations.
4. A unified thalamic model of multiple distinct oscillations (Li, Henriquez and Fröhlich 2017)
We present a unified model of the thalamus that is capable of independently generating multiple distinct oscillations (delta, spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations) under different levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) modulation corresponding to different physiological conditions (deep sleep, light sleep, relaxed wakefulness and attention). The model also shows that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is state-dependent.
5. Activity constraints on stable neuronal or network parameters (Olypher and Calabrese 2007)
"In this study, we developed a general description of parameter combinations for which specified characteristics of neuronal or network activity are constant. Our approach is based on the implicit function theorem and is applicable to activity characteristics that smoothly depend on parameters. Such smoothness is often intrinsic to neuronal systems when they are in stable functional states. The conclusions about how parameters compensate each other, developed in this study, can thus be used even without regard to the specific mathematical model describing a particular neuron or neuronal network. ..."
6. Alpha rhythm in vitro visual cortex (Traub et al 2020)
The paper describes an experimental model of the alpha rhythm generated by layer 4 pyramidal neurons in a visual cortex slice. The simulation model is derived from that of Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol, developed for thalamocortical oscillations.
7. Axonal gap junctions produce fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells (Traub et al. 2008)
Examines how electrical coupling between proximal axons produces fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Traub RD, Middleton SJ, Knopfel T, Whittington MA (2008) Model of very fast (>75 Hz) network oscillations generated by electrical coupling between the proximal axons of cerebellar Purkinje cells. European Journal of Neuroscience.
8. Biophysically realistic neural modeling of the MEG mu rhythm (Jones et al. 2009)
"Variations in cortical oscillations in the alpha (7–14 Hz) and beta (15–29 Hz) range have been correlated with attention, working memory, and stimulus detection. The mu rhythm recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a prominent oscillation generated by Rolandic cortex containing alpha and beta bands. Despite its prominence, the neural mechanisms regulating mu are unknown. We characterized the ongoing MEG mu rhythm from a localized source in the finger representation of primary somatosensory (SI) cortex. Subjects showed variation in the relative expression of mu-alpha or mu-beta, which were nonoverlapping for roughly 50% of their respective durations on single trials. To delineate the origins of this rhythm, a biophysically principled computational neural model of SI was developed, with distinct laminae, inhibitory and excitatory neurons, and feedforward (FF, representative of lemniscal thalamic drive) and feedback (FB, representative of higher-order cortical drive or input from nonlemniscal thalamic nuclei) inputs defined by the laminar location of their postsynaptic effects. ..."
9. Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
10. CA1 network model for place cell dynamics (Turi et al 2019)
Biophysical model of CA1 hippocampal region. The model simulates place cells/fields and explores the place cell dynamics as function of VIP+ interneurons.
11. CA1 network model: interneuron contributions to epileptic deficits (Shuman et al 2019)
Temporal lobe epilepsy causes significant cognitive deficits in both humans and rodents, yet the specific circuit mechanisms underlying these deficits remain unknown. There are profound and selective interneuron death and axonal reorganization within the hippocampus of both humans and animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. To assess the specific contribution of these mechanisms on spatial coding, we developed a biophysically constrained network model of the CA1 region that consists of different subtypes of interneurons. More specifically, our network consists of 150 cells, 130 excitatory pyramidal cells and 20 interneurons (Fig. 1A). To simulate place cell formation in the network model, we generated grid cell and place cell inputs from the Entorhinal Cortex (ECLIII) and CA3 regions, respectively, activated in a realistic manner as observed when an animal transverses a linear track. Realistic place fields emerged in a subpopulation of pyramidal cells (40-50%), in which similar EC and CA3 grid cell inputs converged onto distal/proximal apical and basal dendrites. The tuning properties of these cells are very similar to the ones observed experimentally in awake, behaving animals To examine the role of interneuron death and axonal reorganization in the formation and/or tuning properties of place fields we selectively varied the contribution of each interneuron type and desynchronized the two excitatory inputs. We found that desynchronized inputs were critical in reproducing the experimental data, namely the profound reduction in place cell numbers, stability and information content. These results demonstrate that the desynchronized firing of hippocampal neuronal populations contributes to poor spatial processing in epileptic mice, during behavior. Given the lack of experimental data on the selective contributions of interneuron death and axonal reorganization in spatial memory, our model findings predict the mechanistic effects of these alterations at the cellular and network levels.
