Models that contain the Neurotransmitter : Monoamines

Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  A 1000 cell network model for Lateral Amygdala (Kim et al. 2013)
1000 Cell Lateral Amygdala model for investigation of plasticity and memory storage during Pavlovian Conditioning.
2.  A basal ganglia model of aberrant learning (Ursino et al. 2018)
A comprehensive, biologically inspired neurocomputational model of action selection in the Basal Ganglia allows simulation of dopamine induced aberrant learning in Parkinsonian subjects. In particular, the model simulates the Alternate Finger Tapping motor task as an indicator of bradykinesia.
3.  A contracting model of the basal ganglia (Girard et al. 2008)
Basal ganglia model : selection processes between channels, dynamics controlled by contraction analysis, rate-coding model of neurons based on locally projected dynamical systems (lPDS).
4.  A kinetic model of dopamine- and calcium-dependent striatal synaptic plasticity (Nakano et al. 2010)
A signaling pathway model of spines that express D1-type dopamine receptors was constructed to analyze the dynamic mechanisms of dopamine- and calcium-dependent plasticity. The model incorporated all major signaling molecules, including dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein with a molecular weight of 32 kDa (DARPP32), as well as AMPA receptor trafficking in the post-synaptic membrane. Simulations with dopamine and calcium inputs reproduced dopamine- and calcium-dependent plasticity. Further in silico experiments revealed that the positive feedback loop consisted of protein kinase A (PKA), protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), and the phosphorylation site at threonine 75 of DARPP-32 (Thr75) served as the major switch for inducing LTD and LTP. The present model elucidated the mechanisms involved in bidirectional regulation of corticostriatal synapses and will allow for further exploration into causes and therapies for dysfunctions such as drug addiction."
5.  A neural model of Parkinson`s disease (Cutsuridis and Perantonis 2006, Cutsuridis 2006, 2007)
"A neural model of neuromodulatory (dopamine) control of arm movements in Parkinson’s disease (PD) bradykinesia was recently introduced [1, 2]. The model is multi-modular consisting of a basal ganglia module capable of selecting the most appropriate motor command in a given context, a cortical module for coordinating and executing the final motor commands, and a spino-musculo-skeletal module for guiding the arm to its final target and providing proprioceptive (feedback) input of the current state of the muscle and arm to higher cortical and lower spinal centers. ... The new (extended) model [3] predicted that the reduced reciprocal disynaptic Ia inhibition in the DA depleted case doesn’t lead to the co-contraction of antagonist motor units." See below readme and papers for more and details.
6.  A systems model of Parkinson’s disease using biochemical systems theory (Sasidharakurup et al. 2017)
Major pathways involving in Parkinson's disease (PD) such as alphasynuclein aggregation, dopamine synthesis, lewy body formation, tau phosphorylation, parkin, and apoptosis were modeled using stochastic differential equations. Pathways were modeled and simulated using the biochemical pathway visualization program CellDesigner, a modeling tool for gene-regulatory and biochemical networks that support graphical notation and listing of symbols. The model allows a qualitative analysis of PD and a key signalling pathways for evaluating PD treatment conditions relating pathophysiology to molecular concentration changes recorded in experiments.
7.  A unified thalamic model of multiple distinct oscillations (Li, Henriquez and Fröhlich 2017)
We present a unified model of the thalamus that is capable of independently generating multiple distinct oscillations (delta, spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations) under different levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) modulation corresponding to different physiological conditions (deep sleep, light sleep, relaxed wakefulness and attention). The model also shows that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is state-dependent.
8.  Acetylcholine-modulated plasticity in reward-driven navigation (Zannone et al 2018)
"Neuromodulation plays a fundamental role in the acquisition of new behaviours. In previous experimental work, we showed that acetylcholine biases hippocampal synaptic plasticity towards depression, and the subsequent application of dopamine can retroactively convert depression into potentiation. We also demonstrated that incorporating this sequentially neuromodulated Spike- Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP) rule in a network model of navigation yields effective learning of changing reward locations. Here, we employ computational modelling to further characterize the effects of cholinergic depression on behaviour. We find that acetylcholine, by allowing learning from negative outcomes, enhances exploration over the action space. We show that this results in a variety of effects, depending on the structure of the model, the environment and the task. Interestingly, sequentially neuromodulated STDP also yields flexible learning, surpassing the performance of other reward-modulated plasticity rules."
