Models that contain the Model Concept : Evoked LFP

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    Models   Description
1.  A model of local field potentials generated by medial superior olive neurons (Goldwyn et al 2014)
A computational model of local field potentials generated by medial superior olive neurons. These field potentials are known as the "auditory neurophonic". MSO neuron is modeled as a soma and two dendrites (following Mathews et al, Nature Neurosci, 2010). Intracellular and a 1D extracellular domain are dynamically coupled and solved to simulate spatial-temporal patterns of membrane voltage and extracellular voltage in response to trains of synaptic inputs (monolateral or bilateral, excitation and/or inhibition). The model produces spatio-temporal patterns similar to neurophonic responses recorded in vivo, as discussed in the accompanying manuscript.
2.  Deconstruction of cortical evoked potentials generated by subthalamic DBS (Kumaravelu et al 2018)
"... High frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) suppresses parkinsonian motor symptoms and modulates cortical activity. ... Cortical evoked potentials (cEP) generated by STN DBS reflect the response of cortex to subcortical stimulation, and the goal was to determine the neural origin of cEP using a two-step approach. First, we recorded cEP over ipsilateral primary motor cortex during different frequencies of STN DBS in awake healthy and unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned parkinsonian rats. Second, we used a biophysically-based model of the thalamocortical network to deconstruct the neural origin of the cEP. The in vivo cEP included short (R1), intermediate (R2) and long-latency (R3) responses. Model-based cortical responses to simulated STN DBS matched remarkably well the in vivo responses. R1 was generated by antidromic activation of layer 5 pyramidal neurons, while recurrent activation of layer 5 pyramidal neurons via excitatory axon collaterals reproduced R2. R3 was generated by polysynaptic activation of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons via the cortico-thalamic-cortical pathway. Antidromic activation of the hyperdirect pathway and subsequent intracortical and cortico-thalamo-cortical synaptic interactions were sufficient to generate cEP by STN DBS, and orthodromic activation through basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex pathways was not required. These results demonstrate the utility of cEP to determine the neural elements activated by STN DBS that might modulate cortical activity and contribute to the suppression of parkinsonian symptoms."
3.  Engaging distinct oscillatory neocortical circuits (Vierling-Claassen et al. 2010)
"Selective optogenetic drive of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons (INs) leads to enhanced local field potential (LFP) power across the traditional “gamma” frequency band (20–80 Hz; Cardin et al., 2009). In contrast, drive to regular-spiking (RS) pyramidal cells enhances power at lower frequencies, with a peak at 8 Hz. The first result is consistent with previous computational studies emphasizing the role of FS and the time constant of GABAA synaptic inhibition in gamma rhythmicity. However, the same theoretical models do not typically predict low-frequency LFP enhancement with RS drive. To develop hypotheses as to how the same network can support these contrasting behaviors, we constructed a biophysically principled network model of primary somatosensory neocortex containing FS, RS, and low-threshold spiking (LTS) INs. ..."
4.  Ephaptic coupling in passive cable and MSO neuron models (Goldwyn & Rinzel 2016)
Simulation code to explore how the synchronous activity of a bundle of neurons generates extracellular voltage, and how this extracellular voltage influences the membrane potential of "nearby" neurons. A non-synaptic mechanism known as ephaptic coupling. A model of a passive cable population (including user-friendly matlab GUI) and a model of medial superior olive neurons are included.
5.  LFP signature of monosynaptic thalamocortical connection (Hagen et al 2017)
"A resurgence has taken place in recent years in the use of the extracellularly recorded local field potential (LFP) to investigate neural network activity. To probe monosynaptic thalamic activation of cortical postsynaptic target cells, so called spike-trigger-averaged LFP (stLFP) signatures have been measured. In these experiments, the cortical LFP is measured by multielectrodes covering several cortical lamina and averaged on spontaneous spikes of thalamocortical (TC) cells. Using a well established forward-modeling scheme, we investigated the biophysical origin of this stLFP signature with simultaneous synaptic activation of cortical layer-4 neurons, mimicking the effect of a single afferent spike from a single TC neuron. ..."
6.  Modeling conductivity profiles in the deep neocortical pyramidal neuron (Wang K et al. 2013)
"With the rapid increase in the number of technologies aimed at observing electric activity inside the brain, scientists have felt the urge to create proper links between intracellular- and extracellular-based experimental approaches. Biophysical models at both physical scales have been formalized under assumptions that impede the creation of such links. In this work, we address this issue by proposing amulticompartment model that allows the introduction of complex extracellular and intracellular resistivity profiles. This model accounts for the geometrical and electrotonic properties of any type of neuron through the combination of four devices: the integrator, the propagator, the 3D connector, and the collector. ..."
7.  Reconstructing cerebellar granule layer evoked LFP using convolution (ReConv) (Diwakar et al. 2011)
The model allows reconstruction of evoked local field potentials as seen in the cerebellar granular layer. The approach uses a detailed model of cerebellar granule neuron to generate data traces and then uses a "ReConv" or jittered repetitive convolution technique to reproduce post-synaptic local field potentials in the granular layer. The algorithm was used to generate both in vitro and in vivo evoked LFP and reflected the changes seen during LTP and LTD, when such changes were induced in the underlying neurons by modulating release probability of synapses and sodium channel regulated intrinsic excitability of the cells.
8.  Simulations of oscillations in piriform cortex (Wilson & Bower 1992)
"1. A large-scale computer model of the piriform cortex was constructed on the basis of the known anatomic and physiological organization of this region. 2. The oscillatory field potential and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity generated by the model was compared with actual physiological results. The model was able to produce patterns of activity similar to those recorded physiologically in response to both weak and strong electrical shocks to the afferent input. The model also generated activity patterns similar to EEGs recorded in behaving animals. 3. ..."
9.  Theoretical reconstrucion of field potentials and dendrodendritic synaptic...(Rall & Shepherd 1968)
This was the first application of compartmental modeling using the Rall approach to brain neurons. It combined multicompartmental representation of a mitral cell and a granule cell with the first Hodgkin-Huxley-like action potential to model antidromic activation of the mitral cell, followed by synaptic excitation of the granule cell and synaptic inhibition of the mitral cell. Combined with reconstruction of the field potentials generated around these neurons, and detailed comparisons with single cell recordings, it led to prediction of dendrodendritic interactions mediating self and lateral inhibition of the mitral cells by the granule cells. It has been regarded as the first computational model of a brain microcircuit (see also Shepherd and Brayton, 1979). Recreation of the model is pending.

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