Models that contain the Region : Prefrontal cortex (PFC)

(The most evolved part of the brain. Implicated in control of thoughts and actions (dorsal lateral, dlPFC) and the control of emotions and habits (ventral medial, vmPFC).)
Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  A detailed data-driven network model of prefrontal cortex (Hass et al 2016)
Data-based PFC-like circuit with layer 2/3 and 5, synaptic clustering, four types of interneurons and cell-type specific short-term synaptic plasticity; neuron parameters fitted to in vitro data, all other parameters constrained by experimental literature. Reproduces key features of in vivo resting state activity without specific tuning.
2.  Borderline Personality Disorder (Berdahl, 2010)
This research developed a neural network simulation constrained by known neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to generate ideas about the etiology of Borderline Personality Disorder. The simulations suggest an important role for the amygdala-ventromedial prefrontal cortex-amygdala circuit.
3.  Effect of cortical D1 receptor sensitivity on working memory maintenance (Reneaux & Gupta 2018)
Alterations in cortical D1 receptor density and reactivity of dopamine-binding sites, collectively termed as D1 receptor-sensitivity in the present study, have been experimentally shown to affect the working memory maintenance during delay-period. However, computational models addressing the effect of D1 receptor-sensitivity are lacking. A quantitative neural mass model of the prefronto-mesoprefrontal system has been proposed to take into account the effect of variation in cortical D1 receptor-sensitivity on working memory maintenance during delay. The model computes the delay-associated equilibrium states/operational points of the system for different values of D1 receptor-sensitivity through the nullcline and bifurcation analysis. Further, to access the robustness of the working memory maintenance during delay in the presence of alteration in D1 receptor-sensitivity, numerical simulations of the stochastic formulation of the model are performed to obtain the global potential landscape of the dynamics.
4.  Effects of Guanfacine and Phenylephrine on a model of working memory (Duggins et al 2017)
"We use a spiking neural network model of working memory (WM) capable of performing the spatial delayed response task (DRT) to investigate two drugs that affect WM: guanfacine (GFC) and phenylephrine (PHE). In this model, the loss of information over time results from changes in the spiking neural activity through recurrent connections. We reproduce the standard forgetting curve and then show that this curve changes in the presence of GFC and PHE, whose application is simulated by manipulating functional, neural, and biophysical properties of the model. ... We compare our model to both electrophysiological data from neurons in monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and to behavioral evidence from monkeys performing the DRT."
5.  Emergence of Connectivity Motifs in Networks of Model Neurons (Vasilaki, Giugliano 2014)
Recent evidence suggests that short-term dynamics of excitatory synaptic transmission is correlated to stereotypical connectivity motifs. We show that these connectivity motifs emerge in networks of model neurons, from the interactions between short-term synaptic dynamics (SD) and long-term spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP).
6.  Fast Spiking Basket cells (Tzilivaki et al 2019)
"Interneurons are critical for the proper functioning of neural circuits. While often morphologically complex, dendritic integration and its role in neuronal output have been ignored for decades, treating interneurons as linear point neurons. Exciting new findings suggest that interneuron dendrites support complex, nonlinear computations: sublinear integration of EPSPs in the cerebellum, coupled to supralinear calcium accumulations and supralinear voltage integration in the hippocampus. These findings challenge the point neuron dogma and call for a new theory of interneuron arithmetic. Using detailed, biophysically constrained models, we predict that dendrites of FS basket cells in both hippocampus and mPFC come in two flavors: supralinear, supporting local sodium spikes within large-volume branches and sublinear, in small-volume branches. Synaptic activation of varying sets of these dendrites leads to somatic firing variability that cannot be explained by the point neuron reduction. Instead, a 2-stage Artificial Neural Network (ANN), with both sub- and supralinear hidden nodes, captures most of the variance. We propose that FS basket cells have substantially expanded computational capabilities sub-served by their non-linear dendrites and act as a 2-layer ANN."
7.  H-currents effect on the fluctuation of gamma/beta oscillations (Avella-Gonzalez et al., 2015)
This model was designed to study the impact of H-currents on the dynamics of cortical oscillations, and in paticular on the occurrence of high and low amplitude episodes (HAE, LAE) in network oscillations. The H-current is a slow, hyperpolarization-activated, depolarizing current that contributes to neuronal resonance and membrane potential. We characterized amplitude fluctuations in network oscillations by measuring the average durations of HAEs and LAEs, and explored how these were modulated by trains of external spikes, both in the presence and absence of H-channels. We looked at HAE duration, the frequency and power of network oscillations, and the effect of H-channels on the temporal voltage profile in single cells. We found that H-currents increased the oscillation frequency and, in combination with external spikes, representing input from areas outside the network, strongly decreased the synchrony of firing. As a consequence, the oscillation power and the duration of episodes during which the network exhibited high-amplitude oscillations were greatly reduced in the presence of H-channels.