12. Cerebellar granular layer (Maex and De Schutter 1998)
Circuit model of the granular layer representing a one-dimensional array of single-compartmental granule cells (grcs) and Golgi cells (Gocs). This paper examines the effects of feedback inhibition (grc -> Goc -> grc) versus feedforward inhibition (mossy fibre -> Goc -> grc) on synchronization and oscillatory behaviour.
13. Collection of simulated data from a thalamocortical network model (Glabska, Chintaluri, Wojcik 2017)
"A major challenge in experimental data analysis is the validation of analytical methods in a fully controlled scenario where the justification of the interpretation can be made directly and not just by plausibility. ... One solution is to use simulations of realistic models to generate ground truth data. In neuroscience, creating such data requires plausible models of neural activity, access to high performance computers, expertise and time to prepare and run the simulations, and to process the output. To facilitate such validation tests of analytical methods we provide rich data sets including intracellular voltage traces, transmembrane currents, morphologies, and spike times. ... The data were generated using the largest publicly available multicompartmental model of thalamocortical network (Traub et al. 2005), with activity evoked by different thalamic stimuli."
14. Competing oscillator 5-cell circuit and Parameterscape plotting (Gutierrez et al. 2013)
Our 5-cell model consists of competing fast and slow oscillators connected to a hub neuron with electrical and inhibitory synapses. Motivated by the Stomatogastric Ganglion (STG) circuit in the crab, we explored the patterns of coordination in the network as a function of the electrical coupling and inhibitory synapse strengths with the help of a novel visualization method that we call the "Parameterscape." The code submitted here will allow you to run circuit simulations and to produce a Parameterscape with the results.
15. Computational analysis of NN activity and spatial reach of sharp wave-ripples (Canakci et al 2017)
Network oscillations of different frequencies, durations and amplitudes are hypothesized to coordinate information processing and transfer across brain areas. Among these oscillations, hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs) are one of the most prominent. SPW-Rs occurring in the hippocampus are suggested to play essential roles in memory consolidation as well as information transfer to the neocortex. To-date, most of the knowledge about SPW-Rs comes from experimental studies averaging responses from neuronal populations monitored by conventional microelectrodes. In this work, we investigate spatiotemporal characteristics of SPW-Rs and how microelectrode size and distance influence SPW-R recordings using a biophysical model of hippocampus. We also explore contributions from neuronal spikes and synaptic potentials to SPW-Rs based on two different types of network activity. Our study suggests that neuronal spikes from pyramidal cells contribute significantly to ripples while high amplitude sharp waves mainly arise from synaptic activity. Our simulations on spatial reach of SPW-Rs show that the amplitudes of sharp waves and ripples exhibit a steep decrease with distance from the network and this effect is more prominent for smaller area electrodes. Furthermore, the amplitude of the signal decreases strongly with increasing electrode surface area as a result of averaging. The relative decrease is more pronounced when the recording electrode is closer to the source of the activity. Through simulations of field potentials across a high-density microelectrode array, we demonstrate the importance of finding the ideal spatial resolution for capturing SPW-Rs with great sensitivity. Our work provides insights on contributions from spikes and synaptic potentials to SPW-Rs and describes the effect of measurement configuration on LFPs to guide experimental studies towards improved SPW-R recordings.
