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Models that contain the Model Topic : Active Dendrites

(These dendrites contain electrically excitable (voltage-gated) channels in the membrane.)

   Models   Description
3D model of the olfactory bulb (Migliore et al. 2014)
This entry contains a link to a full HD version of movie 1 of the paper: "Distributed organization of a brain microcircuit analysed by three-dimensional modeling: the olfactory bulb" by M Migliore, F Cavarretta, ML Hines, and GM Shepherd.
A multi-compartment model for interneurons in the dLGN (Halnes et al. 2011)
This model for dLGN interneurons is presented in two parameterizations (P1 & P2), which were fitted to current-clamp data from two different interneurons (IN1 & IN2). The model qualitatively reproduces the responses in IN1 & IN2 under 8 different experimental condition, and quantitatively reproduces the I/O-relations (#spikes elicited as a function of injected current).
A set of reduced models of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Bahl et al. 2012)
These are the NEURON files for 10 different models of a reduced L5 pyramidal neuron. The parameters were obtained by automatically fitting the models to experimental data using a multi objective evolutionary search strategy. Details on the algorithm can be found at www.g-node.org/emoo and in Bahl et al. (2012).
A simple integrative electrophysiological model of bursting GnRH neurons (Csercsik et al. 2011)
In this paper a modular model of the GnRH neuron is presented. For the aim of simplicity, the currents corresponding to fast time scales and action potential generation are described by an impulsive system, while the slower currents and calcium dynamics are described by usual ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The model is able to reproduce the depolarizing afterpotentials, afterhyperpolarization, periodic bursting behavior and the corresponding calcium transients observed in the case of GnRH neurons.
A simplified cerebellar Purkinje neuron (the PPR model) (Brown et al. 2011)
These models were implemented in NEURON by Sherry-Ann Brown in the laboratory of Leslie M. Loew. The files reproduce Figures 2c-f from Brown et al, 2011 "Virtual NEURON: a Strategy For Merged Biochemical and Electrophysiological Modeling".
Action potential-evoked Na+ influx are similar in axon and soma (Fleidervish et al. 2010)
"In cortical pyramidal neurons, the axon initial segment (AIS) is pivotal in synaptic integration. It has been asserted that this is because there is a high density of Na+ channels in the AIS. However, we found that action potential–associated Na+ flux, as measured by high-speed fluorescence Na+ imaging, was about threefold larger in the rat AIS than in the soma. Spike-evoked Na+ flux in the AIS and the first node of Ranvier was similar and was eightfold lower in basal dendrites. ... In computer simulations, these data were consistent with the known features of action potential generation in these neurons."
Active dendrites and spike propagation in a hippocampal interneuron (Saraga et al 2003)
We create multi-compartment models of an Oriens-Lacunosum/Moleculare (O-LM) hippocampal interneuron using passive properties, channel kinetics, densities and distributions specific to this cell type, and explore its signaling characteristics. We find that spike initiation depends on both location and amount of input, as well as the intrinsic properties of the interneuron. Distal synaptic input always produces strong back-propagating spikes whereas proximal input could produce both forward and back-propagating spikes depending on the input strength. Please see paper for more details. Fernanda.Saraga@utoronto.ca
Amyloid beta (IA block) effects on a model CA1 pyramidal cell (Morse et al. 2010)
The model simulations provide evidence oblique dendrites in CA1 pyramidal neurons are susceptible to hyper-excitability by amyloid beta block of the transient K+ channel, IA. See paper for details.
BCM-like synaptic plasticity with conductance-based models (Narayanan Johnston, 2010)
" ... Although the BCM-like plasticity framework has been a useful formulation to understand synaptic plasticity and metaplasticity, a mechanism for the activity-dependent regulation of this modification threshold has remained an open question. In this simulation study based on CA1 pyramidal cells, we use a modification of the calcium-dependent hypothesis proposed elsewhere and show that a change in the hyperpolarization-activated, nonspecific-cation h current is capable of shifting the modification threshold. ..."
CA1 oriens alveus interneurons: signaling properties (Minneci et al. 2007)
The model supports the experimental findings showing that the dynamic interaction between cells with various firing patterns could differently affect GABAergic signaling, leading to a wide range of interneuronal communication within the hippocampal network.
CA1 pyramidal neuron (Migliore et al 1999)
Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron model from the paper M.Migliore, D.A Hoffman, J.C. Magee and D. Johnston (1999) Role of an A-type K+ conductance in the back-propagation of action potentials in the dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, J. Comput. Neurosci. 7, 5-15. Instructions are provided in the below README file.Contact michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: as a 2-layer NN and subthreshold synaptic summation (Poirazi et al 2003)
We developed a CA1 pyramidal cell model calibrated with a broad spectrum of in vitro data. Using simultaneous dendritic and somatic recordings, and combining results for two different response measures (peak vs. mean EPSP), two different stimulus formats (single shock vs. 50 Hz trains), and two different spatial integration conditions (within vs. between-branch summation), we found the cell's subthreshold responses to paired inputs are best described as a sum of nonlinear subunit responses, where the subunits correspond to different dendritic branches. In addition to suggesting a new type of experiment and providing testable predictions, our model shows how conclusions regarding synaptic arithmetic can be influenced by an array of seemingly innocuous experimental design choices.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: calculation of MRI signals (Cassara et al. 2008)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Cassarŕ AM, Hagberg GE, Bianciardi M, Migliore M, Maraviglia B. Realistic simulations of neuronal activity: A contribution to the debate on direct detection of neuronal currents by MRI. Neuroimage. 39:87-106 (2008). In this paper, we use a detailed calculation of the magnetic field produced by the neuronal currents propagating over a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron placed inside a cubic MR voxel of length 1.2 mm to estimate the Magnetic Resonance signal.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: conditional boosting of dendritic APs (Watanabe et al 2002)
Model files from the paper Watanabe S, Hoffman DA, Migliore M, Johnston D (2002). The experimental and modeling results support the hypothesis that dendritic K-A channels and the boosting of back-propagating action potentials contribute to the induction of LTP in CA1 neurons. See the paper for details. Questions about the model may be addressed to Michele Migliore: michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it
CA1 pyramidal neuron: dendritic spike initiation (Gasparini et al 2004)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Sonia Gasparini, Michele Migliore, and Jeffrey C. Magee On the initiation and propagation of dendritic spikes in CA1 pyramidal neurons, J. Neurosci., J. Neurosci. 24:11046-11056 (2004).