9.  Altered complexity in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons (Luuk van der Velden et al. 2012)
" ... Our experimental results show that hypercomplexity of the apical dendritic tuft of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons affects neuronal excitability by reducing the amount of spike frequency adaptation. This difference in firing pattern, related to a higher dendritic complexity, was accompanied by an altered development of the afterhyperpolarization slope with successive action potentials. Our abstract and realistic neuronal models, which allowed manipulation of the dendritic complexity, showed similar effects on neuronal excitability and confirmed the impact of apical dendritic complexity. Alterations of dendritic complexity, as observed in several pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases or neurodevelopmental disorders, may thus not only affect the input to layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons but also shape their firing pattern and consequently alter the information processing in the cortex."
10.  Application of a common kinetic formalism for synaptic models (Destexhe et al 1994)
Application to AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptors is given in a book chapter. The reference paper synthesizes a comprehensive general description of synaptic transmission with Markov kinetic models. This framework is applicable to modeling ion channels, synaptic release, and all receptors. Please see the references for more details. A simple introduction to this method is given in a seperate paper Destexhe et al Neural Comput 6:14-18 , 1994). More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
11.  Basal ganglia motor function and the inverse kinematics calculation (Salimi-Badr et al 2017)
The computational model to study the possible correlation between Basal Ganglia (BG) function and solving the Inverse Kinematics (IK).
12.  Basal Ganglia motor-circuit for kinematic planning of arm movements (Salimi-Badr et al 2017)
A mathematical model of BG for kinematic planning.
13.  Basal ganglia network model of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (Hahn and McIntyre 2010)
Basal ganglia network model of parkinsonian activity and subthalamic deep brain stimulation in non-human primates from the article Instructions are provided in the README.txt file. Contact hahnp@ccf.org if you have any questions about the implementation of the model. Please include "ModelDB - BGnet" in the subject heading.
14.  Basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop model of action selection (Humphries and Gurney 2002)
We embed our basal ganglia model into a wider circuit containing the motor thalamocortical loop and thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN). Simulation of this extended model showed that the additions gave five main results which are desirable in a selection/switching mechanism. First, low salience actions (i.e. those with low urgency) could be selected. Second, the range of salience values over which actions could be switched between was increased. Third, the contrast between the selected and non-selected actions was enhanced via improved differentiation of outputs from the BG. Fourth, transient increases in the salience of a non-selected action were prevented from interrupting the ongoing action, unless the transient was of sufficient magnitude. Finally, the selection of the ongoing action persisted when a new closely matched salience action became active. The first result was facilitated by the thalamocortical loop; the rest were dependent on the presence of the TRN. Thus, we conclude that the results are consistent with these structures having clearly defined functions in action selection.
15.  Bursting in dopamine neurons (Li YX et al 1996)
"Burst firing of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta can be induced in vitro by the glutamate agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate. It has been suggested that the interburst hyperpolarization is due to Na+ extrusion by a ouabain-sensitive pump (Johnson et al. (1992) Science 258, 665-667). We formulate and explore a theoretical model, with a minimal number of currents, for this novel mechanism of burst generation. This minimal model is further developed into a more elaborate model based on observations of additional currents and hypotheses about their spatial distribution in dopaminergic neurons ... Responses of the model to a number of electrophysiological and pharmacological stimuli are consistent with known responses observed under similar conditions. ..."
16.  CA1 pyramidal cell receptor dependent cAMP dynamics (Chay et al. 2016)
We use a combination of live cell imaging and stochastic modeling of signaling pathways to investigate how noradrenergic receptor stimulation interacts with calcium to control cAMP, required for synaptic plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Our simulation results explain the mechanism whereby prior noradrenergic receptor stimulation does not enhance the subsequent NMDA stimulated cAMP elevation. Specifically, our results demonstrate the the negative feedback loop from cAMP, through PKA, to PDE4 cannot explain the results, and that switching of the noradrenergic receptor from Gs to Gi is required.
