Models that contain the Model Concept : Orientation selectivity

(The ability of a neural system (a neuron or neural network) to change it's activity level depending on the orientation of a visual stimulus.)
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    Models   Description
1.  A spiking NN for amplification of feature-selectivity with specific connectivity (Sadeh et al 2015)
The model simulates large-scale inhibition-dominated spiking networks with different degrees of recurrent specific connectivity. It shows how feature-specific connectivity leads to a linear amplification of feedforward tuning, as reported in recent electrophysiological single-neuron recordings in rodent neocortex. Moreover, feature-specific connectivity leads to the emergence of feature-selective reverberating activity, and entails pattern completion in network responses.
2.  Dendritic spikes enhance stimulus selectivity in cortical neurons in vivo (Smith et al 2013)
"Neuronal dendrites are electrically excitable: they can generate regenerative events such as dendritic spikes in response to sufficiently strong synaptic input. Although such events have been observed in many neuronal types, it is not well understood how active dendrites contribute to the tuning of neuronal output in vivo. Here we show that dendritic spikes increase the selectivity of neuronal responses to the orientation of a visual stimulus (orientation tuning). ...".
3.  Development of orientation-selective simple cell receptive fields (Rishikesh and Venkatesh, 2003)
Implementation of a computational model for the development of simple-cell receptive fields spanning the regimes before and after eye-opening. The before eye-opening period is governed by a correlation-based rule from Miller (Miller, J. Neurosci., 1994), and the post eye-opening period is governed by a self-organizing, experience-dependent dynamics derived in the reference below.
4.  Functional balanced networks with synaptic plasticity (Sadeh et al, 2015)
The model investigates the impact of learning on functional sensory networks. It uses large-scale recurrent networks of excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons equipped with synaptic plasticity. It explains enhancement of orientation selectivity and emergence of feature-specific connectivity in visual cortex of rodents during development, as reported in experiments.
5.  Mechanisms for stable, robust, and adaptive development of orientation maps (Stevens et al. 2013)
GCAL (Gain Control, Adaptation, Laterally connected). Simple but robust single-population V1 orientation map model.
6.  Microcircuits of L5 thick tufted pyramidal cells (Hay & Segev 2015)
"... We simulated detailed conductance-based models of TTCs (Layer 5 thick tufted pyramidal cells) forming recurrent microcircuits that were interconnected as found experimentally; the network was embedded in a realistic background synaptic activity. ... Our findings indicate that dendritic nonlinearities are pivotal in controlling the gain and the computational functions of TTCs microcircuits, which serve as a dominant output source for the neocortex. "
7.  Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated recurrent networks (Sadeh and Rotter, 2015)
Emergence of contrast-invariant orientation selectivity in large-scale networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons using integrate-and-fire neuron models.
8.  Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.
9.  Visual physiology of the layer 4 cortical circuit in silico (Arkhipov et al 2018)
"Despite advances in experimental techniques and accumulation of large datasets concerning the composition and properties of the cortex, quantitative modeling of cortical circuits under in-vivo-like conditions remains challenging. Here we report and publicly release a biophysically detailed circuit model of layer 4 in the mouse primary visual cortex, receiving thalamo- cortical visual inputs. The 45,000-neuron model was subjected to a battery of visual stimuli, and results were compared to published work and new in vivo experiments. ..."

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