16. Current Dipole in Laminar Neocortex (Lee et al. 2013)
Laminar neocortical model in NEURON/Python, adapted from Jones et al 2009. https://bitbucket.org/jonescompneurolab/corticaldipole
17. Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
18. Dentate gyrus network model (Tejada et al 2014)
" ... Here we adapted an existing computational model of the dentate gyrus (J Neurophysiol 93: 437-453, 2005) by replacing the reduced granule cell models with morphologically detailed models coming from (3D) reconstructions of mature cells. ... Different fractions of the mature granule cell models were replaced by morphologically reconstructed models of newborn dentate granule cells from animals with PILO-induced Status Epilepticus, which have apical dendritic alterations and spine loss, and control animals, which do not have these alterations. This complex arrangement of cells and processes allowed us to study the combined effect of mossy fiber sprouting, altered apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells on the excitability of the dentate gyrus model. Our simulations suggest that alterations in the apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells have opposing effects on the excitability of the dentate gyrus after Status Epilepticus. Apical dendritic alterations potentiate the increase of excitability provoked by mossy fiber sprouting while spine loss curtails this increase. "
19. Dynamic cortical interlaminar interactions (Carracedo et al. 2013)
"... Here we demonstrate the mechanism underlying a purely neocortical delta rhythm generator and show a remarkable laminar, cell subtype and local subcircuit delineation between delta and nested theta rhythms. We show that spike timing during delta-nested theta rhythms controls an iterative, reciprocal interaction between deep and superficial cortical layers resembling the unsupervised learning processes proposed for laminar neural networks by Hinton and colleagues ... and mimicking the alternating cortical dynamics of sensory and memory processing during wakefulness."
20. Effects of increasing CREB on storage and recall processes in a CA1 network (Bianchi et al. 2014)
Several recent results suggest that boosting the CREB pathway improves hippocampal-dependent memory in healthy rodents and restores this type of memory in an AD mouse model. However, not much is known about how CREB-dependent neuronal alterations in synaptic strength, excitability and LTP can boost memory formation in the complex architecture of a neuronal network. Using a model of a CA1 microcircuit, we investigate whether hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron properties altered by increasing CREB activity may contribute to improve memory storage and recall. With a set of patterns presented to a network, we find that the pattern recall quality under AD-like conditions is significantly better when boosting CREB function with respect to control. The results are robust and consistent upon increasing the synaptic damage expected by AD progression, supporting the idea that the use of CREB-based therapies could provide a new approach to treat AD.
21. Electrodecrements in in vitro model of infantile spasms (Traub et al 2020)
The code is an extension of the thalamocortical model of Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol. It is here applied to an in vitro model of the electrodecremental response seen in the EEG of children with infantile spasms (West syndrome)
22. Engaging distinct oscillatory neocortical circuits (Vierling-Claassen et al. 2010)
"Selective optogenetic drive of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons (INs) leads to enhanced local field potential (LFP) power across the traditional “gamma” frequency band (20–80 Hz; Cardin et al., 2009). In contrast, drive to regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal cells enhances power at lower frequencies, with a peak at 8 Hz. The first result is consistent with previous computational studies emphasizing the role of FS and the time constant of GABAA synaptic inhibition in gamma rhythmicity. However, the same theoretical models do not typically predict low-frequency LFP enhancement with RS drive. To develop hypotheses as to how the same network can support these contrasting behaviors, we constructed a biophysically principled network model of primary somatosensory neocortex containing FS, RS, and low-threshold spiking (LTS) INs. ..."
23. Fast oscillations in inhibitory networks (Maex, De Schutter 2003)
We observed a new phenomenon of resonant synchronization in computer-simulated networks of inhibitory neurons in which the synaptic current has a delayed onset, reflecting finite spike propagation and synaptic transmission times. At the resonant level of network excitation, all neurons fire synchronously and rhythmically with a period approximately four times the mean delay of the onset of the inhibitory synaptic current. ... By varying the axonal delay of the inhibitory connections, networks with a realistic synaptic kinetics can be tuned to frequencies from 40 to >200 Hz. ... We conclude that the delay of the synaptic current is the primary parameter controlling the oscillation frequency of inhibitory networks and propose that delay-induced synchronization is a mechanism for fast brain rhythms that depend on intact inhibitory synaptic transmission.
24. Gamma genesis in the basolateral amygdala (Feng et al 2019)
Using in vitro and in vivo data we develop the first large-scale biophysically and anatomically realistic model of the basolateral amygdala nucleus (BL), which reproduces the dynamics of the in vivo local field potential (LFP). Significantly, it predicts that BL intrinsically generates the transient gamma oscillations observed in vivo. The model permitted exploration of the poorly understood synaptic mechanisms underlying gamma genesis in BL, and the model's ability to compute LFPs at arbitrary numbers of recording sites provided insights into the characteristics of the spatial properties of gamma bursts. Furthermore, we show how gamma synchronizes principal cells to overcome their low firing rates while simultaneously promoting competition, potentially impacting their afferent selectivity and efferent drive, and thus emotional behavior.