CA1 pyramidal neuron: effects of Ih on distal inputs (Migliore et al 2004)
NEURON mod files from the paper: M. Migliore, L. Messineo, M. Ferrante Dendritic Ih selectively blocks temporal summation of unsynchronized distal inputs in CA1 pyramidal neurons, J.Comput. Neurosci. 16:5-13 (2004). The model demonstrates how the dendritic Ih in pyramidal neurons could selectively suppress AP generation for a volley of excitatory afferents when they are asynchronously and distally activated.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: effects of Lamotrigine on dendritic excitability (Poolos et al 2002)
NEURON mod files from N. Poolos, M. Migliore, and D. Johnston, Nature Neuroscience (2002). The experimental and modeling results in this paper demonstrate for the first time that neuronal excitability can be altered by pharmaceuticals acting selectively on dendrites, and suggest an important role for Ih in controlling dendritic excitability and epileptogenesis.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: effects of R213Q and R312W Kv7.2 mutations (Miceli et al. 2013)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Miceli et al, Genotype–phenotype correlations in neonatal epilepsies caused by mutations in the voltage sensor of Kv7.2 potassium channel subunits, PNAS 2013 Feb 25. [Epub ahead of print] In this paper, functional studies revealed that in homomeric or heteromeric configuration with KV7.2 and/or KV7.3 subunits, R213W and R213Q mutations markedly destabilized the open state, causing a dramatic decrease in channel voltage sensitivity. Modeling these channels in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells revealed that both mutations increased cell firing frequency, with the R213Q mutation prompting more dramatic functional changes compared with the R213W mutation.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: integration of subthreshold inputs from PP and SC (Migliore 2003)
The model shows how the experimentally observed increase in the dendritic density of Ih and IA could have a major role in constraining the temporal integration window for the main CA1 synaptic inputs.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: rebound spiking (Ascoli et al.2010)
The model demonstrates that CA1 pyramidal neurons support rebound spikes mediated by hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih), and normally masked by A-type potassium channels (KA). Partial KA reduction confined to one or few branches of the apical tuft may be sufficient to elicit a local spike following a train of synaptic inhibition. These data suggest that the plastic regulation of KA can provide a dynamic switch to unmask post-inhibitory spiking in CA1 pyramidal neurons, further increasing the signal processing power of the CA1 synaptic microcircuitry.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: schizophrenic behavior (Migliore et al. 2011)
NEURON files from the paper: A modeling study suggesting how a reduction in the context-dependent input on CA1 pyramidal neurons could generate schizophrenic behavior. by M. Migliore, I. De Blasi, D. Tegolo, R. Migliore, Neural Networks,(2011), doi:10.1016/j.neunet.2011.01.001. Starting from the experimentally supported assumption on hippocampal neurons we explore an experimentally testable prediction at the single neuron level. The model shows how and to what extent a pathological hypofunction of a contextdependent distal input on a CA1 neuron can generate hallucinations by altering the normal recall of objects on which the neuron has been previously tuned. The results suggest that a change in the context during the recall phase may cause an occasional but very significant change in the set of active dendrites used for features recognition, leading to a distorted perception of objects.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: signal propagation in oblique dendrites (Migliore et al 2005)
NEURON mod files from the paper: M. Migliore, M. Ferrante, GA Ascoli (2005). The model shows how the back- and forward propagation of action potentials in the oblique dendrites of CA1 neurons could be modulated by local properties such as morphology or active conductances.
CA1 Pyramidal Neuron: slow Na+ inactivation (Migliore 1996)
Model files from the paper: M. Migliore, Modeling the attenuation and failure of action potentials in the dendrites of hippocampal neurons, Biophys. J. 71:2394-403 (1996). Please see the below readme file for installation and use instructions. Contact michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
CA1 pyramidal neurons: binding properties and the magical number 7 (Migliore et al. 2008)
NEURON files from the paper: Single neuron binding properties and the magical number 7, by M. Migliore, G. Novara, D. Tegolo, Hippocampus, in press (2008). In an extensive series of simulations with realistic morphologies and active properties, we demonstrate how n radial (oblique) dendrites of these neurons may be used to bind n inputs to generate an output signal. The results suggest a possible neural code as the most effective n-ple of dendrites that can be used for short-term memory recollection of persons, objects, or places. Our analysis predicts a straightforward physiological explanation for the observed puzzling limit of about 7 short-term memory items that can be stored by humans.
CA1 pyramidal neurons: effects of a Kv7.2 mutation (Miceli et al. 2009)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Miceli et al, Neutralization of a unique, negatively-charged residue in the voltage sensor of K(V)7.2 subunits in a sporadic case of benign familial neonatal seizures, Neurobiol Dis., in press (2009). In this paper, the model revealed that the gating changes introduced by a mutation in K(v)7.2 genes encoding for the neuronal KM current in a case of benign familial neonatal seizures, increased cell firing frequency, thereby triggering the neuronal hyperexcitability which underlies the observed neonatal epileptic condition.
CA1 pyramidal neurons: effects of Alzheimer (Culmone and Migliore 2012)
The model predicts possible therapeutic treatments of Alzheimers's Disease in terms of pharmacological manipulations of channels' kinetic and activation properties. The results suggest how and which mechanism can be targeted by a drug to restore the original firing conditions. The simulations reproduce somatic membrane potential in control conditions, when 90% of membrane is affected by AD (Fig.4A of the paper), and after treatment (Fig.4B of the paper).
