Circuits that contain the Model Concept : Action Potentials

(A cycle of charging (or discharging) of an electrically excitable cell or group of cells. Different types of ions (charged atoms) move across the membranes as channels and receptors (pores) open or close in response to changes in the voltage or ligands.)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. 3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 and the NEURON code of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
2. 3D olfactory bulb: operators (Migliore et al, 2015)
"... Using a 3D model of mitral and granule cell interactions supported by experimental findings, combined with a matrix-based representation of glomerular operations, we identify the mechanisms for forming one or more glomerular units in response to a given odor, how and to what extent the glomerular units interfere or interact with each other during learning, their computational role within the olfactory bulb microcircuit, and how their actions can be formalized into a theoretical framework in which the olfactory bulb can be considered to contain "odor operators" unique to each individual. ..."
3. A detailed and fast model of extracellular recordings (Camunas-Mesa & Qurioga 2013)
"We present a novel method to generate realistic simulations of extracellular recordings. The simulations were obtained by superimposing the activity of neurons placed randomly in a cube of brain tissue. Detailed models of individual neurons were used to reproduce the extracellular action potentials of close-by neurons. ..."
4. Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network (Casellato et al. 2014)
" ... We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. ..."
5. Alpha rhythm in vitro visual cortex (Traub et al 2020)
The paper describes an experimental model of the alpha rhythm generated by layer 4 pyramidal neurons in a visual cortex slice. The simulation model is derived from that of Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol, developed for thalamocortical oscillations.
6. Burst induced synaptic plasticity in Apysia sensorimotor neurons (Phares et al 2003)
The Aplysia sensorimotor synapse is a key site of plasticity for several simple forms of learning. Intracellular stimulation of sensory neurons to fire a burst of action potentials at 10 Hz for 1 sec led to significant homosynaptic depression of postsynaptic responses. During the burst, the steady-state depressed phase of the postsynaptic response, which was only 20% of the initial EPSP of the burst, still contributed to firing the motor neuron. To explore the functional contribution of transient homosynaptic depression to the response of the motor neuron, computer simulations of the sensorimotor synapse with and without depression were compared. Depression allowed the motor neuron to produce graded responses over a wide range of presynaptic input strength. Thus, synaptic depression increased the dynamic range of the sensorimotor synapse and can, in principle, have a profound effect on information processing. Please see paper for results and details.
7. Bursting and oscillations in RD1 Retina driven by AII Amacrine Neuron (Choi et al. 2014)
"In many forms of retinal degeneration, photoreceptors die but inner retinal circuits remain intact. In the rd1 mouse, an established model for blinding retinal diseases, spontaneous activity in the coupled network of AII amacrine and ON cone bipolar cells leads to rhythmic bursting of ganglion cells. Since such activity could impair retinal and/or cortical responses to restored photoreceptor function, understanding its nature is important for developing treatments of retinal pathologies. Here we analyzed a compartmental model of the wild-type mouse AII amacrine cell to predict that the cell's intrinsic membrane properties, specifically, interacting fast Na and slow, M-type K conductances, would allow its membrane potential to oscillate when light-evoked excitatory synaptic inputs were withdrawn following photoreceptor degeneration. ..."
8. CA1 pyramidal cell: reconstructed axonal arbor and failures at weak gap junctions (Vladimirov 2011)
Model of pyramidal CA1 cells connected by gap junctions in their axons. Cell geometry is based on anatomical reconstruction of rat CA1 cell (NeuroMorpho.Org ID: NMO_00927) with long axonal arbor. Model init_2cells.hoc shows failures of second spike propagation in a spike doublet, depending on conductance of an axonal gap junction. Model init_ring.hoc shows that spike failure result in reentrant oscillations of a spike in a loop of axons connected by gap junctions, where one gap junction is weak. The paper shows that in random networks of axons connected by gap junctions, oscillations are driven by single pacemaker loop of axons. The shortest loop, around which a spike can travel, is the most likely pacemaker. This principle allows us to predict the frequency of oscillations from network connectivity and visa versa. We propose that this type of oscillations corresponds to so-called fast ripples in epileptic hippocampus.