17.  Cognitive and motor cortico-basal ganglia interactions during decision making (Guthrie et al 2013)
This is a re-implementation of Guthrie et al 2013 by Topalidou and Rougier 2015. The original study investigated how multiple level action selection could be performed by the basal ganglia.
18.  Compartmental differences in cAMP signaling pathways in hippocam. CA1 pyr. cells (Luczak et al 2017)
Model of cAMP signaling pathways in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons investigate mechanisms underlying the experimentally observed difference in cAMP and PKA FRET between proximal and distal dendrites. Simulations show that compartmental difference in PKA activity required enrichment of protein phosphatase in small compartments; neither reduced PKA subunits nor increased PKA substrates were sufficient.
19.  Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
20.  Computational endophenotypes in addiction (Fiore et al 2018)
"... here we simulated phenotypic variations in addiction symptomology and responses to putative treatments, using both a neural model, based on cortico-striatal circuit dynamics, and an algorithmic model of reinforcement learning. These simulations rely on the widely accepted assumption that both the ventral, model-based, goal-directed system and the dorsal, model-free, habitual system are vulnerable to extra-physiologic dopamine reinforcements triggered by addictive rewards. We found that endophenotypic differences in the balance between the two circuit or control systems resulted in an inverted U-shape in optimal choice behavior. Specifically, greater unbalance led to a higher likelihood of developing addiction and more severe drug-taking behaviors. ..."
21.  Control of vibrissa motoneuron firing (Harish and Golomb 2010)
We construct and analyze a single-compartment, conductance-based model of vibrissa motoneurons. Low firing rates are supported in extended regimes by adaptation currents and the minimal firing rate decreases with the persistent sodium conductance gNaP and increases with M-potassium and h-cation conductances. Suprathreshold resonance results from the locking properties of vMN firing to stimuli and from reduction of firing rates at low frequencies by slow M and afterhyperpolarization potassium conductances. h conductance only slightly affects the suprathreshold resonance. When a vMN is subjected to a small periodic CPG input, serotonergically induced gNaP elevation may transfer the system from quiescence to a firing state that is highly locked to the CPG input.
22.  Cortico-striatal plasticity in medium spiny neurons (Gurney et al 2015)
In the associated paper (Gurney et al, PLoS Biology, 2015) we presented a computational framework that addresses several issues in cortico-striatal plasticity including spike timing, reward timing, dopamine level, and dopamine receptor type. Thus, we derived a complete model of dopamine and spike-timing dependent cortico-striatal plasticity from in vitro data. We then showed this model produces the predicted activity changes necessary for learning and extinction in an operant task. Moreover, we showed the complex dependencies of cortico-striatal plasticity are not only sufficient but necessary for learning and extinction. The model was validated in a wider setting of action selection in basal ganglia, showing how it could account for behavioural data describing extinction, renewal, and reacquisition, and replicate in vitro experimental data on cortico-striatal plasticity. The code supplied here allows reproduction of the proposed process of learning in medium spiny neurons, giving the results of Figure 7 of the paper.
23.  Dopamine activation of signaling pathways in a medium spiny projection neuron (Oliveira et al. 2012)
Large scale stochastic reaction-diffusion model of signaling pathways in a medium spiny projection neuron dendrite with spines to investigate whether the critical function of anchoring is to locate PKA near the cAMP that activates it or near its targets, such as AMPA receptors located in the post-synaptic density. Simulations, implemented in NeuroRD, show that PKA colocalization with adenylate cyclase, either in the spine head or in the dendrite, leads to greater phosphorylation of DARPP-32 Thr34 and AMPA receptor GluA1 Ser845 than when PKA is anchored away from adenylate cyclase.