CA1 pyramidal: Stochastic amplification of KCa in Ca2+ microdomains (Stanley et al. 2011)
This minimal model investigates stochastic amplification of calcium-activated potassium (KCa) currents. Amplification results from calcium being released in short high amplitude pulses associated with the stochastic gating of calcium channels in microdomains. This model predicts that such pulsed release of calcium significantly increases subthreshold SK2 currents above what would be produced by standard deterministic models. However, there is little effect on a simple sAHP current kinetic scheme. This suggests that calcium stochasticity and microdomains should be considered when modeling certain KCa currents near subthreshold conditions.
CA1 stratum radiatum interneuron multicompartmental model (Katona et al. 2011)
The model examines dendritic NMDA-spike generation and propagation in the dendrites of CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons. It contains NMDA-channels in a clustered pattern on a dendrite and K-channels. The simulation shows the whole NMDA spike and the rising phase of the traces in separate windows.
CA3 pyramidal cell: rhythmogenesis in a reduced Traub model (Pinsky, Rinzel 1994)
Fig. 2A and 3 are reproduced in this simulation of Pinsky PF, Rinzel J (1994).
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Lazarewicz et al 2002)
The model shows how using a CA1-like distribution of active dendritic conductances in a CA3 morphology results in dendritic initiation of spikes during a burst.
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Safiulina et al. 2010)
In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. To compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in postnatal development, a realistic model was constructed taking into account the different biophysical properties of these synapses.
CA3 pyramidal neuron: firing properties (Hemond et al. 2008)
In the paper, this model was used to identify how relative differences in K+ conductances, specifically KC, KM, & KD, between cells contribute to the different characteristics of the three types of firing patterns observed experimentally.
Calcium spikes in basal dendrites (Kampa and Stuart 2006)
This model was published in Kampa & Stuart (2006) J Neurosci 26(28):7424-32. The simulation creates two plots showing voltage and calcium changes in basal dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons during action potential backpropagation. created by B. Kampa (2006)
Calcium waves and mGluR-dependent synaptic plasticity in CA1 pyr. neurons (Ashhad & Narayanan 2013)
A morphologically realistic, conductance-based model equipped with kinetic schemes that govern several calcium signalling modules and pathways in CA1 pyramidal neurons
Cancelling redundant input in ELL pyramidal cells (Bol et al. 2011)
The paper investigates the property of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) of the brain of weakly electric fish to cancel predictable stimuli. Electroreceptors on the skin encode all signals in their firing activity, but superficial pyramidal (SP) cells in the ELL that receive this feedforward input do not respond to constant sinusoidal signals. This cancellation putatively occurs using a network of feedback delay lines and burst-induced synaptic plasticity between the delay lines and the SP cell that learns to cancel the redundant input. Biologically, the delay lines are parallel fibres from cerebellar-like granule cells in the eminentia granularis posterior. A model of this network (e.g. electroreceptors, SP cells, delay lines and burst-induced plasticity) was constructed to test whether the current knowledge of how the network operates is sufficient to cancel redundant stimuli.
Cerebellar Nucleus Neuron (Steuber, Schultheiss, Silver, De Schutter & Jaeger, 2010)
This is the GENESIS 2.3 implementation of a multi-compartmental deep cerebellar nucleus (DCN) neuron model with a full dendritic morphology and appropriate active conductances. We generated a good match of our simulations with DCN current clamp data we recorded in acute slices, including the heterogeneity in the rebound responses. We then examined how inhibitory and excitatory synaptic input interacted with these intrinsic conductances to control DCN firing. We found that the output spiking of the model reflected the ongoing balance of excitatory and inhibitory input rates and that changing the level of inhibition performed an additive operation. Rebound firing following strong Purkinje cell input bursts was also possible, but only if the chloride reversal potential was more negative than -70 mV to allow de-inactivation of rebound currents. Fast rebound bursts due to T-type calcium current and slow rebounds due to persistent sodium current could be differentially regulated by synaptic input, and the pattern of these rebounds was further influenced by HCN current. Our findings suggest that active properties of DCN neurons could play a crucial role for signal processing in the cerebellum.
Cerebellar purkinje cell (De Schutter and Bower 1994)
Tutorial simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell. This tutorial is based upon a GENESIS simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell, modeled and fine-tuned by Erik de Schutter. The tutorial assumes that you have a basic knowledge of the Purkinje cell and its synaptic inputs. It gives visual insight in how different properties as concentrations and channel conductances vary and interact within a real Purkinje cell.
Cerebellar purkinje cell: K and Ca channels regulate APs (Miyasho et al 2001)
We adopted De Schutter and Bower's model as the starting point, then modified the descriptions of several ion channels, such as the P-type Ca channel and the delayed rectifier K channel, and added class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels to the model. Our new model reproduces most of our experimental results and supports the conclusions of our experimental study that class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels are present and functioning in the dendrites of Purkinje neurons.
Chirp stimulus responses in a morphologically realistic model (Narayanan and Johnston, 2007)
...we built a multicompartmental model with a morphologically realistic three-dimensional reconstruction of a CA1 pyramidal neuron. The only active conductance we added to the model was the h conductance. ... We conclude that experimentally observed gradient in density of h channels could theoretically account for experimentally observed gradient in resonance properties (Narayanan and Johnston, 2007).
Comparison of full and reduced globus pallidus models (Hendrickson 2010)
In this paper, we studied what features of realistic full model activity patterns can and cannot be preserved by morphologically reduced models. To this end, we reduced the morphological complexity of a full globus pallidus neuron model possessing active dendrites and compared its spontaneous and driven responses to those of the reduced models.
Conditions of dominant effectiveness of distal dendrites (Korogod, Kulagina 1998)
The model illustrates and explains bistable spatial patterns of the current transfer effectiveness in the active dendrite with distributed (multiple) tonic excitatory, NMDA type, synaptic input.
Contrast invariance by LGN synaptic depression (Banitt et al. 2007)
"Simple cells in layer 4 of the primary visual cortex of the cat show contrast-invariant orientation tuning, in which the amplitude of the peak response is proportional to the stimulus contrast but the width of the tuning curve hardly changes with contrast. This study uses a detailed model of spiny stellate cells (SSCs) from cat area 17 to explain this property. The model integrates our experimental data, including morphological and intrinsic membrane properties and the number and spatial distribution of four major synaptic input sources of the SSC: the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and three cortical sources. ... The model response is in close agreement with experimental results, in terms of both output spikes and membrane voltage (amplitude and fluctuations), with reasonable exceptions given that recurrent connections were not incorporated."
