Models that contain the Cell : Neostriatum fast spiking interneuron

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    Models   Description
1. A contracting model of the basal ganglia (Girard et al. 2008)
Basal ganglia model : selection processes between channels, dynamics controlled by contraction analysis, rate-coding model of neurons based on locally projected dynamical systems (lPDS).
2. Biologically Constrained Basal Ganglia model (BCBG model) (Lienard, Girard 2014)
We studied the physiology and function of the basal ganglia through the design of mean-field models of the whole basal ganglia. The parameterizations are optimized with multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to respect best a collection of numerous anatomical data and electrophysiological data. The main outcomes of our study are: • The strength of the GPe to GPi/SNr connection does not support opposed activities in the GPe and GPi/SNr. • STN and MSN target more the GPe than the GPi/SNr. • Selection arises from the structure of the basal ganglia, without properly segregated direct and indirect pathways and without specific inputs from pyramidal tract neurons of the cortex. Selection is enhanced when the projection from GPe to GPi/SNr has a diffuse pattern.
3. Cortical model with reinforcement learning drives realistic virtual arm (Dura-Bernal et al 2015)
We developed a 3-layer sensorimotor cortical network of consisting of 704 spiking model-neurons, including excitatory, fast-spiking and low-threshold spiking interneurons. Neurons were interconnected with AMPA/NMDA, and GABAA synapses. We trained our model using spike-timing-dependent reinforcement learning to control a virtual musculoskeletal human arm, with realistic anatomical and biomechanical properties, to reach a target. Virtual arm position was used to simultaneously control a robot arm via a network interface.
4. Firing patterns in stuttering fast-spiking interneurons (Klaus et al. 2011)
This is a morphologically extended version of the fast-spiking interneuron by Golomb et al. (2007). The model captures the stuttering firing pattern and subthreshold oscillations in response to step current input as observed in many cortical and striatal fast-spiking cells.
5. Gap junction coupled network of striatal fast spiking interneurons (Hjorth et al. 2009)
Gap junctions between striatal FS neurons has very weak ability to synchronise spiking. Input uncorrelated between neighbouring neurons is shunted, while correlated input is not.
6. Pallidostriatal projections promote beta oscillations (Corbit, Whalen, et al 2016)
This model consists of an inhibitory loop combining the projections from GPe neurons back to the striatum (shown experimentally to predominantly affect fast spiking interneurons, FSIs), together with the coupling from FSIs to medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum, along with the projections from MSNs to GPe. All models are in the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism, adapted from previously published models for each cell type. The connected circuit produces irregular activity under control conditions, but increasing FSI-to-MSN connectivity as observed experimentally under dopamine depletion yields exaggerated beta oscillations and synchrony. Additional mechanistic aspects are also explored.
7. Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
8. Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.
9. Striatal NN model of MSNs and FSIs investigated effects of dopamine depletion (Damodaran et al 2015)
This study investigates the mechanisms that are affected in the striatal network after dopamine depletion and identifies potential therapeutic targets to restore normal activity.
10. Synchronicity of fast-spiking interneurons balances medium-spiny neurons (Damodaran et al. 2014)
This study investigates the role of feedforward and feedback inhibition in maintaining the balance between D1 and D2 MSNs of the striatum. The synchronized firing of FSIs are found to be critical in this mechanism and specifically the gap junction connections between FSIs.

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