24.  Dopamine-modulated medium spiny neuron, reduced model (Humphries et al. 2009)
We extended Izhikevich's reduced model of the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) to account for dopaminergic modulation of its intrinsic ion channels and synaptic inputs. We tuned our D1 and D2 receptor MSN models using data from a recent (Moyer et al, 2007) large-scale compartmental model. Our new models capture the input-output relationships for both current injection and spiking input with remarkable accuracy, despite the order of magnitude decrease in system size. They also capture the paired pulse facilitation shown by MSNs. Our dopamine models predict that synaptic effects dominate intrinsic effects for all levels of D1 and D2 receptor activation. Our analytical work on these models predicts that the MSN is never bistable. Nonetheless, these MSN models can produce a spontaneously bimodal membrane potential similar to that recently observed in vitro following application of NMDA agonists. We demonstrate that this bimodality is created by modelling the agonist effects as slow, irregular and massive jumps in NMDA conductance and, rather than a form of bistability, is due to the voltage-dependent blockade of NMDA receptors
25.  Dynamic dopamine modulation in the basal ganglia: Learning in Parkinson (Frank et al 2004,2005)
See README file for all info on how to run models under different tasks and simulated Parkinson's and medication conditions.
26.  Effect of cortical D1 receptor sensitivity on working memory maintenance (Reneaux & Gupta 2018)
Alterations in cortical D1 receptor density and reactivity of dopamine-binding sites, collectively termed as D1 receptor-sensitivity in the present study, have been experimentally shown to affect the working memory maintenance during delay-period. However, computational models addressing the effect of D1 receptor-sensitivity are lacking. A quantitative neural mass model of the prefronto-mesoprefrontal system has been proposed to take into account the effect of variation in cortical D1 receptor-sensitivity on working memory maintenance during delay. The model computes the delay-associated equilibrium states/operational points of the system for different values of D1 receptor-sensitivity through the nullcline and bifurcation analysis. Further, to access the robustness of the working memory maintenance during delay in the presence of alteration in D1 receptor-sensitivity, numerical simulations of the stochastic formulation of the model are performed to obtain the global potential landscape of the dynamics.
27.  Enhanced Excitability in Hermissenda: modulation by 5-HT (Cai et al 2003)
Serotonin (5-HT) applied to the exposed but otherwise intact nervous system results in enhanced excitability of Hermissenda type-B photoreceptors. Several ion currents in the type-B photoreceptors are modulated by 5-HT, including the A-type K+ current (IK,A), sustained Ca2+ current (ICa,S), Ca-dependent K+ current (IK,Ca), and a hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier current (Ih). In this study,we developed a computational model that reproduces physiological characteristics of type B photoreceptors, e.g. resting membrane potential, dark-adapted spike activity, spike width, and the amplitude difference between somatic and axonal spikes. We then used the model to investigate the contribution of different ion currents modulated by 5-HT to the magnitudes of enhanced excitability produced by 5-HT. See paper for results and more details.
28.  Excitability of DA neurons and their regulation by synaptic input (Morozova et al. 2016a, 2016b)
This code contains conductance-based models of Dopaminergic (DA) and GABAergic neurons, used in Morozova et al 2016 PLOS Computational Biology paper in order to study the type of excitability of the DA neurons and how it is influenced by the intrinsic and synaptic currents. We identified the type of excitability by calculating bifurcation diagrams and F-I curves using XPP file. This model was also used in Morozova et al 2016 J. Neurophysiology paper in order to study the effect of synchronization in GABAergic inputs on the firing dynamics of the DA neuron.
29.  Excitotoxic loss of dopaminergic cells in PD (Muddapu et al 2019)
"... A couple of the proposed mechanisms, however, show potential for the development of a novel line of PD (Parkinson's disease) therapeutics. One of these mechanisms is the peculiar metabolic vulnerability of SNc (Substantia Nigra pars compacta) cells compared to other dopaminergic clusters; the other is the SubThalamic Nucleus (STN)-induced excitotoxicity in SNc. To investigate the latter hypothesis computationally, we developed a spiking neuron network-model of SNc-STN-GPe system. In the model, prolonged stimulation of SNc cells by an overactive STN leads to an increase in ‘stress’ variable; when the stress in a SNc neuron exceeds a stress threshold, the neuron dies. The model shows that the interaction between SNc and STN involves a positive-feedback due to which, an initial loss of SNc cells that crosses a threshold causes a runaway-effect, leading to an inexorable loss of SNc cells, strongly resembling the process of neurodegeneration. The model further suggests a link between the two aforementioned mechanisms of SNc cell loss. Our simulation results show that the excitotoxic cause of SNc cell loss might initiate by weak-excitotoxicity mediated by energy deficit, followed by strong-excitotoxicity, mediated by a disinhibited STN. A variety of conventional therapies were simulated to test their efficacy in slowing down SNc cell loss. Among them, glutamate inhibition, dopamine restoration, subthalamotomy and deep brain stimulation showed superior neuroprotective-effects in the proposed model."