25. Grid cell oscillatory interference with noisy network oscillators (Zilli and Hasselmo 2010)
To examine whether an oscillatory interference model of grid cell activity could work if the oscillators were noisy neurons, we implemented these simulations. Here the oscillators are networks (either synaptically- or gap-junction--coupled) of one or more noisy neurons (either Izhikevich's simple model or a Hodgkin-Huxley--type biophysical model) which drive a postsynaptic cell (which may be integrate-and-fire, resonate-and-fire, or the simple model) which should fire spatially as a grid cell if the simulation is successful.
26. H-currents effect on the fluctuation of gamma/beta oscillations (Avella-Gonzalez et al., 2015)
This model was designed to study the impact of H-currents on the dynamics of cortical oscillations, and in paticular on the occurrence of high and low amplitude episodes (HAE, LAE) in network oscillations. The H-current is a slow, hyperpolarization-activated, depolarizing current that contributes to neuronal resonance and membrane potential. We characterized amplitude fluctuations in network oscillations by measuring the average durations of HAEs and LAEs, and explored how these were modulated by trains of external spikes, both in the presence and absence of H-channels. We looked at HAE duration, the frequency and power of network oscillations, and the effect of H-channels on the temporal voltage profile in single cells. We found that H-currents increased the oscillation frequency and, in combination with external spikes, representing input from areas outside the network, strongly decreased the synchrony of firing. As a consequence, the oscillation power and the duration of episodes during which the network exhibited high-amplitude oscillations were greatly reduced in the presence of H-channels.
27. Half-center oscillator database of leech heart interneuron model (Doloc-Mihu & Calabrese 2011)
We have created a database (HCO-db) of instances of a half-center oscillator computational model [Hill et al., 2001] for analyzing how neuronal parameters influence network activity. We systematically explored the parameter space of about 10.4 million simulated HCO instances and corresponding isolated neuron model simulations obtained by varying a set of selected parameters (maximal conductance of intrinsic and synaptic currents) in all combinations using a brute-force approach. We classified these HCO instances by their activity characteristics into identifiable groups. We built an efficient relational database table (HCO-db) with the resulting instances characteristics.
28. High frequency oscillations in a hippocampal computational model (Stacey et al. 2009)
"... Using a physiological computer model of hippocampus, we investigate random synaptic activity (noise) as a potential initiator of HFOs (high-frequency oscillations). We explore parameters necessary to produce these oscillations and quantify the response using the tools of stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR). ... Our results show that, under normal coupling conditions, synaptic noise was able to produce gamma (30–100 Hz) frequency oscillations. Synaptic noise generated HFOs in the ripple range (100–200 Hz) when the network had parameters similar to pathological findings in epilepsy: increased gap junctions or recurrent synaptic connections, loss of inhibitory interneurons such as basket cells, and increased synaptic noise. ... We propose that increased synaptic noise and physiological coupling mechanisms are sufficient to generate gamma oscillations and that pathologic changes in noise and coupling similar to those in epilepsy can produce abnormal ripples."
29. Hippocampal CA1 NN with spontaneous theta, gamma: full scale & network clamp (Bezaire et al 2016)
This model is a full-scale, biologically constrained rodent hippocampal CA1 network model that includes 9 cells types (pyramidal cells and 8 interneurons) with realistic proportions of each and realistic connectivity between the cells. In addition, the model receives realistic numbers of afferents from artificial cells representing hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortical layer III. The model is fully scaleable and parallelized so that it can be run at small scale on a personal computer or large scale on a supercomputer. The model network exhibits spontaneous theta and gamma rhythms without any rhythmic input. The model network can be perturbed in a variety of ways to better study the mechanisms of CA1 network dynamics. Also see online code at http://bitbucket.org/mbezaire/ca1 and further information at http://mariannebezaire.com/models/ca1
30. Hippocampal CA3 network and circadian regulation (Stanley et al. 2013)
This model produces the hippocampal CA3 neural network model used in the paper below. It has two modes of operation, a default mode and a circadian mode. In the circadian mode, parameters are swept through a range of values. This model can be quite easily adapted to produce theta and gamma oscillations, as certain parameter sweeps will reveal (see Figures). BASH scripts interact with GENESIS 2.3 to implement parameter sweeps. The model contains four cell types derived from prior papers. CA3 pyramidal are derived from Traub et al (1991); Basket, stratum oriens (O-LM), and Medial Septal GABAergic (MSG) interneurons are taken from Hajos et al (2004).