9. Cancelling redundant input in ELL pyramidal cells (Bol et al. 2011)
The paper investigates the property of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of the brain of weakly electric fish to cancel predictable stimuli. Electroreceptors on the skin encode all signals in their firing activity, but superficial pyramidal (SP) cells in the ELL that receive this feedforward input do not respond to constant sinusoidal signals. This cancellation putatively occurs using a network of feedback delay lines and burst-induced synaptic plasticity between the delay lines and the SP cell that learns to cancel the redundant input. Biologically, the delay lines are parallel fibres from cerebellar-like granule cells in the eminentia granularis posterior. A model of this network (e.g. electroreceptors, SP cells, delay lines and burst-induced plasticity) was constructed to test whether the current knowledge of how the network operates is sufficient to cancel redundant stimuli.
10. Cerebellar cortex oscil. robustness from Golgi cell gap jncs (Simoes de Souza and De Schutter 2011)
" ... Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. ..."
11. Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
12. Contribution of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the neuronal network (Huang et al. 2009)
Epileptic seizures in diabetic hyperglycemia (DH) are not uncommon. This study aimed to determine the acute behavioral, pathological, and electrophysiological effects of status epilepticus (SE) on diabetic animals. ... We also used a simulation model to evaluate intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and neuroexcitability. ... In the simulation, increased intracellular ATP concentration promoted action potential firing. This finding that rats with DH had more brain damage after SE than rats without diabetes suggests the importance of intensively treating hyperglycemia and seizures in diabetic patients with epilepsy.
13. Convergence regulates synchronization-dependent AP transfer in feedforward NNs (Sailamul et al 2017)
We study how synchronization-dependent spike transfer can be affected by the structure of convergent feedforward wiring. We implemented computer simulations of model neural networks: a source and a target layer connected with different types of convergent wiring rules. In the Gaussian-Gaussian (GG) model, both the connection probability and the strength are given as Gaussian distribution as a function of spatial distance. In the Uniform-Constant (UC) and Uniform-Exponential (UE) models, the connection probability density is a uniform constant within a certain range, but the connection strength is set as a constant value or an exponentially decaying function, respectively. Then we examined how the spike transfer function is modulated under these conditions, while static or synchronized input patterns were introduced to simulate different levels of feedforward spike synchronization. We observed that the synchronization-dependent modulation of the transfer function appeared noticeably different for each convergence condition. The modulation of the spike transfer function was largest in the UC model, and smallest in the UE model. Our analysis showed that this difference was induced by the different spike weight distributions that was generated from convergent synapses in each model. Our results suggest that the structure of the feedforward convergence is a crucial factor for correlation-dependent spike control, thus must be considered important to understand the mechanism of information transfer in the brain.
14. Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
15. Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
16. H-currents effect on the fluctuation of gamma/beta oscillations (Avella-Gonzalez et al., 2015)
This model was designed to study the impact of H-currents on the dynamics of cortical oscillations, and in paticular on the occurrence of high and low amplitude episodes (HAE, LAE) in network oscillations. The H-current is a slow, hyperpolarization-activated, depolarizing current that contributes to neuronal resonance and membrane potential. We characterized amplitude fluctuations in network oscillations by measuring the average durations of HAEs and LAEs, and explored how these were modulated by trains of external spikes, both in the presence and absence of H-channels. We looked at HAE duration, the frequency and power of network oscillations, and the effect of H-channels on the temporal voltage profile in single cells. We found that H-currents increased the oscillation frequency and, in combination with external spikes, representing input from areas outside the network, strongly decreased the synchrony of firing. As a consequence, the oscillation power and the duration of episodes during which the network exhibited high-amplitude oscillations were greatly reduced in the presence of H-channels.
17. Hippocampal basket cell gap junction network dynamics (Saraga et al. 2006)
2 cell network of hippocampal basket cells connected by gap junctions. Paper explores how distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.