30.  Gamma genesis in the basolateral amygdala (Feng et al 2019)
Using in vitro and in vivo data we develop the first large-scale biophysically and anatomically realistic model of the basolateral amygdala nucleus (BL), which reproduces the dynamics of the in vivo local field potential (LFP). Significantly, it predicts that BL intrinsically generates the transient gamma oscillations observed in vivo. The model permitted exploration of the poorly understood synaptic mechanisms underlying gamma genesis in BL, and the model's ability to compute LFPs at arbitrary numbers of recording sites provided insights into the characteristics of the spatial properties of gamma bursts. Furthermore, we show how gamma synchronizes principal cells to overcome their low firing rates while simultaneously promoting competition, potentially impacting their afferent selectivity and efferent drive, and thus emotional behavior.
31.  Hippocampus CA1: Simulations of LTP signaling pathways (Kim M et al. 2011)
This is a multi-compartmental, stochastic version of the Kim et al. 2010 paper. There are a few additional reactions, and some of the rate constants have been updated. It addresses the role of molecule anchoring in PKA dependent hippocampal LTP.
32.  Hippocampus CA1: Temporal sensitivity of signaling pathways underlying LTP (Kim et al. 2010)
Temporal sensitivity of signaling pathways underlying L-LTP. Single compartment, deterministic model of calcium and dopamine activated pathways, leading to CaMKII and PKA activation. Experimental verification of model prediction.
33.  Hyperbolic model (Daneshzand et al 2017)
A modified Izhikevich neuron model to address the switching patterns of neuronal firing seen in Parkinson's Disease.
34.  L5 pyr. cell spiking control by oscillatory inhibition in distal apical dendrites (Li et al 2013)
This model examined how distal oscillatory inhibition influences the firing of a biophysically-detailed layer 5 pyramidal neuron model.
35.  Low dose of dopamine may stimulate prolactin secretion by increasing K currents (Tabak et al. 2006)
".. We considered the fast K+ currents flowing through large-conductance BK channels and through A-type channels. We developed a minimal lactotroph model to investigate the effects of these two currents. Both IBK and IA could transform the electrical pattern of activity from spiking to bursting, but through distinct mechanisms. IBK always increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, while IA could either increase or decrease it. Thus, the stimulatory effects of DA could be mediated by a fast K+ conductance which converts tonically spiking cells to bursters. In addition, the study illustrates that a heterogeneous distribution of fast K+ conductances could cause heterogeneous lactotroph firing patterns."
36.  MDD: the role of glutamate dysfunction on Cingulo-Frontal NN dynamics (Ramirez-Mahaluf et al 2017)
" ...Currently, no mechanistic framework describes how network dynamics, glutamate, and serotonin interact to explain MDD symptoms and treatments. Here, we built a biophysical computational model of 2 areas (vACC and dlPFC) that can switch between emotional and cognitive processing. (Major Depression Disease) MDD networks were simulated by slowing glutamate decay in vACC and demonstrated sustained vACC activation. ..."
37.  Model of DARPP-32 phosphorylation in striatal medium spiny neurons (Lindskog et al. 2006)
The work describes a model of how transient calcium and dopamine inputs might affect phosphorylation of DARPP-32 in the medium spiny neurons in the striatum. The model is relevant for understanding both the "three-factor rule" for synaptic plasticity in corticostriatal synapses, and also for relating reinforcement learning theories to biology.