31. Ih tunes oscillations in an In Silico CA3 model (Neymotin et al. 2013)
" ... We investigated oscillatory control using a multiscale computer model of hippocampal CA3, where each cell class (pyramidal, basket, and oriens-lacunosum moleculare cells), contained type-appropriate isoforms of Ih. Our model demonstrated that modulation of pyramidal and basket Ih allows tuning theta and gamma oscillation frequency and amplitude. Pyramidal Ih also controlled cross-frequency coupling (CFC) and allowed shifting gamma generation towards particular phases of the theta cycle, effected via Ih’s ability to set pyramidal excitability. ..."
32. In silico hippocampal modeling for multi-target pharmacotherapy in schizophrenia (Sherif et al 2020)
"Using a hippocampal CA3 computer model with 1200 neurons, we examined the effects of alterations in NMDAR, HCN (Ih current), and GABAAR on information flow (measured with normalized transfer entropy), and in gamma activity in local field potential (LFP). We found that altering NMDARs, GABAAR, Ih, individually or in combination, modified information flow in an inverted-U shape manner, with information flow reduced at low and high levels of these parameters. Theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling also had an inverted-U shape relationship with NMDAR augmentation. The strong information flow was associated with an intermediate level of synchrony, seen as an intermediate level of gamma activity in the LFP, and an intermediate level of pyramidal cell excitability"
33. Knox implementation of Destexhe 1998 spike and wave oscillation model (Knox et al 2018)
" ...The aim of this study was to use an established thalamocortical computer model to determine how T-type calcium channels work in concert with cortical excitability to contribute to pathogenesis and treatment response in CAE. METHODS: The model is comprised of cortical pyramidal, cortical inhibitory, thalamocortical relay, and thalamic reticular single-compartment neurons, implemented with Hodgkin-Huxley model ion channels and connected by AMPA, GABAA , and GABAB synapses. Network behavior was simulated for different combinations of T-type calcium channel conductance, inactivation time, steady state activation/inactivation shift, and cortical GABAA conductance. RESULTS: Decreasing cortical GABAA conductance and increasing T-type calcium channel conductance converted spindle to spike and wave oscillations; smaller changes were required if both were changed in concert. In contrast, left shift of steady state voltage activation/inactivation did not lead to spike and wave oscillations, whereas right shift reduced network propensity for oscillations of any type...."
34. Leech heart interneuron network model (Hill et al 2001, 2002)
We have created a computational model of the timing network that paces the heartbeat of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis. In the intact nerve cord, segmental oscillators are mutually entrained to the same cycle period. Although experiments have shown that the segmental oscillators are coupled by inhibitory coordinating interneurons, the underlying mechanisms of intersegmental coordination have not yet been elucidated. To help understand this coordination, we have created a simple computational model with two variants: symmetric and asymmetric. See references for more details. Biologically realistic network models with two, six, and eight cells and a tutorial are available at the links to Calabrese's web site below.
35. Long time windows from theta modulated inhib. in entorhinal–hippo. loop (Cutsuridis & Poirazi 2015)
"A recent experimental study (Mizuseki et al., 2009) has shown that the temporal delays between population activities in successive entorhinal and hippocampal anatomical stages are longer (about 70–80 ms) than expected from axon conduction velocities and passive synaptic integration of feed-forward excitatory inputs. We investigate via computer simulations the mechanisms that give rise to such long temporal delays in the hippocampus structures. ... The model shows that the experimentally reported long temporal delays in the DG, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions are due to theta modulated somatic and axonic inhibition..."