18. Homosynaptic plasticity in the tail withdrawal circuit (TWC) of Aplysia (Baxter and Byrne 2006)
The tail-withdrawal circuit of Aplysia provides a useful model system for investigating synaptic dynamics. Sensory neurons within the circuit manifest several forms of synaptic plasticity. Here, we developed a model of the circuit and investigated the ways in which depression (DEP) and potentiation (POT) contributed to information processing. DEP limited the amount of motor neuron activity that could be elicited by the monosynaptic pathway alone. POT within the monosynaptic pathway did not compensate for DEP. There was, however, a synergistic interaction between POT and the polysynaptic pathway. This synergism extended the dynamic range of the network, and the interplay between DEP and POT made the circuit respond preferentially to long-duration, low-frequency inputs.
19. Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
20. Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
21. Leech heart interneuron network model (Hill et al 2001, 2002)
We have created a computational model of the timing network that paces the heartbeat of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis. In the intact nerve cord, segmental oscillators are mutually entrained to the same cycle period. Although experiments have shown that the segmental oscillators are coupled by inhibitory coordinating interneurons, the underlying mechanisms of intersegmental coordination have not yet been elucidated. To help understand this coordination, we have created a simple computational model with two variants: symmetric and asymmetric. See references for more details. Biologically realistic network models with two, six, and eight cells and a tutorial are available at the links to Calabrese's web site below.
22. Mechanisms of very fast oscillations in axon networks coupled by gap junctions (Munro, Borgers 2010)
Axons connected by gap junctions can produce very fast oscillations (VFOs, > 80 Hz) when stimulated randomly at a low rate. The models here explore the mechanisms of VFOs that can be seen in an axonal plexus, (Munro & Borgers, 2009): a large network model of an axonal plexus, small network models of axons connected by gap junctions, and an implementation of the model underlying figure 12 in Traub et al. (1999) . The large network model consists of 3,072 5-compartment axons connected in a random network. The 5-compartment axons are the 5 axonal compartments from the CA3 pyramidal cell model in Traub et al. (1994) with a fixed somatic voltage. The random network has the same parameters as the random network in Traub et al. (1999), and axons are stimulated randomly via a Poisson process with a rate of 2/s/axon. The small network models simulate waves propagating through small networks of axons connected by gap junctions to study how local connectivity affects the refractory period.
23. Microcircuits of L5 thick tufted pyramidal cells (Hay & Segev 2015)
"... We simulated detailed conductance-based models of TTCs (Layer 5 thick tufted pyramidal cells) forming recurrent microcircuits that were interconnected as found experimentally; the network was embedded in a realistic background synaptic activity. ... Our findings indicate that dendritic nonlinearities are pivotal in controlling the gain and the computational functions of TTCs microcircuits, which serve as a dominant output source for the neocortex. "
24. Model of arrhythmias in a cardiac cells network (Casaleggio et al. 2014)
" ... Here we explore the possible processes leading to the occasional onset and termination of the (usually) non-fatal arrhythmias widely observed in the heart. Using a computational model of a two-dimensional network of cardiac cells, we tested the hypothesis that an ischemia alters the properties of the gap junctions inside the ischemic area. ... In conclusion, our model strongly supports the hypothesis that non-fatal arrhythmias can develop from post-ischemic alteration of the electrical connectivity in a relatively small area of the cardiac cell network, and suggests experimentally testable predictions on their possible treatments."
25. Modeling dendritic spikes and plasticity (Bono and Clopath 2017)
Biophysical model and reduced neuron model with voltage-dependent plasticity.