38.  Modeling interactions in Aplysia neuron R15 (Yu et al 2004)
"The biophysical properties of neuron R15 in Aplysia endow it with the ability to express multiple modes of oscillatory electrical activity, such as beating and bursting. Previous modeling studies examined the ways in which membrane conductances contribute to the electrical activity of R15 and the ways in which extrinsic modulatory inputs alter the membrane conductances by biochemical cascades and influence the electrical activity. The goals of the present study were to examine the ways in which electrical activity influences the biochemical cascades and what dynamical properties emerge from the ongoing interactions between electrical activity and these cascades." See paper for more and details.
39.  Modeling the effects of dopamine on network synchronization (Komek et al. 2012)
Dopamine modulates cortical circuit activity in part through its actions on GABAergic interneurons, including increasing the excitability of fast-spiking interneurons. Though such effects have been demonstrated in single cells, there are no studies that examine how such mechanisms may lead to the effects of dopamine at a neural network level. In this study, we investigated the effects of dopamine on synchronization in two simulated neural networks; one biophysical model composed of Wang-Buzsaki neurons and a reduced model with theta neurons. In both models, we show that parametrically varying the levels of dopamine, modeled through the changes in the excitability of interneurons, reveals an inverted-U shaped relationship, with low gamma band power at both low and high dopamine levels and optimal synchronization at intermediate levels. Moreover, such a relationship holds when the external input is both tonic and periodic at gamma band range. Together, our results indicate that dopamine can modulate cortical gamma band synchrony in an inverted-U fashion and that the physiologic effects of dopamine on single fast-spiking interneurons can give rise to such non-monotonic effects at the network level.
40.  Neural mass model of the neocortex under sleep regulation (Costa et al 2016)
This model generates typical human EEG patterns of sleep stages N2/N3 as well as wakefulness and REM. It further contains a sleep regulatory component, that lets the model transition between those stages independently
41.  Nicotinic control of dopamine release in nucleus accumbens (Maex et al. 2014)
Minimal model of the VTA (ventral segmental area) representing two (GABA versus dopamine) neuron populations and two subtypes of nicotinic receptors (alpha4beta2 versus alpha7). The model is used to tell apart circuit from receptor mechanisms in the nicotinic control of dopamine release and its pharmacological manipulation.
42.  Nigral dopaminergic neurons: effects of ethanol on Ih (Migliore et al. 2008)
We use a realistic computational model of dopaminergic neurons in vivo to suggest that ethanol, through its effects on Ih, modifies the temporal structure of the spiking activity. The model predicts that the dopamine level may increase much more during bursting than pacemaking activity, especially in those brain regions with a slow dopamine clearance rate. The results suggest that a selective pharmacological remedy could thus be devised against the rewarding effects of ethanol that are postulated to mediate alcohol abuse and addiction, targeting the specific HCN genes expressed in dopaminergic neurons.
43.  Oxytocin and VIP involvement in prolactin secretion (Egli et al. 2004,2006, Bertram et al. 2006)
"Prolactin (PRL) is secreted from lactotrophs of the anterior pituitary gland of rats in a unique pattern in response to uterine cervical stimulation (CS) during mating. Surges of PRL secretion occur in response to relief from hypothalamic dopaminergic inhibition and stimulation by hypothalamic releasing neurohormones. In this study, we characterized the role of oxytocin (OT) in this system and the involvement of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in controlling OT and PRL secretion of CS rats. ... OT measurements of serial blood samples obtained from ovariectomized (OVX) CS rats displayed a prominent increase at the time of the afternoon PRL peak. The injection of VIP antisense oligonucleotides into the SCN abolished the afternoon increase of OT and PRL in CS-OVX animals. These findings suggest that VIP from the SCN contributes to the regulation of OT and PRL secretion in CS rats. We propose that in CS rats the regulatory mechanism(s) for PRL secretion comprise coordinated action of neuroendocrine dopaminergic and OT cells, both governed by the daily rhythm of VIP-ergic output from the SCN. This hypothesis is illustrated with a mathematical model."
44.  Pancreatic Beta Cell signalling pathways (Fridlyand & Philipson 2016) (MATLAB)
This is a 3rd party implementation of Fridlyand & Philipson 2016 who's abstract begins "Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. ..."
