Models that contain the Modeling Application : Mathematica (Home Page)

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    Models   Description
1.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: depolarization block (Bianchi et al. 2012)
NEURON files from the paper: On the mechanisms underlying the depolarization block in the spiking dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neurons by D.Bianchi, A. Marasco, A.Limongiello, C.Marchetti, H.Marie,B.Tirozzi, M.Migliore (2012). J Comput. Neurosci. In press. DOI: 10.1007/s10827-012-0383-y. Experimental findings shown that under sustained input current of increasing strength neurons eventually stop firing, entering a depolarization block. We analyze the spiking dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neuron models using the same set of ionic currents on both an accurate morphological reconstruction and on its reduction to a single-compartment. The results show the specic ion channel properties and kinetics that are needed to reproduce the experimental findings, and how their interplay can drastically modulate the neuronal dynamics and the input current range leading to depolarization block.
2.  Circadian clock model based on protein sequestration (simple version) (Kim & Forger 2012)
"… To understand the biochemical mechanisms of this timekeeping, we have developed a detailed mathematical model of the mammalian circadian clock. Our model can accurately predict diverse experimental data including the phenotypes of mutations or knockdown of clock genes as well as the time courses and relative expression of clock transcripts and proteins. Using this model, we show how a universal motif of circadian timekeeping, where repressors tightly bind activators rather than directly binding to DNA, can generate oscillations when activators and repressors are in stoichiometric balance. …"
3.  Circadian clock model in mammals (detailed version) (Kim & Forger 2012)
"… To understand the biochemical mechanisms of this timekeeping, we have developed a detailed mathematical model of the mammalian circadian clock. Our model can accurately predict diverse experimental data including the phenotypes of mutations or knockdown of clock genes as well as the time courses and relative expression of clock transcripts and proteins. Using this model, we show how a universal motif of circadian timekeeping, where repressors tightly bind activators rather than directly binding to DNA, can generate oscillations when activators and repressors are in stoichiometric balance. …"
4.  Circadian clock model in mammals (PK/PD model) (Kim & Forger 2013)
A systems pharmacology model of the mammalian circadian clock including PF-670462 (CK1d/e inhibitor).
5.  Continuous lateral oscillations as a mechanism for taxis in Drosophila larvae (Wystrach et al 2016)
" ...Our analysis of larvae motion reveals a rhythmic, continuous lateral oscillation of the anterior body, encompassing all head-sweeps, small or large, without breaking the oscillatory rhythm. Further, we show that an agent-model that embeds this hypothesis reproduces a surprising number of taxis signatures observed in larvae. Also, by coupling the sensory input to a neural oscillator in continuous time, we show that the mechanism is robust and biologically plausible. ..."
6.  Optimal synaptic assignment for locomotory behavior in C. elegans (Rakowski & Karbowski 2017)
"The detailed knowledge of C. elegans connectome for 3 decades has not contributed dramatically to our understanding of worm’s behavior. One of main reasons for this situation has been the lack of data on the type of synaptic signaling between particular neurons in the worm’s connectome. The aim of this study was to determine synaptic polarities for each connection in a small pre-motor circuit controlling locomotion. Even in this compact network of just 7 neurons the space of all possible patterns of connection types (excitation vs. inhibition) is huge. To deal effectively with this combinatorial problem we devised a novel and relatively fast technique based on genetic algorithms and large-scale parallel computations, which we combined with detailed neurophysiological modeling of interneuron dynamics and compared the theory to the available behavioral data. As a result of these massive computations, we found that the optimal connectivity pattern that matches the best locomotory data is the one in which all interneuron connections are inhibitory, even those terminating on motor neurons. ..."
7.  Synchronized oscillations of clock gene expression in the choroid plexus (Myung et al 2018)
Our model simulates synchronized rhythms in the clock gene expression found in the choroid plexus. These synchronized oscillations, primarily mediated by gap junctions, showed interesting relationships between their amplitude, oscillation frequency, and coupling strength (gap junction density) in our experimental data. The model is based on coupled Poincaré oscillators and replicates this phenomenon via a non-zero "twist" in each cell.
8.  Thalamic neuron, zebra finch DLM: Integration of pallidal and cortical inputs (Goldberg et al. 2012)
This is a single-compartment model of a zebra finch thalamic relay neuron from nucleus DLM. It is used to explore the interaction between cortex-like glutamatergic input and pallidum-like GABAergic input as they control the spiking output of these neurons.

Re-display model names without descriptions