26. Modelling platform of the cochlear nucleus and other auditory circuits (Manis & Compagnola 2018)
"Models of the auditory brainstem have been an invaluable tool for testing hypotheses about auditory information processing and for highlighting the most important gaps in the experimental literature. Due to the complexity of the auditory brainstem, and indeed most brain circuits, the dynamic behavior of the system may be difficult to predict without a detailed, biologically realistic computational model. Despite the sensitivity of models to their exact construction and parameters, most prior models of the cochlear nucleus have incorporated only a small subset of the known biological properties. This confounds the interpretation of modelling results and also limits the potential future uses of these models, which require a large effort to develop. To address these issues, we have developed a general purpose, bio-physically detailed model of the cochlear nucleus for use both in testing hypotheses about cochlear nucleus function and also as an input to models of downstream auditory nuclei. The model implements conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley representations of cells using a Python-based interface to the NEURON simulator. ..."
27. Multiscale model of excitotoxicity in PD (Muddapu and Chakravarthy 2020)
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc). Although the exact cause of cell death is not clear, the hypothesis that metabolic deficiency is a key factor has been gaining attention in recent years. In the present study, we investigate this hypothesis using a multi-scale computational model of the subsystem of the basal ganglia comprising Subthalamic Nucleus (STN), Globus Pallidus externa (GPe) and SNc. The proposed model is a multiscale model in that interactions among the three nuclei are simulated using more abstract Izhikevich neuron models, while the molecular pathways involved in cell death of SNc neurons are simulated in terms of detailed chemical kinetics. Simulation results obtained from the proposed model showed that energy deficiencies occurring at cellular and network levels could precipitate the excitotoxic loss of SNc neurons in PD. At the subcellular level, the models show how calcium elevation leads to apoptosis of SNc neurons. The therapeutic effects of several neuroprotective interventions are also simulated in the model. From neuroprotective studies, it was clear that glutamate inhibition and apoptotic signal blocker therapies were able to halt the progression of SNc cell loss when compared to other therapeutic interventions, which only slows down the progression of SNc cell loss.
28. Neocort. pyramidal cells subthreshold somatic voltage controls spike propagation (Munro Kopell 2012)
There is suggestive evidence that pyramidal cell axons in neocortex may be coupled by gap junctions into an ``axonal plexus" capable of generating Very Fast Oscillations (VFOs) with frequencies exceeding 80 Hz. It is not obvious, however, how a pyramidal cell in such a network could control its output when action potentials are free to propagate from the axons of other pyramidal cells into its own axon. We address this problem by means of simulations based on 3D reconstructions of pyramidal cells from rat somatosensory cortex. We show that somatic depolarization enables propagation via gap junctions into the initial segment and main axon, while somatic hyperpolarization disables it. We show further that somatic voltage cannot effectively control action potential propagation through gap junctions on minor collaterals; action potentials may therefore propagate freely from such collaterals regardless of somatic voltage. In previous work, VFOs are all but abolished during the hyperpolarization phase of slow-oscillations induced by anesthesia in vivo. This finding constrains the density of gap junctions on collaterals in our model and suggests that axonal sprouting due to cortical lesions may result in abnormally high gap junction density on collaterals, leading in turn to excessive VFO activity and hence to epilepsy via kindling.
29. Norns - Neural Network Studio (Visser & Van Gils 2014)
The Norns - Neural Network Studio is a software package for designing, simulation and analyzing networks of spiking neurons. It consists of three parts: 1. "Urd": a Matlab frontend with high-level functions for quickly defining networks 2. "Verdandi": an optimized C++ simulation environment which runs the simulation defined by Urd 3. "Skuld": an advanced Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) for visual inspection of simulated data.
30. Olfactory bulb cluster formation (Migliore et al. 2010)
Functional roles of distributed synaptic clusters in the mitral-granule cell network of the olfactory bulb.
31. Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell column formation (Migliore et al. 2007)
In the olfactory bulb, the processing units for odor discrimination are believed to involve dendrodendritic synaptic interactions between mitral and granule cells. There is increasing anatomical evidence that these cells are organized in columns, and that the columns processing a given odor are arranged in widely distributed arrays. Experimental evidence is lacking on the underlying learning mechanisms for how these columns and arrays are formed. We have used a simplified realistic circuit model to test the hypothesis that distributed connectivity can self-organize through an activity-dependent dendrodendritic synaptic mechanism. The results point to action potentials propagating in the mitral cell lateral dendrites as playing a critical role in this mechanism, and suggest a novel and robust learning mechanism for the development of distributed processing units in a cortical structure.
32. Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell: dendrodendritic microcircuits (Migliore and Shepherd 2008)
This model shows how backpropagating action potentials in the long lateral dendrites of mitral cells, together with granule cell actions on mitral cells within narrow columns forming glomerular units, can provide a mechanism to activate strong local inhibition between arbitrarily distant mitral cells. The simulations predict a new role for the dendrodendritic synapses in the multicolumnar organization of the granule cells.
33. Olfactory bulb mitral cell: synchronization by gap junctions (Migliore et al 2005)
In a realistic model of two electrically connected mitral cells, the paper shows that the somatically-measured experimental properties of Gap Junctions (GJs) may correspond to a variety of different local coupling strengths and dendritic distributions of GJs in the tuft. The model suggests that the propagation of the GJ-induced local tuft depolarization is a major mechanim for intraglomerular synchronization of mitral cells.
34. Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule cell circuits (Migliore & McTavish 2013)
Model files for the entry "Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule Cell Circuits" of the Springer Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience by Michele Migliore and Tom Mctavish. The simulations illustrate two typical Mitral-Granule cell circuits in the olfactory bulb of vertebrates: distance-independent lateral inhibition and gating effects.
35. Parallel odor processing by mitral and middle tufted cells in the OB (Cavarretta et al 2016, 2018)
"[...] experimental findings suggest that MC and mTC may encode parallel and complementary odor representations. We have analyzed the functional roles of these pathways by using a morphologically and physiologically realistic three-dimensional model to explore the MC and mTC microcircuits in the glomerular layer and deeper plexiform layers. [...]"
36. Principles of Computational Modelling in Neuroscience (Book) (Sterratt et al. 2011)
"... This book provides a step-by-step account of how to model the neuron and neural circuitry to understand the nervous system at all levels, from ion channels to networks. Starting with a simple model of the neuron as an electrical circuit, gradually more details are added to include the effects of neuronal morphology, synapses, ion channels and intracellular signaling. The principle of abstraction is explained through chapters on simplifying models, and how simplified models can be used in networks. This theme is continued in a final chapter on modeling the development of the nervous system. Requiring an elementary background in neuroscience and some high school mathematics, this textbook is an ideal basis for a course on computational neuroscience."
37. Purkinje neuron network (Zang et al. 2020)
Both spike rate and timing can transmit information in the brain. Phase response curves (PRCs) quantify how a neuron transforms input to output by spike timing. PRCs exhibit strong firing-rate adaptation, but its mechanism and relevance for network output are poorly understood. Using our Purkinje cell (PC) model we demonstrate that the rate adaptation is caused by rate-dependent subthreshold membrane potentials efficiently regulating the activation of Na+ channels. Then we use a realistic PC network model to examine how rate-dependent responses synchronize spikes in the scenario of reciprocal inhibition-caused high-frequency oscillations. The changes in PRC cause oscillations and spike correlations only at high firing rates. The causal role of the PRC is confirmed using a simpler coupled oscillator network model. This mechanism enables transient oscillations between fast-spiking neurons that thereby form PC assemblies. Our work demonstrates that rate adaptation of PRCs can spatio-temporally organize the PC input to cerebellar nuclei.
38. Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.
39. SCN1A gain-of-function in early infantile encephalopathy (Berecki et al 2019)
"OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the biophysical basis underlying the distinct and severe clinical presentation in patients with the recurrent missense SCN1A variant, p.Thr226Met. Patients with this variant show a well-defined genotype-phenotype correlation and present with developmental and early infantile epileptic encephalopathy that is far more severe than typical SCN1A Dravet syndrome. METHODS: Whole cell patch clamp and dynamic action potential clamp were used to study T226M Nav 1.1 channels expressed in mammalian cells. Computational modeling was used to explore the neuronal scale mechanisms that account for altered action potential firing. RESULTS: T226M channels exhibited hyperpolarizing shifts of the activation and inactivation curves and enhanced fast inactivation. Dynamic action potential clamp hybrid simulation showed that model neurons containing T226M conductance displayed a left shift in rheobase relative to control. At current stimulation levels that produced repetitive action potential firing in control model neurons, depolarization block and cessation of action potential firing occurred in T226M model neurons. Fully computationally simulated neuron models recapitulated the findings from dynamic action potential clamp and showed that heterozygous T226M models were also more susceptible to depolarization block. ..."