45.  Population-level model of the basal ganglia and action selection (Gurney et al 2001, 2004)
We proposed a new functional architecture for the basal ganglia (BG) based on the premise that these brain structures play a central role in behavioural action selection. The papers quantitatively describes the properties of the model using analysis and simulation. In the first paper, we show that the decomposition of the BG into selection and control pathways is supported in several ways. First, several elegant features are exposed--capacity scaling, enhanced selectivity and synergistic dopamine modulation--which might be expected to exist in a well designed action selection mechanism. Second, good matches between model GPe output and GPi and SNr output, and neurophysiological data, have been found. Third, the behaviour of the model as a signal selection mechanism has parallels with some kinds of action selection observed in animals under various levels of dopaminergic modulation. In the second paper, we extend the BG model to include new connections, and show that action selection is maintained. In addition, we provide quantitative measures for defining different forms of selection, and methods for assessing performance changes in computational neuroscience models.
46.  Reconstrucing sleep dynamics with data assimilation (Sedigh-Sarvestani et al., 2012)
We have developed a framework, based on the unscented Kalman filter, for estimating hidden states and parameters of a network model of sleep. The network model includes firing rates and neurotransmitter output of 5 cell-groups in the rat brain.
47.  Reinforcement learning of targeted movement (Chadderdon et al. 2012)
"Sensorimotor control has traditionally been considered from a control theory perspective, without relation to neurobiology. In contrast, here we utilized a spiking-neuron model of motor cortex and trained it to perform a simple movement task, which consisted of rotating a single-joint “forearm” to a target. Learning was based on a reinforcement mechanism analogous to that of the dopamine system. This provided a global reward or punishment signal in response to decreasing or increasing distance from hand to target, respectively. Output was partially driven by Poisson motor babbling, creating stochastic movements that could then be shaped by learning. The virtual forearm consisted of a single segment rotated around an elbow joint, controlled by flexor and extensor muscles. ..."
48.  Reproducing infra-slow oscillations with dopaminergic modulation (Kobayashi et al 2017)
" ... In this paper, to reproduce ISO (Infra-Slow Oscillations) in neural networks, we show that dopaminergic modulation of STDP is essential. More specifically, we discovered a close relationship between two dopaminergic effects: modulation of the STDP function and generation of ISO. We therefore, numerically investigated the relationship in detail and proposed a possible mechanism by which ISO is generated."
49.  Roles of subthalamic nucleus and DBS in reinforcement conflict-based decision making (Frank 2006)
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus dramatically improves the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but causes cognitive side effects such as impulsivity. This model from Frank (2006) simulates the role of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) within the basal ganglia circuitry in decision making. The STN dynamically modulates network decision thresholds in proportion to decision conflict. The STN ``hold your horses'' signal adaptively allows the system more time to settle on the best choice when multiple options are valid. The model also replicates effects in Parkinson's patients on and off DBS in experiments designed to test the model (Frank et al, 2007).
50.  Sequential neuromodulation of Hebbian plasticity in reward-based navigation (Brzosko et al 2017)
" ...Here, we demonstrate that sequential neuromodulation of STDP by acetylcholine and dopamine offers an efficacious model of reward-based navigation. Specifically, our experimental data in mouse hippocampal slices show that acetylcholine biases STDP toward synaptic depression, whilst subsequent application of dopamine converts this depression into potentiation. Incorporating this bidirectional neuromodulation-enabled correlational synaptic learning rule into a computational model yields effective navigation toward changing reward locations, as in natural foraging behavior. ..."
51.  Serotonergic modulation of Aplysia sensory neurons (Baxter et al 1999)
The present study investigated how the modulation of these currents altered the spike duration and excitability of sensory neurons and examined the relative contributions of PKA- and PKC-mediated effects to the actions of 5-HT. A Hodgkin-Huxley type model was developed that described the ionic conductances in the somata of sensory neurons. The descriptions of these currents and their modulation were based largely on voltageclamp data from sensory neurons. Simulations were preformed with the program SNNAP (Simulator for Neural Networks and Action Potentials). The model was sufficient to replicate empirical data that describes the membrane currents, action potential waveform and excitability as well as their modulation by application of 5-HT, increased levels of adenosine cyclic monophosphate or application of active phorbol esters. The results provide several predictions that warrant additional experimental investigation and illustrate the importance of considering indirect as well as direct effects of modulatory agents on the modulation of membrane currents. See paper for more details.