Cortical network model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis (Bush et al 1999)
This simulation from Bush, Prince, and Miller 1999 shows the epileptiform response (Fig. 6C) to a brief single stimulation in a 500 cell network of multicompartment models, some of which have active dendrites. The results which I obtained under Redhat Linux is shown in result.gif. Original 1997 code from Paul Bush modified slightly by Bill Lytton to make it work with current version of NEURON (5.7.139). Thanks to Paul Bush and Ken Miller for making the code available.
Dendritic L-type Ca currents in motoneurons (Carlin et al 2000)
A component of recorded currents demonstrated kinetics consistent with a current originating at a site spatially segregated from the soma. In response to step commands this component was seen as a late-onset, low amplitude persistent current whilst in response to depolarizing-repolarizing ramp commands a low voltage clockwise current hysteresis was recorded. Simulations using a neuromorphic motoneuron model could reproduce these currents only if a noninactivating calcium conductance was placed in the dendritic compartments.
Dendritic Na inactivation drives a decrease in ISI (Fernandez et al 2005)
We use a combination of dynamical analysis and electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that spike broadening in dendrites is primarily caused by a cumulative inactivation of dendritic Na(+) current. We further show that a reduction in dendritic Na(+) current increases excitability by decreasing the interspike interval (ISI) and promoting burst firing.
Dendritic Na+ spike initiation and backpropagation of APs in active dendrites (Nevian et al. 2007)
NEURON model used to create simulations shown in figure 6 of the paper. The model includes two point processes; one for dendritic spike initiation and the other for somatic action potential generation. The effect of filtering by imperfect recording electrode can be examined in somatic and dendritic locations.
Dendritic signals command firing dynamics in a Cerebellar Purkinje Cell model (Genet et al. 2010)
This model endows the dendrites of a reconstructed Purkinje cells (PC) with the mechanism of Ca-dependent plateau potentials and spikes described in Genet, S., and B. Delord. 2002. A biophysical model of nonlinear dynamics underlying plateau potentials and calcium spikes in Purkinje cell dendrites. J. Neurophysiol. 88:2430–2444). It is a part of a comprehensive mathematical study suggesting that active electric signals in the dendrites of PC command epochs of firing and silencing of the PC soma.
Dendritica (Vetter et al 2001)
Dendritica is a collection of programs for relating dendritic geometry and signal propagation. The programs are based on those used for the simulations described in: Vetter, P., Roth, A. & Hausser, M. (2001) For reprint requests and additional information please contact Dr. M. Hausser, email address: m.hausser@ucl.ac.uk
Dichotomy of action-potential backpropagation in CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites (Golding et al 2001)
From reference below and Corrigendum: J Neurophysiol 87:1a, 2002 (better versions of figures 2, 3, 5 and 7 because of poor print quality in the original article; as of 2/2006, these figures are perfectly fine in the PDF of the original article that is currently available from the publisher's WWW site). Examines the anatomical and biophysical factors that account for the fact that retrograde invasion of spikes into the apical dendritic tree past 300 um succeeds in some CA1 pyramidal neurons but fails in others.
Excitability of PFC Basal Dendrites (Acker and Antic 2008)
".. We carried out multi-site voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium or Ih, conductance had little effect on dendritic action potential propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling (NEURON) was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a non-uniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a non-uniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high frequency trains of action potentials, and the local generation of sodium spikelets. ..."
Excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites (Behabadi et al. 2012)
" ... We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. ..."
Functional impact of dendritic branch point morphology (Ferrante et al., 2013)
" ... Here, we first quantified the morphological variability of branch points from two-photon images of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We then investigated the geometrical features affecting spike initiation, propagation, and timing with a computational model validated by glutamate uncaging experiments. The results suggest that even subtle membrane readjustments at branch point could drastically alter the ability of synaptic input to generate, propagate, and time action potentials."
Functional structure of mitral cell dendritic tuft (Djurisic et al. 2008)
The computational modeling component of Djurisic et al. 2008 addressed two primary questions: whether amplification by active currents is necessary to explain the relatively mild attenuation suffered by tuft EPSPs spreading along the primary dendrite to the soma; what accounts for the relatively uniform peak EPSP amplitude throughout the tuft. These simulations show that passive spread from tuft to soma is sufficient to yield the low attenuation of tuft EPSPs, and that random distribution of a biologically plausible number of excitatory synapses throughout the tuft can produce the experimentally observed uniformity of depolarization.
Geometry-induced features of current transfer in neuronal dendrites (Korogod, Kulagina 1998)
The impact of dendritic geometry on somatopetal transfer of the current generated by steady uniform activation of excitatory synaptic conductance distributed over passive, or active (Hodgkin-Huxley type), dendrites was studied in simulated neurons.
Globus pallidus multi-compartmental model neuron with realistic morphology (Gunay et al. 2008)
"Globus pallidus (GP) neurons recorded in brain slices show significant variability in intrinsic electrophysiological properties. To investigate how this variability arises, we manipulated the biophysical properties of GP neurons using computer simulations. ... Our results indicated that most of the experimental variability could be matched by varying conductance densities, which we confirmed with additional partial block experiments. Further analysis resulted in two key observations: (1) each voltage-gated conductance had effects on multiple measures such as action potential waveform and spontaneous or stimulated spike rates; and (2) the effect of each conductance was highly dependent on the background context of other conductances present. In some cases, such interactions could reverse the effect of the density of one conductance on important excitability measures. ..."
Globus pallidus neuron models with differing dendritic Na channel expression (Edgerton et al., 2010)
A set of 9 multi-compartmental rat GP neuron models (585 compartments) differing only in their expression of dendritic fast sodium channels were compared in their synaptic integration properties. Dendritic fast sodium channels were found to increase the importance of distal synapses (both excitatory AND inhibitory), increase spike timing variability with in vivo-like synaptic input, and make the model neurons highly sensitive to clustered synchronous excitation.