36. Microcircuits of L5 thick tufted pyramidal cells (Hay & Segev 2015)
"... We simulated detailed conductance-based models of TTCs (Layer 5 thick tufted pyramidal cells) forming recurrent microcircuits that were interconnected as found experimentally; the network was embedded in a realistic background synaptic activity. ... Our findings indicate that dendritic nonlinearities are pivotal in controlling the gain and the computational functions of TTCs microcircuits, which serve as a dominant output source for the neocortex. "
37. Model of eupnea and sigh generation in respiratory network (Toporikova et al 2015)
Based on recent in vitro data obtained in the mouse embryo, we have built a computational model consisting of two compartments, interconnected through appropriate synapses. One compartment generates sighs and the other produces eupneic bursts. The model reproduces basic features of simultaneous sigh and eupnea generation (two types of bursts differing in terms of shape, amplitude, and frequency of occurrence) and mimics the effect of blocking glycinergic synapses
38. Model of the cerebellar granular network (Sudhakar et al 2017)
"The granular layer, which mainly consists of granule and Golgi cells, is the first stage of the cerebellar cortex and processes spatiotemporal information transmitted by mossy fiber inputs with a wide variety of firing patterns. To study its dynamics at multiple time scales in response to inputs approximating real spatiotemporal patterns, we constructed a large-scale 3D network model of the granular layer. ..."
39. Modelling platform of the cochlear nucleus and other auditory circuits (Manis & Compagnola 2018)
"Models of the auditory brainstem have been an invaluable tool for testing hypotheses about auditory information processing and for highlighting the most important gaps in the experimental literature. Due to the complexity of the auditory brainstem, and indeed most brain circuits, the dynamic behavior of the system may be difficult to predict without a detailed, biologically realistic computational model. Despite the sensitivity of models to their exact construction and parameters, most prior models of the cochlear nucleus have incorporated only a small subset of the known biological properties. This confounds the interpretation of modelling results and also limits the potential future uses of these models, which require a large effort to develop. To address these issues, we have developed a general purpose, bio-physically detailed model of the cochlear nucleus for use both in testing hypotheses about cochlear nucleus function and also as an input to models of downstream auditory nuclei. The model implements conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley representations of cells using a Python-based interface to the NEURON simulator. ..."
40. Modulation of septo-hippocampal theta activity by GABAA receptors (Hajos et al. 2004)
Theta frequency oscillation of the septo-hippocampal system has been considered as a prominent activity associated with cognitive function and affective processes. ... In the present experiments we applied a combination of computational and physiological techniques to explore the functional role of GABAA receptors in theta oscillation. ... In parallel to these experimental observations, a computational model has been constructed by implementing a septal GABA neuron model with a CA1 hippocampal model containing three types of neurons (including oriens and basket interneurons and pyramidal cells; latter modeled by multicompartmental techniques; for detailed model description with network parameters see online addendum: http://geza.kzoo.edu/theta). This connectivity made the network capable of simulating the responses of the septo-hippocampal circuitry to the modulation of GABAA transmission, and the presently described computational model proved suitable to reveal several aspects of pharmacological modulation of GABAA receptors. In addition, computational findings indicated different roles of distinctively located GABAA receptors in theta generation.
41. Multiscale model of excitotoxicity in PD (Muddapu and Chakravarthy 2020)
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc). Although the exact cause of cell death is not clear, the hypothesis that metabolic deficiency is a key factor has been gaining attention in recent years. In the present study, we investigate this hypothesis using a multi-scale computational model of the subsystem of the basal ganglia comprising Subthalamic Nucleus (STN), Globus Pallidus externa (GPe) and SNc. The proposed model is a multiscale model in that interactions among the three nuclei are simulated using more abstract Izhikevich neuron models, while the molecular pathways involved in cell death of SNc neurons are simulated in terms of detailed chemical kinetics. Simulation results obtained from the proposed model showed that energy deficiencies occurring at cellular and network levels could precipitate the excitotoxic loss of SNc neurons in PD. At the subcellular level, the models show how calcium elevation leads to apoptosis of SNc neurons. The therapeutic effects of several neuroprotective interventions are also simulated in the model. From neuroprotective studies, it was clear that glutamate inhibition and apoptotic signal blocker therapies were able to halt the progression of SNc cell loss when compared to other therapeutic interventions, which only slows down the progression of SNc cell loss.
