Models that contain the Neuron : Dentate gyrus granule cell

(The principal neuron of the fascia dentata of the hippocampal region. It forms a single layer of cell bodies. Each cell has a dendritic tree that extends toward the surface. The branches are covered with dendritic spines. The input is carried by axons which arise in the nearby entorinal cortex and "perforate" the intervening cortex to make excitatory glutamatergic synapses onto the spines. The output is carried in an axon which becomes a mossy fiber as it arrives in CA3 and CA2 of the hippocampus to make glutamatergic synapes onto the spinous excrecenses of hippocampal pyramidal cells in those regions.)
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    Models   Description
1.  Action potential reconstitution from measured current waveforms (Alle et al. 2009)
This NEURON code reconstitutes action potentials in a model of a hippocampal mossy fiber from experimentally measured sodium, potassium and calcium current waveforms as described in Alle et al. (2009).
2.  Comparison of DA-based Stochastic Algorithms (Pezo et al. 2014)
" ... Here we review and test a set of the most recently published DA (Langevin-based Diffusion Approximation) implementations (Goldwyn et al., 2011; Linaro et al., 2011; Dangerfield et al., 2012; Orio and Soudry, 2012; Schmandt and Galán, 2012; Güler, 2013; Huang et al., 2013a), comparing all of them in a set of numerical simulations that asses numerical accuracy and computational efficiency on three different models: the original Hodgkin and Huxley model, a model with faster sodium channels, and a multi-compartmental model inspired in granular cells. ..."
3.  Dentate granule cell: mAHP & sAHP; SK & Kv7/M channels (Mateos-Aparicio et al., 2014)
The model is based on that of Aradi & Holmes (1999; Journal of Computational Neuroscience 6, 215-235). It was used to help understand the contribution of M and SK channels to the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) following one or seven spikes, as well as the contribution of M channels to the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP). We found that SK channels are the main determinants of the mAHP, in contrast to CA1 pyramidal cells where the mAHP is primarily caused by the opening of M channels. The model reproduced these experimental results, but we were unable to reproduce the effects of the M-channel blocker XE991 on the sAHP. It is suggested that either the XE991-sensitive component of the sAHP is not due to M channels, or that when contributing to the sAHP, these channels operate in a mode different from that associated with the mAHP.
4.  Dentate gyrus (Morgan et al. 2007, 2008, Santhakumar et al. 2005, Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen et al. 2007)
This model was implemented by Rob Morgan in the Soltesz lab at UC Irvine. It is a scaleable model of the rat dentate gyrus including four cell types. This model runs in serial (on a single processor) and has been published at the size of 50,000 granule cells (with proportional numbers of the other cells).
5.  Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
6.  Dentate gyrus granule cell: calcium and calcium-dependent conductances (Aradi and Holmes 1999)
We have constructed a detailed model of a hippocampal dentate granule (DG) cell that includes nine different channel types. Channel densities and distributions were chosen to reproduce reported physiological responses observed in normal solution and when blockers were applied. The model was used to explore the contribution of each channel type to spiking behavior with particular emphasis on the mechanisms underlying postspike events. ... The model was used to predict changes in channel densities that could lead to epileptogenic burst discharges and to predict the effect of altered buffering capacity on firing behavior. We conclude that the clustered spatial distributions of calcium related channels, the presence of slow delayed rectifier potassium currents in dendrites, and calcium buffering properties, together, might explain the resistance of DG cells to the development of epileptogenic burst discharges.
7.  Dentate gyrus granule cell: subthreshold signal processing (Schmidt-Hieber et al. 2007)
Detailed compartmental cable models of 8 hippocampal granule cells of adult mice were obtained from dual patch-clamp whole-cell recordings and subsequent 3D reconstructions. This code allows to reproduce figures 6-8 from the paper.
8.  Dentate Gyrus model including Granule cells with dendritic compartments (Chavlis et al 2017)
Here we investigate the role of dentate granule cell dendrites in pattern separation. The model consists of point neurons (Integrate and fire) and in principal neurons, the granule cells, we have incorporated various number of dendrites.