GP Neuron, somatic and dendritic phase response curves (Schultheiss et al. 2011)
Phase response analysis of a GP neuron model showing type I PRCs for somatic inputs and type II PRCs for dendritic excitation. Analysis of intrinsic currents underlying type II dendritic PRCs.
Hippocampal basket cell gap junction network dynamics (Saraga et al. 2006)
2 cell network of hippocampal basket cells connected by gap junctions. Paper explores how distal gap junctions and active dendrites can tune network dynamics.
Impact of dendritic atrophy on intrinsic and synaptic excitability (Narayanan & Chattarji, 2010)
These simulations examined the atrophy induced changes in electrophysiological properties of CA3 pyramidal neurons. We found these neurons change from bursting to regular spiking as atrophy increases. Region-specific atrophy induced region-specific increases in synaptic excitability in a passive dendritic tree. All dendritic compartments of an atrophied neuron had greater synaptic excitability and a larger voltage transfer to the soma than the control neuron.
Impact of dendritic size and topology on pyramidal cell burst firing (van Elburg and van Ooyen 2010)
The code provided here was written to systematically investigate which of the physical parameters controlled by dendritic morphology underlies the differences in spiking behaviour observed in different realizations of the 'ping-pong'-model. Structurally varying dendritic topology and length in a simplified model allows us to separate out the physical parameters derived from morphology underlying burst firing.

To perform the parameter scans we created a new NEURON tool the MultipleRunControl which can be used to easily set up a parameter scan and write the simulation results to file.

Using this code we found that not input conductance but the arrival time of the return current, as measured provisionally by the average electrotonic path length, determines whether the pyramidal cell (with ping-pong model dynamics) will burst or fire single spikes.
KV1 channel governs cerebellar output to thalamus (Ovsepian et al. 2013)
The output of the cerebellum to the motor axis of the central nervous system is orchestrated mainly by synaptic inputs and intrinsic pacemaker activity of deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) projection neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that the soma of these cells is enriched with KV1 channels produced by mandatory multi-merization of KV1.1, 1.2 alpha andKV beta2 subunits. Being constitutively active, the K+ current (IKV1) mediated by these channels stabilizes the rate and regulates the temporal precision of self-sustained firing of these neurons. ... Through the use of multi-compartmental modelling and ... the physiological significance of the described functions for processing and communication of information from the lateral DCN to thalamic relay nuclei is established.
L5b PC model constrained for BAC firing and perisomatic current step firing (Hay et al., 2011)
"... L5b pyramidal cells have been the subject of extensive experimental and modeling studies, yet conductance-based models of these cells that faithfully reproduce both their perisomatic Na+-spiking behavior as well as key dendritic active properties, including Ca2+ spikes and back-propagating action potentials, are still lacking. Based on a large body of experimental recordings from both the soma and dendrites of L5b pyramidal cells in adult rats, we characterized key features of the somatic and dendritic firing and quantified their statistics. We used these features to constrain the density of a set of ion channels over the soma and dendritic surface via multi-objective optimization with an evolutionary algorithm, thus generating a set of detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the back-propagating action potential activated Ca2+ spike firing and the perisomatic firing response to current steps, as well as the experimental variability of the properties. ... The models we present provide several experimentally-testable predictions and can serve as a powerful tool for theoretical investigations of the contribution of single-cell dynamics to network activity and its computational capabilities. "
Large scale model of the olfactory bulb (Yu et al., 2013)
The readme file currently contains links to the results for all the 72 odors investigated in the paper, and the movie showing the network activity during learning of odor k3-3 (an aliphatic ketone).
Lateral dendrodenditic inhibition in the Olfactory Bulb (David et al. 2008)
Mitral cells, the principal output neurons of the olfactory bulb, receive direct synaptic activation from primary sensory neurons. Shunting inhibitory inputs delivered by granule cell interneurons onto mitral cell lateral dendrites are believed to influence spike timing and underlie coordinated field potential oscillations. Lateral dendritic shunt conductances delayed spiking to a degree dependent on both their electrotonic distance and phase of onset. Recurrent inhibition significantly narrowed the distribution of mitral cell spike times, illustrating a tendency towards coordinated synchronous activity. This result suggests an essential role for early mechanisms of temporal coordination in olfaction. The model was adapted from Davison et al, 2003, but include additional noise mechanisms, long lateral dendrite, and specific synaptic point processes.
Linear vs non-linear integration in CA1 oblique dendrites (Gómez González et al. 2011)
The hippocampus in well known for its role in learning and memory processes. The CA1 region is the output of the hippocampal formation and pyramidal neurons in this region are the elementary units responsible for the processing and transfer of information to the cortex. Using this detailed single neuron model, it is investigated the conditions under which individual CA1 pyramidal neurons process incoming information in a complex (non-linear) as opposed to a passive (linear) manner. This detailed compartmental model of a CA1 pyramidal neuron is based on one described previously (Poirazi, 2003). The model was adapted to five different reconstructed morphologies for this study, and slightly modified to fit the experimental data of (Losonczy, 2006), and to incorporate evidence in pyramidal neurons for the non-saturation of NMDA receptor-mediated conductances by single glutamate pulses. We first replicate the main findings of (Losonczy, 2006), including the very brief window for nonlinear integration using single-pulse stimuli. We then show that double-pulse stimuli increase a CA1 pyramidal neuron’s tolerance for input asynchrony by at last an order of magnitude. Therefore, it is shown using this model, that the time window for nonlinear integration is extended by more than an order of magnitude when inputs are short bursts as opposed to single spikes.
Mechanisms of fast rhythmic bursting in a layer 2/3 cortical neuron (Traub et al 2003)
This simulation is based on the reference paper listed below.

This port was made by Roger D Traub and Maciej T Lazarewicz (mlazarew@seas.upenn.edu) Thanks to Ashlen P Reid for help with porting a morphology of the cell.