42. Multitarget pharmacology for Dystonia in M1 (Neymotin et al 2016)
" ... We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. ..."
43. Network model of the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex (Maex, De Schutter 1998)
We computed the steady-state activity of a large-scale model of the granular layer of the rat cerebellum. Within a few tens of milliseconds after the start of random mossy fiber input, the populations of Golgi and granule cells became entrained in a single synchronous oscillation, the basic frequency of which ranged from 10 to 40 Hz depending on the average rate of firing in the mossy fiber population. ... The synchronous, rhythmic firing pattern was robust over a broad range of biologically realistic parameter values and to parameter randomization. Three conditions, however, made the oscillations more transient and could desynchronize the entire network in the end: a very low mossy fiber activity, a very dominant excitation of Golgi cells through mossy fiber synapses (rather than through parallel fiber synapses), and a tonic activation of granule cell GABAA receptors (with an almost complete absence of synaptically induced inhibitory postsynaptic currents). The model predicts that, under conditions of strong mossy fiber input to the cerebellum, Golgi cells do not only control the strength of parallel fiber activity but also the timing of the individual spikes. Provided that their parallel fiber synapses constitute an important source of excitation, Golgi cells fire rhythmically and synchronized with granule cells over large distances along the parallel fiber axis. See paper for more and details.
44. Network recruitment to coherent oscillations in a hippocampal model (Stacey et al. 2011)
"... Here we demonstrate, via a detailed computational model, a mechanism whereby physiological noise and coupling initiate oscillations and then recruit neighboring tissue, in a manner well described by a combination of Stochastic Resonance and Coherence Resonance. We develop a novel statistical method to quantify recruitment using several measures of network synchrony. This measurement demonstrates that oscillations spread via preexisting network connections such as interneuronal connections, recurrent synapses, and gap junctions, provided that neighboring cells also receive sufficient inputs in the form of random synaptic noise. ..."
45. Normal ripples, abnormal ripples, and fast ripples in a hippocampal model (Fink et al. 2015)
"...We use a computational model of hippocampus to investigate possible network mechanisms underpinning normal ripples, pathological ripples, and fast ripples. Our results unify several prior findings regarding HFO mechanisms, and also make several new predictions regarding abnormal HFOs. We show that HFOs are generic, emergent phenomena whose characteristics reflect a wide range of connectivity and network input. Although produced by different mechanisms, both normal and abnormal HFOs generate similar ripple frequencies, underscoring that peak frequency is unable to distinguish the two. Abnormal ripples are generic phenomena that arise when input to pyramidal cells overcomes network inhibition, resulting in high-frequency, uncoordinated firing. In addition, fast ripples transiently and sporadically arise from the precise conditions that produce abnormal ripples. Lastly, we show that such abnormal conditions do not require any specific network structure to produce coherent HFOs, as even completely asynchronous activity is capable of producing abnormal ripples and fast ripples in this manner. These results provide a generic, network-based explanation for the link between pathological ripples and fast ripples, and a unifying description for the entire spectrum from normal ripples to pathological fast ripples."
46. Olfactory bulb microcircuits model with dual-layer inhibition (Gilra & Bhalla 2015)
A detailed network model of the dual-layer dendro-dendritic inhibitory microcircuits in the rat olfactory bulb comprising compartmental mitral, granule and PG cells developed by Aditya Gilra, Upinder S. Bhalla (2015). All cell morphologies and network connections are in NeuroML v1.8.0. PG and granule cell channels and synapses are also in NeuroML v1.8.0. Mitral cell channels and synapses are in native python.
47. Pyramidal neuron, fast, regular, and irregular spiking interneurons (Konstantoudaki et al 2014)
This is a model network of prefrontal cortical microcircuit based primarily on rodent data. It includes 16 pyramidal model neurons, 2 fast spiking interneuron models, 1 regular spiking interneuron model and 1 irregular spiking interneuron model. The goal of the paper was to use this model network to determine the role of specific interneuron subtypes in persistent activity
48. Sensory-evoked responses of L5 pyramidal tract neurons (Egger et al 2020)
This is the L5 pyramidal tract neuron (L5PT) model from Egger, Narayanan et al., Neuron 2020. It allows investigating how synaptic inputs evoked by different sensory stimuli are integrated by the complex intrinsic properties of L5PTs. The model is constrained by anatomical measurements of the subcellular synaptic input patterns to L5PT neurons, in vivo measurements of sensory-evoked responses of different populations of neurons providing these synaptic inputs, and in vitro measurements constraining the biophysical properties of the soma, dendrites and axon (note: the biophysical model is based on the work by Hay et al., Plos Comp Biol 2011). The model files provided here allow performing simulations and analyses presented in Figures 3, 4 and 5.