9.  Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
10.  Dentate gyrus network model (Tejada et al 2014)
" ... Here we adapted an existing computational model of the dentate gyrus (J Neurophysiol 93: 437-453, 2005) by replacing the reduced granule cell models with morphologically detailed models coming from (3D) reconstructions of mature cells. ... Different fractions of the mature granule cell models were replaced by morphologically reconstructed models of newborn dentate granule cells from animals with PILO-induced Status Epilepticus, which have apical dendritic alterations and spine loss, and control animals, which do not have these alterations. This complex arrangement of cells and processes allowed us to study the combined effect of mossy fiber sprouting, altered apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells on the excitability of the dentate gyrus model. Our simulations suggest that alterations in the apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells have opposing effects on the excitability of the dentate gyrus after Status Epilepticus. Apical dendritic alterations potentiate the increase of excitability provoked by mossy fiber sprouting while spine loss curtails this increase. "
11.  Dentate gyrus network model pattern separation and granule cell scaling in epilepsy (Yim et al 2015)
The dentate gyrus (DG) is thought to enable efficient hippocampal memory acquisition via pattern separation. With patterns defined as spatiotemporally distributed action potential sequences, the principal DG output neurons (granule cells, GCs), presumably sparsen and separate similar input patterns from the perforant path (PP). In electrophysiological experiments, we have demonstrated that during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), GCs downscale their excitability by transcriptional upregulation of ‘leak’ channels. Here we studied whether this cell type-specific intrinsic plasticity is in a position to homeostatically adjust DG network function. We modified an established conductance-based computer model of the DG network such that it realizes a spatiotemporal pattern separation task, and quantified its performance with and without the experimentally constrained leaky GC phenotype. ...
12.  DG granule cell: I-A model (Beck et al 1992)
NEURON mod files for the I-A current from the paper: Beck H, Ficker E, Heinemann U. Properties of two voltage-activated potassium currents in acutely isolated juvenile rat dentate gyrus granule cells. J. Neurophysiol. 68, 2086-2099 (1992) Contact michele.migliore@pa.ibf.cnr.it if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
13.  Distance-dependent inhibition in the hippocampus (Strüber et al. 2017)
Network model of a hippocampal circuit including interneurons and principal cells. Amplitude and decay time course of inhibitory synapses can be systematically changed for different distances between connected cells. Various forms of excitatory drives can be administered to the network including spatially structured input.
14.  Effects of Chloride accumulation and diffusion on GABAergic transmission (Jedlicka et al 2011)
"In the CNS, prolonged activation of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) has been shown to evoke biphasic postsynaptic responses, consisting of an initial hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization. A potential mechanism underlying the depolarization is an acute chloride (Cl(-)) accumulation resulting in a shift of the GABA(A) reversal potential (E(GABA)). The amount of GABA-evoked Cl(-) accumulation and accompanying depolarization depends on presynaptic and postsynaptic properties of GABAergic transmission, as well as on cellular morphology and regulation of Cl(-) intracellular concentration ([Cl(-)](i)). To analyze the influence of these factors on the Cl(-) and voltage behavior, we studied spatiotemporal dynamics of activity-dependent [Cl(-)](i) changes in multicompartmental models of hippocampal cells based on realistic morphological data. ..."
15.  Epilepsy may be caused by very small functional changes in ion channels (Thomas et al. 2009)
We used a previously published model of the dentate gyrus with varying degrees of mossy fibre sprouting.We preformed a sensitivity analysis where we systematically varied individual properties of ion channels. The results predict that genetic variations in the properties of sodium channels are likely to have the biggest impact on network excitability. Furthermore, these changes may be as small as 1mV, which is currently undetectable using standard experimental practices.
16.  Fast sodium channel gating in mossy fiber axons (Schmidt-Hieber et al. 2010)
"... To study the mechanisms underlying AP initiation in unmyelinated hippocampal mossy fibers of adult mice, we recorded sodium currents in axonal and somatic membrane patches. We demonstrate that sodium channel density in the proximal axon is ~5 times higher than in the soma. Furthermore, sodium channel activation and inactivation are ~2 times faster. Modeling revealed that the fast activation localized the initiation site to the proximal axon even upon strong synaptic stimulation, while fast inactivation contributed to energy-efficient membrane charging during APs. ..."