Membrane potential changes in dendritic spines during APs and synaptic input (Palmer & Stuart 2009)
" ... Finally, we used simulations of our experimental observations in morphologically realistic models to estimate spine neck resistance. These simulations indicated that spine neck resistance ranges up to ~500 M Ohm. Spine neck resistances of this magnitude reduce somatic EPSPs by ~15%, indicating that the spine neck is unlikely to act as a physical device to significantly modify synaptic strength."
Motoneuron model of self-sustained firing after spinal cord injury (Kurian et al. 2011)
" ... During the acute-stage of spinal cord injury (SCI), the endogenous ability to generate plateaus is lost; however, during the chronic-stage of SCI, plateau potentials reappear with prolonged self-sustained firing that has been implicated in the development of spasticity. In this work, we extend previous modeling studies to systematically investigate the mechanisms underlying the generation of plateau potentials in motoneurons, including the influences of specific ionic currents, the morphological characteristics of the soma and dendrite, and the interactions between persistent inward currents and synaptic input. ..."
Multicompartmental cerebellar granule cell model (Diwakar et al. 2009)
A detailed multicompartmental model was used to study neuronal electroresponsiveness of cerebellar granule cells in rats. Here we show that, in cerebellar granule cells, Na+ channels are enriched in the axon, especially in the hillock, but almost absent from soma and dendrites. Numerical simulations indicated that granule cells have a compact electrotonic structure allowing EPSPs to diffuse with little attenuation from dendrites to axon. The spike arose almost simultaneously along the whole axonal ascending branch and invaded the hillock, whose activation promoted spike back-propagation with marginal delay (<200 micros) and attenuation (<20 mV) into the somato-dendritic compartment. For details check the cited article.
Na+ channel dependence of AP initiation in cortical pyramidal neuron (Kole et al. 2008)
In this simulation action potential initiation, action potential properties and the role of axon initial segment Na+ channels are investigated in a realistic model of a layer 5 pyramidal neuron axon initial segment. The main Na+ channel properties were constrained by experimental data and the axon initial segment was reconstructed. Model parameters were constrained by direct recordings at the axon initial segment.
NAcc medium spiny neuron: effects of cannabinoid withdrawal (Spiga et al. 2010)
Cannabinoid withdrawal produces a hypofunction of dopaminergic neurons targeting medium spiny neurons (MSN) of the forebrain. Administration of a CB1 receptor antagonist to control rats provoked structural abnormalities, reminiscent of those observed in withdrawal conditions and support the regulatory role of cannabinoids in neurogenesis, axonal growth and synaptogenesis. Experimental observations were incorporated into a realistic computational model which predicts a strong reduction in the excitability of morphologically-altered MSN, yielding a significant reduction in action potential output. These paper provided direct morphological evidence for functional abnormalities associated with cannabinoid dependence at the level of dopaminergic neurons and their post synaptic counterpart, supporting a hypodopaminergic state as a distinctive feature of the “addicted brain”.
Nigral dopaminergic neurons: effects of ethanol on Ih (Migliore et al. 2008)
We use a realistic computational model of dopaminergic neurons in vivo to suggest that ethanol, through its effects on Ih, modifies the temporal structure of the spiking activity. The model predicts that the dopamine level may increase much more during bursting than pacemaking activity, especially in those brain regions with a slow dopamine clearance rate. The results suggest that a selective pharmacological remedy could thus be devised against the rewarding effects of ethanol that are postulated to mediate alcohol abuse and addiction, targeting the specific HCN genes expressed in dopaminergic neurons.
Nonlinear dendritic processing in barrel cortex spiny stellate neurons (Lavzin et al. 2012)
This is a multi-compartmental simulation of a spiny stellate neuron which is stimulated by a thalamocortical (TC) and cortico-cortical (CC) inputs. No other cells are explicitly modeled; the presynaptic network activation is represented by the number of active synapses. Preferred and non –preferred thalamic directions thus correspond to larder/smaller number of TC synapses. This simulation revealed that randomly activated synapses can cooperatively trigger global NMDA spikes, which involve participation of most of the dendritic tree. Surprisingly, we found that although the voltage profile of the cell was uniform, the calcium influx was restricted to ‘hot spots’ which correspond to synaptic clusters or large conductance synapses
Olfactory bulb granule cell: effects of odor deprivation (Saghatelyan et al 2005)
The model supports the experimental findings on the effects of postnatal odor deprivation, and shows that a -10mV shift in the Na activation or a reduction in the dendritic length of newborn GC could independently explain the observed increase in excitability.
Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell column formation (Migliore et al. 2007)
In the olfactory bulb, the processing units for odor discrimination are believed to involve dendrodendritic synaptic interactions between mitral and granule cells. There is increasing anatomical evidence that these cells are organized in columns, and that the columns processing a given odor are arranged in widely distributed arrays. Experimental evidence is lacking on the underlying learning mechanisms for how these columns and arrays are formed. We have used a simplified realistic circuit model to test the hypothesis that distributed connectivity can self-organize through an activity-dependent dendrodendritic synaptic mechanism. The results point to action potentials propagating in the mitral cell lateral dendrites as playing a critical role in this mechanism, and suggest a novel and robust learning mechanism for the development of distributed processing units in a cortical structure.
Olfactory bulb mitral and granule cell: dendrodendritic microcircuits (Migliore and Shepherd 2008)
This model shows how backpropagating action potentials in the long lateral dendrites of mitral cells, together with granule cell actions on mitral cells within narrow columns forming glomerular units, can provide a mechanism to activate strong local inhibition between arbitrarily distant mitral cells. The simulations predict a new role for the dendrodendritic synapses in the multicolumnar organization of the granule cells.
Olfactory bulb mitral cell gap junction NN model: burst firing and synchrony (O`Connor et al. 2012)
In a network of 6 mitral cells connected by gap junction in the apical dendrite tuft, continuous current injections of 0.06 nA are injected into 20 locations in the apical tufts of two of the mitral cells. The current injections into one of the cells starts 10 ms after the other to generate asynchronous firing in the cells (Migliore et al. 2005 protocol). Firing of the cells is asynchronous for the first 120 ms. However after the burst firing phase is completed the firing in all cells becomes synchronous.