8.  Hebbian learning in a random network for PFC modeling (Lindsay, et al. 2017)
Creates a random model that replicates the inputs and outputs of PFC cells during a complex task. Then executes Hebbian learning in the model and performs a set of analyses on the output. A portion of this model's analysis requires code from: https://github.com/brian-lau/highdim
9.  Hodgkin-Huxley model of persistent activity in PFC neurons (Winograd et al. 2008) (NEURON python)
The paper demonstrate a form of graded persistent activity activated by hyperpolarization. This phenomenon is modeled based on a slow calcium regulation of Ih, similar to that introduced earlier for thalamic neurons (see Destexhe et al., J Neurophysiol. 1996). The only difference is that the calcium signal is here provided by the high-threshold calcium current (instead of the low-threshold calcium current in thalamic neurons).
10.  Hodgkin-Huxley model of persistent activity in prefrontal cortex neurons (Winograd et al. 2008)
The paper demonstrate a form of graded persistent activity activated by hyperpolarization. This phenomenon is modeled based on a slow calcium regulation of Ih, similar to that introduced earlier for thalamic neurons (see Destexhe et al., J Neurophysiol. 1996). The only difference is that the calcium signal is here provided by the high-threshold calcium current (instead of the low-threshold calcium current in thalamic neurons).
11.  Hyperconnectivity, slow synapses in PFC mental retardation and autism model (Testa-Silva et al 2011)
The subdirectory 'matlab' contains MATLAB scripts (The Mathworks, USA) that can be used to reproduce the panels of Figures 4-5. This directory contains files to reproduce sample computer simulations presented in the 2011 paper authored by Meredith, R., Testa-Silva, G., Loebel, A., Giugliano, M., de Kock, C.; Mansvelder, H. "Hyperconnectivity and slow synapses in prefrontal cortex of a model for mental retardation and autism". ABSTRACT "... We propose that these findings are tightly linked: using a network model, we show that slower synapses are essential to counterbalance hyperconnectivity in order to maintain a dynamic range of excitatory activity. However, the slow synaptic time constants induce decreased responsiveness to low frequency stimulation, which may explain deficits in integration and information processing in attentional neuronal networks in neurodevelopmental disorders."
12.  Inhibitory control by an integral feedback signal in prefrontal cortex (Miller and Wang 2006)
The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to be critical for inhibitory control of behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we propose that inhibitory control can be instantiated by an integral signal derived from working memory, another key function of the PFC. Specifically, we assume that an integrator converts excitatory input into a graded mnemonic activity that provides an inhibitory signal (integral feedback control) to upstream afferent neurons. We demonstrate this scenario in a neuronal-network model for a temporal discrimination task... See paper for details and more.
13.  Input Fluctuations effects on f-I curves (Arsiero et al. 2007)
"... We examined in vitro frequency versus current (f-I) relationships of layer 5 (L5) pyramidal cells of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) using fluctuating stimuli. ...our results show that mPFC L5 pyramidal neurons retain an increased sensitivity to input fluctuations, whereas their sensitivity to the input mean diminishes to near zero. This implies that the discharge properties of L5 mPFC neurons are well suited to encode input fluctuations rather than input mean in their firing rates, with important consequences for information processing and stability of persistent activity at the network level."
14.  Irregular spiking in NMDA-driven prefrontal cortex neurons (Durstewitz and Gabriel 2006)
Slow N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) synaptic currents are assumed to strongly contribute to the persistently elevated firing rates observed in prefrontal cortex (PFC) during working memory. During persistent activity, spiking of many neurons is highly irregular. ... The highest interspike-interval (ISI) variability occurred in a transition regime where the subthreshold membrane potential distribution shifts from mono- to bimodality, ... Predictability within irregular ISI series was significantly higher than expected from a noise-driven linear process, indicating that it might best be described through complex (potentially chaotic) nonlinear deterministic processes. Accordingly, the phenomena observed in vitro could be reproduced in purely deterministic biophysical model neurons. High spiking irregularity in these models emerged within a chaotic, close-to-bifurcation regime characterized by a shift of the membrane potential distribution from mono- to bimodality and by similar ISI return maps as observed in vitro. ... NMDA-induced irregular dynamics may have important implications for computational processes during working memory and neural coding.
15.  L5 PFC pyramidal neurons (Papoutsi et al. 2017)
" ... Here, we use a modeling approach to investigate whether and how the morphology of the basal tree mediates the functional output of neurons. We implemented 57 basal tree morphologies of layer 5 prefrontal pyramidal neurons of the rat and identified morphological types which were characterized by different response features, forming distinct functional types. These types were robust to a wide range of manipulations (distribution of active ionic mechanisms, NMDA conductance, somatic and apical tree morphology or the number of activated synapses) and supported different temporal coding schemes at both the single neuron and the microcircuit level. We predict that the basal tree morphological diversity among neurons of the same class mediates their segregation into distinct functional pathways. ..."