52.  Signaling pathways In D1R containing striatal spiny projection neurons (Blackwell et al 2018)
We implemented a mechanistic model of signaling pathways activated by dopamine D1 receptors, acetylcholine receptors, and glutamate. We use our novel, computationally efficient simulator, NeuroRD, to simulate stochastic interactions both within and between dendritic spines. Results show that the combined activity of several key plasticity molecules correctly predicts the occurrence of either LTP, LTD or no plasticity for numerous experimental protocols.
53.  Signaling pathways underlying LTP in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells (Jedrzejewska-Szmek et al 2017)
" ...We investigated whether the diverse experimental evidence can be unified by creating a spatial, mechanistic model of multiple signaling pathways in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Our results show that the combination of activity of several key kinases can predict the occurrence of long-lasting forms of LTP for multiple experimental protocols. ..."
54.  Spiking neuron model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al 2006)
A spiking neuron model of the basal ganglia (BG) circuit (striatum, STN, GP, SNr). Includes: parallel anatomical channels; tonic dopamine; dopamine receptors in striatum, STN, and GP; burst-firing in STN; GABAa, AMPA, and NMDA currents; effects of synaptic location. Model demonstrates selection and switching of input signals. Replicates experimental data on changes in slow-wave (<1 Hz) and gamma-band oscillations within BG nuclei following lesions and pharmacological manipulations.
55.  Spiny neuron model with dopamine-induced bistability (Gruber et al 2003)
These files implement a model of dopaminergic modulation of voltage-gated currents (called kir2 and caL in the original paper). See spinycell.html for details of usage and implementation. For questions about this implementation, contact Ted Carnevale (ted.carnevale@yale.edu)
56.  Striatal D1R medium spiny neuron, including a subcellular DA cascade (Lindroos et al 2018)
We are investigating how dopaminergic modulation of single channels can be combined to make the D1R possitive MSN more excitable. We also connect multiple channels to substrates of a dopamine induced subcellular cascade to highlight that the classical pathway is too slow to explain DA induced kinetics in the subsecond range (Howe and Dombeck, 2016. doi: 10.1038/nature18942)
57.  Striatal dopamine ramping: an explanation by reinforcement learning with decay (Morita & Kato, 2014)
Incorporation of decay of learned values into temporal-difference (TD) learning (Sutton & Barto, 1998, Reinforcement Learning (MIT Press)) causes ramping of TD reward prediction error (RPE), which could explain, given the hypothesis that dopamine represents TD RPE (Montague et al., 1996, J Neurosci 16:1936; Schultz et al., 1997, Science 275:1593), the reported ramping of the dopamine concentration in the striatum in a reward-associated spatial navigation task (Howe et al., 2013, Nature 500:575).
58.  Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
59.  Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.
60.  Synchronization by D4 dopamine receptor-mediated phospholipid methylation (Kuznetsova, Deth 2008)
"We describe a new molecular mechanism of dopamine-induced membrane protein modulation that can tune neuronal oscillation frequency to attention related gamma rhythm. This mechanism is based on the unique ability of D4 dopamine receptors (D4R) to carry out phospholipid methylation (PLM) that may affect the kinetics of ion channels. We show that by deceasing the inertia of the delayed rectifier potassium channel, a transition to 40 Hz oscillations can be achieved. ..."
61.  Tag Trigger Consolidation (Clopath and Ziegler et al. 2008)
This model simulates different phases of LTP/D, i.e. the induction or early phase, the setting of synaptic tags, a trigger process for protein synthesis, and a slow transition leading to synaptic consolidation namely the late phase of synaptic plasticity. The model explains a large body of experimental data on synaptic tagging and capture, cross-tagging, and the late phases of LTP and LTD. Moreover, the model accounts for the dependence of LTP and LTD induction on voltage and presynaptic stimulation frequency.

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