40. Simulation studies on mechanisms of levetiracetam-mediated inhibition of IK(DR) (Huang et al. 2009)
Levetiracetam (LEV) is an S-enantiomer pyrrolidone derivative with established antiepileptic efficacy in generalized epilepsy and partial epilepsy. However, its effects on ion currents and membrane potential remain largely unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of LEV on differentiated NG108-15 neurons. ... Simulation studies in a modified Hodgkin-Huxley neuron and network unraveled that the reduction of slowly inactivating IK(DR) resulted in membrane depolarization accompanied by termination of the firing of action potentials in a stochastic manner. Therefore, the inhibitory effects on slowly inactivating IK(DR) (Kv3.1-encoded current) may constitute one of the underlying mechanisms through which LEV affects neuronal activity in vivo.
41. Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
42. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
43. Thalamic network model of deep brain stimulation in essential tremor (Birdno et al. 2012)
"... Thus the decreased effectiveness of temporally irregular DBS trains is due to long pauses in the stimulus trains, not the degree of temporal irregularity alone. We also conducted computer simulations of neuronal responses to the experimental stimulus trains using a biophysical model of the thalamic network. Trains that suppressed tremor in volunteers also suppressed fluctuations in thalamic transmembrane potential at the frequency associated with cerebellar burst-driver inputs. Clinical and computational findings indicate that DBS suppresses tremor by masking burst-driver inputs to the thalamus and that pauses in stimulation prevent such masking. Although stimulation of other anatomic targets may provide tremor suppression, we propose that the most relevant neuronal targets for effective tremor suppression are the afferent cerebellar fibers that terminate in the thalamus."
44. Thalamocortical control of propofol phase-amplitude coupling (Soplata et al 2017)
"The anesthetic propofol elicits many different spectral properties on the EEG, including alpha oscillations (8-12 Hz), Slow Wave Oscillations (SWO, 0.1-1.5 Hz), and dose-dependent phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between alpha and SWO. Propofol is known to increase GABAA inhibition and decrease H-current strength, but how it generates these rhythms and their interactions is still unknown. To investigate both generation of the alpha rhythm and its PAC to SWO, we simulate a Hodgkin-Huxley network model of a hyperpolarized thalamus and corticothalamic inputs. ..."
45. Theory of sequence memory in neocortex (Hawkins & Ahmad 2016)
"... First we show that a neuron with several thousand synapses segregated on active dendrites can recognize hundreds of independent patterns of cellular activity even in the presence of large amounts of noise and pattern variation. We then propose a neuron model where patterns detected on proximal dendrites lead to action potentials, defining the classic receptive field of the neuron, and patterns detected on basal and apical dendrites act as predictions by slightly depolarizing the neuron without generating an action potential. By this mechanism, a neuron can predict its activation in hundreds of independent contexts. We then present a network model based on neurons with these properties that learns time-based sequences. ..."
46. Understanding odor information segregation in the olfactory bulb by MC/TCs (Polese et al. 2014)
Odor identification is one of the main tasks of the olfactory system. It is performed almost independently from the concentration of the odor providing a robust recognition. This capacity to ignore concentration information does not preclude the olfactory system from estimating concentration itself. Significant experimental evidence has indicated that the olfactory system is able to infer simultaneously odor identity and intensity. However, it is still unclear at what level or levels of the olfactory pathway this segregation of information occurs. In this work, we study whether this odor information segregation is performed at the input stage of the olfactory bulb: the glomerular layer.

Re-display model names without descriptions