Olfactory bulb mitral cell: synchronization by gap junctions (Migliore et al 2005)
In a realistic model of two electrically connected mitral cells, the paper shows that the somatically-measured experimental properties of Gap Junctions (GJs) may correspond to a variety of different local coupling strengths and dendritic distributions of GJs in the tuft. The model suggests that the propagation of the GJ-induced local tuft depolarization is a major mechanim for intraglomerular synchronization of mitral cells.
Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule cell circuits (Migliore & McTavish 2013)
Model files for the entry "Olfactory Computations in Mitral-Granule Cell Circuits" of the Springer Encyclopedia of Computational Neuroscience by Michele Migliore and Tom Mctavish. The simulations illustrate two typical Mitral-Granule cell circuits in the olfactory bulb of vertebrates: distance-independent lateral inhibition and gating effects.
Olfactory Mitral Cell (Shen et al 1999)
Mitral cell model with standard parameters for the paper: Shen, G.Y., Chen, W. R., Midtgaard, J., Shepherd, G.M., and Hines, M.L. (1999) Computational Analysis of Action Potential Initiation in Mitral Cell Soma and Dendrites Based on Dual Patch Recordings. Journal of Neurophysiology 82:3006. Contact Michael.Hines@yale.edu if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
Principles of Computational Modelling in Neuroscience (Book) (Sterratt et al. 2011)
"... This book provides a step-by-step account of how to model the neuron and neural circuitry to understand the nervous system at all levels, from ion channels to networks. Starting with a simple model of the neuron as an electrical circuit, gradually more details are added to include the effects of neuronal morphology, synapses, ion channels and intracellular signaling. The principle of abstraction is explained through chapters on simplifying models, and how simplified models can be used in networks. This theme is continued in a final chapter on modeling the development of the nervous system. Requiring an elementary background in neuroscience and some high school mathematics, this textbook is an ideal basis for a course on computational neuroscience."
Pyramidal Neuron Deep, Superficial; Aspiny, Stellate (Mainen and Sejnowski 1996)
This package contains compartmental models of four reconstructed neocortical neurons (layer 3 Aspiny, layer 4 Stellate, layer 3 and layer 5 Pyramidal neurons) with active dendritic currents using NEURON. Running this simulation demonstrates that an entire spectrum of firing patterns can be reproduced in this set of model neurons which share a common distribution of ion channels and differ only in their dendritic geometry. The reference paper is: Z. F. Mainen and T. J. Sejnowski (1996) Influence of dendritic structure on firing pattern in model neocortical neurons. Nature 382: 363-366. See also http://www.cnl.salk.edu/~zach/methods.html and http://www.cnl.salk.edu/~zach/ More info in readme.txt file below made visible by clicking on the patdemo folder and then on the readme.txt file.
Roles of I(A) and morphology in AP prop. in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites (Acker and White 2007)
" ...Using conductance-based models of CA1 pyramidal cells, we show that underlying “traveling wave attractors” control action potential propagation in the apical dendrites. By computing these attractors, we dissect and quantify the effects of IA channels and dendritic morphology on bAP amplitudes. We find that non-uniform activation properties of IA can lead to backpropagation failure similar to that observed experimentally in these cells. ... "
Salamander retinal ganglian cells: morphology influences firing (Sheasby, Fohlmeister 1999)
Nerve impulse entrainment and other excitation and passive phenomena are analyzed for a morphologically diverse and exhaustive data set (n=57) of realistic (3-dimensional computer traced) soma-dendritic tree structures of ganglion cells in the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina.
Self-influencing synaptic plasticity (Tamosiunaite et al. 2007)
"... Similar to a previous study (Saudargiene et al., 2004) we employ a differential Hebbian learning rule to emulate spike-timing dependent plasticity and investigate how the interaction of dendritic and back-propagating spikes, as the post-synaptic signals, could influence plasticity. ..."
Signal integration in a CA1 pyramidal cell (Graham 2001)
This model investigates signal integration in the dendritic tree of a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell when different combinations of active channels are present in the tree (Graham, 2001)
Spectral method and high-order finite differences for nonlinear cable (Omurtag and Lytton 2010)
We use high-order approximation schemes for the space derivatives in the nonlinear cable equation and investigate the behavior of numerical solution errors by using exact solutions, where available, and grid convergence. The space derivatives are numerically approximated by means of differentiation matrices. A flexible form for the injected current is used that can be adjusted smoothly from a very broad to a narrow peak, which leads, for the passive cable, to a simple, exact solution. We provide comparisons with exact solutions in an unbranched passive cable, the convergence of solutions with progressive refinement of the grid in an active cable, and the simulation of spike initiation in a biophysically realistic single-neuron model.
Spike Initiation in Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons (Mainen et al 1995)
This model reproduces figure 3A from the paper Mainen ZF, Joerges J, Huguenard JR, Sejnowski TJ (1995). Please see the paper for detail whose full text is available at http://www.cnl.salk.edu/~zach/methods.html Email Zach Mainen for questions: mainen@cshl.org
Spike propagation in dendrites with stochastic ion channels (Diba et al. 2006))
"We investigate the effects of the stochastic nature of ion channels on the faithfulness, precision and reproducibility of electrical signal transmission in weakly active, dendritic membrane under in vitro conditions. ... We numerically simulate the effects of stochastic ion channels on the forward and backward propagation of dendritic spikes in Monte-Carlo simulations on a reconstructed layer 5 pyramidal neuron. We report that in most instances there is little variation in timing or amplitude for a single BPAP, while variable backpropagation can occur for trains of action potentials. Additionally, we find that the generation and forward propagation of dendritic Ca2+ spikes are susceptible to channel variability. This indicates limitations on computations that depend on the precise timing of Ca2+ spikes."
