Models that contain the Model Concept : Synaptic Convergence

(Synaptic convergence describes a pattern of connectivity in neural networks where multiple inputs from diverse sources (cells or brain regions) connect to the same target cell(s). )
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    Models   Description
1.  A Model Circuit of Thalamocortical Convergence (Behuret et al. 2013)
“… Using dynamic-clamp techniques in thalamic slices in vitro, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to implement a realistic hybrid retino-thalamo-cortical pathway mixing biological cells and simulated circuits. … The study of the impact of the simulated cortical input on the global retinocortical signal transfer efficiency revealed a novel control mechanism resulting from the collective resonance of all thalamic relay neurons. We show here that the transfer efficiency of sensory input transmission depends on three key features: i) the number of thalamocortical cells involved in the many-to-one convergence from thalamus to cortex, ii) the statistics of the corticothalamic synaptic bombardment and iii) the level of correlation imposed between converging thalamic relay cells. In particular, our results demonstrate counterintuitively that the retinocortical signal transfer efficiency increases when the level of correlation across thalamic cells decreases. …”
2.  Convergence regulates synchronization-dependent AP transfer in feedforward NNs (Sailamul et al 2017)
We study how synchronization-dependent spike transfer can be affected by the structure of convergent feedforward wiring. We implemented computer simulations of model neural networks: a source and a target layer connected with different types of convergent wiring rules. In the Gaussian-Gaussian (GG) model, both the connection probability and the strength are given as Gaussian distribution as a function of spatial distance. In the Uniform-Constant (UC) and Uniform-Exponential (UE) models, the connection probability density is a uniform constant within a certain range, but the connection strength is set as a constant value or an exponentially decaying function, respectively. Then we examined how the spike transfer function is modulated under these conditions, while static or synchronized input patterns were introduced to simulate different levels of feedforward spike synchronization. We observed that the synchronization-dependent modulation of the transfer function appeared noticeably different for each convergence condition. The modulation of the spike transfer function was largest in the UC model, and smallest in the UE model. Our analysis showed that this difference was induced by the different spike weight distributions that was generated from convergent synapses in each model. Our results suggest that the structure of the feedforward convergence is a crucial factor for correlation-dependent spike control, thus must be considered important to understand the mechanism of information transfer in the brain.
3.  Excitability of DA neurons and their regulation by synaptic input (Morozova et al. 2016a, 2016b)
This code contains conductance-based models of Dopaminergic (DA) and GABAergic neurons, used in Morozova et al 2016 PLOS Computational Biology paper in order to study the type of excitability of the DA neurons and how it is influenced by the intrinsic and synaptic currents. We identified the type of excitability by calculating bifurcation diagrams and F-I curves using XPP file. This model was also used in Morozova et al 2016 J. Neurophysiology paper in order to study the effect of synchronization in GABAergic inputs on the firing dynamics of the DA neuron.
4.  Sympathetic neuron (Wheeler et al 2004)
This study shows how synaptic convergence and plasticity can interact to generate synaptic gain in autonomic ganglia and thereby enhance homeostatic control. Using a conductance-based computational model of an idealized sympathetic neuron, we simulated the postganglionic response to noisy patterns of presynaptic activity and found that a threefold amplification in postsynaptic spike output can arise in ganglia, depending on the number and strength of nicotinic synapses, the presynaptic firing rate, the extent of presynaptic facilitation, and the expression of muscarinic and peptidergic excitation. See references for details.
5.  Synaptic plasticity can produce and enhance direction selectivity (Carver et al, 2008)
" ... We propose a parsimonious model of motion processing that generates direction selective responses using short-term synaptic depression and can reproduce salient features of direction selectivity found in a population of neurons in the midbrain of the weakly electric fish Eigenmannia virescens. The model achieves direction selectivity with an elementary Reichardt motion detector: information from spatially separated receptive fields converges onto a neuron via dynamically different pathways. In the model, these differences arise from convergence of information through distinct synapses that either exhibit or do not exhibit short-term synaptic depression—short-term depression produces phase-advances relative to nondepressing synapses. ..."

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