16.  Large-scale neural model of visual short-term memory (Ulloa, Horwitz 2016; Horwitz, et al. 2005,...)
Large-scale neural model of visual short term memory embedded into a 998-node connectome. The model simulates electrical activity across neuronal populations of a number of brain regions and converts that activity into fMRI and MEG time-series. The model uses a neural simulator developed at the Brain Imaging and Modeling Section of the National Institutes of Health.
17.  MDD: the role of glutamate dysfunction on Cingulo-Frontal NN dynamics (Ramirez-Mahaluf et al 2017)
" ...Currently, no mechanistic framework describes how network dynamics, glutamate, and serotonin interact to explain MDD symptoms and treatments. Here, we built a biophysical computational model of 2 areas (vACC and dlPFC) that can switch between emotional and cognitive processing. (Major Depression Disease) MDD networks were simulated by slowing glutamate decay in vACC and demonstrated sustained vACC activation. ..."
18.  Neocortical pyramidal neuron: deep; effects of dopamine (Durstewitz et al 2000)
"... Simulated dopamine strongly enhanced high, delay-type activity but not low, spontaneous activity in the model network. Furthermore the strength of an afferent stimulation needed to disrupt delay-type activity increased with the magnitude of the dopamine-induced shifts in network parameters, making the currently active representation much more stable. Stability could be increased by dopamine-induced enhancements of the persistent Na(+) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) conductances. Stability also was enhanced by a reduction in AMPA conductances. The increase in GABA(A) conductances that occurs after stimulation of dopaminergic D1 receptors was necessary in this context to prevent uncontrolled, spontaneous switches into high-activity states (i.e., spontaneous activation of task-irrelevant representations). In conclusion, the dopamine-induced changes in the biophysical properties of intrinsic ionic and synaptic conductances conjointly acted to highly increase stability of activated representations in PFC networks and at the same time retain control over network behavior and thus preserve its ability to adequately respond to task-related stimuli. ..." See paper and references for more and details.
19.  Neural model of two-interval discrimination (Machens et al 2005)
Two-interval discrimination involves comparison of two stimuli that are presented at different times. It has three phases: loading, in which the first stimulus is perceived and stored in working memory; maintenance of working memory; decision making, in which the second stimulus is perceived and compared with the first. In behaving monkeys, each phase is associated with characteristic firing activity of neurons in the prefrontal cortex. This model implements both working memory and decision making with a mutual inhibition network that reproduces all three phases of two-interval discrimination. Machens, C.K., Romo, R., and Brody, C.D. Flexible control of mutual inhibition: a neural model of two-interval discrimination. Science 307:1121-1124, 2005.
20.  Prefrontal cortical mechanisms for goal-directed behavior (Hasselmo 2005)
".. a model of prefrontal cortex function emphasizing the influence of goal-related activity on the choice of the next motor output. ... Different neocortical minicolumns represent distinct sensory input states and distinct motor output actions. The dynamics of each minicolumn include separate phases of encoding and retrieval. During encoding, strengthening of excitatory connections forms forward and reverse associations between each state, the following action, and a subsequent state, which may include reward. During retrieval, activity spreads from reward states throughout the network. The interaction of this spreading activity with a specific input state directs selection of the next appropriate action. Simulations demonstrate how these mechanisms can guide performance in a range of goal directed tasks, and provide a functional framework for some of the neuronal responses previously observed in the medial prefrontal cortex during performance of spatial memory tasks in rats."
21.  Rhesus Monkey Layer 3 Pyramidal Neurons: V1 vs PFC (Amatrudo, Weaver et al. 2012)
Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and high-resolution 3D morphometric analyses of layer 3 pyramidal neurons in in vitro slices of monkey primary visual cortex (V1) and dorsolateral granular prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) revealed that neurons in these two brain areas possess highly distinctive structural and functional properties. ... Three-dimensional reconstructions of V1 and dlPFC neurons were incorporated into computational models containing Hodgkin-Huxley and AMPA- and GABAA-receptor gated channels. Morphology alone largely accounted for observed passive physiological properties, but led to AP firing rates that differed more than observed empirically, and to synaptic responses that opposed empirical results. Accordingly, modeling predicts that active channel conductances differ between V1 and dlPFC neurons. The unique features of V1 and dlPFC neurons are likely fundamental determinants of area-specific network behavior. The compact electrotonic arbor and increased excitability of V1 neurons support the rapid signal integration required for early processing of visual information. The greater connectivity and dendritic complexity of dlPFC neurons likely support higher level cognitive functions including working memory and planning.

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