Spinal Motor Neuron (Dodge, Cooley 1973)
Dodge & Cooley (1973) "Action Potential of the Motorneuron" IBM J. Res. Develop. May 219--229
Spine fusion and branching effects synaptic response (Rusakov et al 1996, 1997)
This compartmental model of a hippocampal granule cell has spinous synapses placed on the second-order dendrites. Changes in shape and connectivity of the spines usually does not effect the synaptic response of the cell unless active conductances are incorporated into the spine membrane (e.g. voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels). With active conductances, spines can generate spike-like events. We showed that changes like fusion and branching, or in fact any increase in the equivalent spine neck resistance, could trigger a dramatic increase in the spine's influence on the dendritic shaft potential.
STDP depends on dendritic synapse location (Letzkus et al. 2006)
This model was published in Letzkus, Kampa & Stuart (2006) J Neurosci 26(41):10420-9. The simulation creates several plots showing voltage and NMDA current and conductance changes at different apical dendritic locations in layer 5 pyramidal neurons during STDP induction protocols. Created by B. Kampa (2006).
Stochastic 3D model of neonatal rat spinal motoneuron (Ostroumov 2007)
" ... Although existing models of motoneurons have indicated the distributed role of certain conductances in regulating firing, it is unclear how the spatial distribution of certain currents is ultimately shaping motoneuron output. Thus, it would be helpful to build a bridge between histological and electrophysiological data. The present report is based on the construction of a 3D motoneuron model based on available parameters applicable to the neonatal spinal cord. ..."
Stochastic calcium mechanisms cause dendritic calcium spike variability (Anwar et al. 2013)
" ... In single Purkinje cells, spontaneous and synaptically evoked dendritic calcium bursts come in a variety of shapes with a variable number of spikes. The mechanisms causing this variability have never been investigated thoroughly. In this study, a detailed computational model employing novel simulation routines is applied to identify the roles that stochastic ion channels, spatial arrangements of ion channels and stochastic intracellular calcium have towards producing calcium burst variability. … Our findings suggest that stochastic intracellular calcium mechanisms play a crucial role in dendritic calcium spike generation and are, therefore, an essential consideration in studies of neuronal excitability and plasticity."
Stochastic Ih and Na-channels in pyramidal neuron dendrites (Kole et al 2006)
The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) plays an important role in regulating neuronal excitability, yet its native single-channel properties in the brain are essentially unknown. Here we use variance-mean analysis to study the properties of single Ih channels in the apical dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons in vitro. ... In contrast to the uniformly distributed single-channel conductance, Ih channel number increases exponentially with distance, reaching densities as high as approximately 550 channels/microm2 at distal dendritic sites. These high channel densities generate significant membrane voltage noise. By incorporating a stochastic model of Ih single-channel gating into a morphologically realistic model of a layer 5 neuron, we show that this channel noise is higher in distal dendritic compartments and increased threefold with a 10-fold increased single-channel conductance (6.8 pS) but constant Ih current density. ... These data suggest that, in the face of high current densities, the small single-channel conductance of Ih is critical for maintaining the fidelity of action potential output. See paper for more and details.
Synaptic integration in tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Larkum et al. 2009)
Simulations used in the paper. Voltage responses to current injections in different tuft locations; NMDA and calcium spike generation. Summation of multiple input distribution.
Thalamic reticular neurons: the role of Ca currents (Destexhe et al 1996)
The experiments and modeling reported in this paper show how intrinsic bursting properties of RE cells may be explained by dendritic calcium currents.
Theta phase precession in a model CA3 place cell (Baker and Olds 2007)
"... The present study concerns a neurobiologically based computational model of the emergence of theta phase precession in which the responses of a single model CA3 pyramidal cell are examined in the context of stimulation by realistic afferent spike trains including those of place cells in entorhinal cortex, dentate gyrus, and other CA3 pyramidal cells. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the model CA3 pyramidal cell leads to a spatially correlated associational synaptic drive that subsequently creates a spatially asymmetric expansion of the model cell’s place field. ... Through selective manipulations of the model it is possible to decompose theta phase precession in CA3 into the separate contributing factors of inheritance from upstream afferents in the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex, the interaction of synaptically controlled increasing afferent drive with phasic inhibition, and the theta phase difference between dentate gyrus granule cell and CA3 pyramidal cell activity."
Transfer properties of Neuronal Dendrites (Korogod et al 1998)
The somatopetal current transfer was studied in mathematical models of a reconstructed brainstem motoneuron with tonically activated excitatory synaptic inputs uniformly distributed over the dendritic arborization. See paper and below readme.txt for more information.
Using Strahler’s analysis to reduce realistic models (Marasco et al, 2013)
Building on our previous work (Marasco et al., (2012)), we present a general reduction method based on Strahler's analysis of neuron morphologies. We show that, without any fitting or tuning procedures, it is possible to map any morphologically and biophysically accurate neuron model into an equivalent reduced version. Using this method for Purkinje cells, we demonstrate how run times can be reduced up to 200-fold, while accurately taking into account the effects of arbitrarily located and activated synaptic inputs. Reference: Marasco A, Limongiello A, & Migliore M (2013), Using Strahler’s analysis to reduce up to 200-fold the run time of realistic neuron models, Sci. Rep. 3, 2934; DOI:10.1038/srep02934 in press.
Visual Cortex Neurons: Dendritic computations (Archie, Mel 2000)
Neuron and C program files from Archie, K.A. and Mel, B.W. A model of intradendritic computation of binocular disparity. Nature Neuroscience 3:54-63, 2000 The original files for this model are located at the web site
Visual Cortex Neurons: Dendritic study (Anderson et al 1999)
Neuron mod and hoc files for the paper: Anderson, J.C. Binzegger, T., Kahana, O., Segev, I., and Martin, K.A.C Dendritic asymmetry cannot account for directional responses in visual cortex. Nature Neuroscience 2:820:824, 1999
Voltage attenuation in CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites (Golding et al 2005)
Voltage attenuation in the apical dendritic field of CA1 pyramidal neurons is particularly strong for epsps spreading toward the soma. High cytoplasmic resistivity and high membrane (leak) conductance appear to be the major determinants of voltage attenuation over most of the apical field, but H current may be responsible for as much as half of the attenuation of distal apical epsps.


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