49. Small world networks of Type I and Type II Excitable Neurons (Bogaard et al. 2009)
Implemented with NEURON 5.9, four model neurons with varying excitability properties affect the spatiotemporal patterning of small world networks of homogeneous and heterogeneous cell population.
50. Systematic integration of data into multi-scale models of mouse primary V1 (Billeh et al 2020)
"Highlights • Two network models of the mouse primary visual cortex are developed and released • One uses compartmental-neuron models and the other point-neuron models • The models recapitulate observations from in vivo experimental data • Simulations identify experimentally testable predictions about cortex circuitry"
51. Thalamic transformation of pallidal input (Hadipour-Niktarash 2006)
"In Parkinson’s disease, neurons of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) display the low-frequency tremor-related oscillations. These oscillatory activities are transmitted to the thalamic relay nuclei. Computer models of the interacting thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons were used to explore how the TC-RE network processes the low-frequency oscillations of the GPi neurons. ..."
52. Thalamocortical and Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1996)
NEURON model of oscillations in networks of thalamocortical and thalamic reticular neurons in the ferret. (more applications for a model quantitatively identical to previous DLGN model; updated for NEURON v4 and above)
53. Thalamocortical control of propofol phase-amplitude coupling (Soplata et al 2017)
"The anesthetic propofol elicits many different spectral properties on the EEG, including alpha oscillations (8-12 Hz), Slow Wave Oscillations (SWO, 0.1-1.5 Hz), and dose-dependent phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between alpha and SWO. Propofol is known to increase GABAA inhibition and decrease H-current strength, but how it generates these rhythms and their interactions is still unknown. To investigate both generation of the alpha rhythm and its PAC to SWO, we simulate a Hodgkin-Huxley network model of a hyperpolarized thalamus and corticothalamic inputs. ..."
54. The origin of different spike and wave-like events (Hall et al 2017)
Acute In vitro models have revealed a great deal of information about mechanisms underlying many types of epileptiform activity. However, few examples exist that shed light on spike and wave (SpW) patterns of pathological activity. SpW are seen in many epilepsy syndromes, both generalised and focal, and manifest across the entire age spectrum. They are heterogeneous in terms of their severity, symptom burden and apparent anatomical origin (thalamic, neocortical or both), but any relationship between this heterogeneity and underlying pathology remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that physiological delta frequency rhythms act as an effective substrate to permit modelling of SpW of cortical origin and may help to address this issue. ..."
55. Unbalanced peptidergic inhibition in superficial cortex underlies seizure activity (Hall et al 2015)
" ...Loss of tonic neuromodulatory excitation, mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine or serotonin (5HT3A) receptors, of 5HT3-immunopositive interneurons caused an increase in amplitude and slowing of the delta rhythm until each period became the "wave" component of the spike and wave discharge. As with the normal delta rhythm, the wave of a spike and wave discharge originated in cortical layer 5. In contrast, the "spike" component of the spike and wave discharge originated from a relative failure of fast inhibition in layers 2/3-switching pyramidal cell action potential outputs from single, sparse spiking during delta rhythms to brief, intense burst spiking, phase-locked to the field spike. The mechanisms underlying this loss of superficial layer fast inhibition, and a concomitant increase in slow inhibition, appeared to be precipitated by a loss of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-mediated local circuit inhibition and a subsequent increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated disinhibition. Blockade of NPY Y1 receptors was sufficient to generate spike and wave discharges, whereas blockade of VIP receptors almost completely abolished this form of epileptiform activity. These data suggest that aberrant, activity-dependent neuropeptide corelease can have catastrophic effects on neocortical dynamics."

Re-display model names without descriptions