17.  GC model (Beining et al 2017)
A companion modeldb entry (NEURON only) to modeldb accession number 231862.
18.  Generation of granule cell dendritic morphology (Schneider et al. 2014)
The following code was used to generate a complete population of 1.2 million granule cell dendritic morphologies within a realistic three-dimensional context. These generated dendritic morphologies match the known biological variability and context-dependence of morphological features.
19.  In vivo imaging of dentate gyrus mossy cells in behaving mice (Danielson et al 2017)
Mossy cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus constitute a major excitatory principal cell type in the mammalian hippocampus, however, it remains unknown how these cells behave in vivo. Here, we have used two-photon Ca2+ imaging to monitor the activity of mossy cells in awake, behaving mice. We find that mossy cells are significantly more active than dentate granule cells in vivo, exhibit significant spatial tuning during head-fixed spatial navigation, and undergo robust remapping of their spatial representations in response to contextual manipulation. Our results provide the first characterization of mossy cells in the behaving animal and demonstrate their active participation in spatial coding and contextual representation.
20.  Long time windows from theta modulated inhib. in entorhinal–hippo. loop (Cutsuridis & Poirazi 2015)
"A recent experimental study (Mizuseki et al., 2009) has shown that the temporal delays between population activities in successive entorhinal and hippocampal anatomical stages are longer (about 70–80 ms) than expected from axon conduction velocities and passive synaptic integration of feed-forward excitatory inputs. We investigate via computer simulations the mechanisms that give rise to such long temporal delays in the hippocampus structures. ... The model shows that the experimentally reported long temporal delays in the DG, CA3 and CA1 hippocampal regions are due to theta modulated somatic and axonic inhibition..."
21.  Mature and young adult-born dentate granule cell models (T2N interface) (Beining et al. 2017)
... Here, we present T2N, a powerful interface to control NEURON with Matlab and TREES toolbox, which supports generating models stable over a broad range of reconstructed and synthetic morphologies. We illustrate this for a novel, highly-detailed active model of dentate granule cells (GCs) replicating a wide palette of experiments from various labs. By implementing known differences in ion channel composition and morphology, our model reproduces data from mouse or rat, mature or adult-born GCs as well as pharmacological interventions and epileptic conditions. ... T2N is suitable for creating robust models useful for large-scale networks that could lead to novel predictions. ..." See modeldb accession number 231818 for NEURON only code.
22.  Modeling dentate granule cells heterosynaptic plasticity using STDP-BCM rule (Jedlicka et al. 2015)
... Here we study how key components of learning mechanisms in the brain, namely spike timing-dependent plasticity and metaplasticity, interact with spontaneous activity in the input pathways of the neuron. Using biologically realistic simulations we show that ongoing background activity is a key determinant of the degree of long-term potentiation and long-term depression of synaptic transmission between nerve cells in the hippocampus of freely moving animals. This work helps better understand the computational rules which drive synaptic plasticity in vivo. ...
23.  Na channel mutations in the dentate gyrus (Thomas et al. 2009)
These are source files to generate the data in Figure 6 from "Mossy fiber sprouting interacts with sodium channel mutations to increase dentate gyrus excitability" Thomas EA, Reid CA, Petrou S, Epilepsia (2009)
24.  Paradoxical effect of fAHP amplitude on gain in dentate gyrus granule cells (Jaffe & Brenner 2017)
The afterhyperpolarization (AHP) is canonically viewed as a major factor underlying the refractory period, serving to limit neuronal firing rate. We recently reported (Wang et al, J. Neurophys. 116:456, 2016) that enhancing the amplitude of the fast AHP in a relatively slowly firing neuron (versus fast spiking neurons), augments neuronal excitability in dentate gyrus granule neurons expressing gain-of-function BK channels. Here we present a novel, quantitative hypothesis for how varying the amplitude of the fast AHP (fAHP) can, paradoxically, influence a subsequent spike tens of milliseconds later.
25.  Role for short term plasticity and OLM cells in containing spread of excitation (Hummos et al 2014)
This hippocampus model was developed by matching experimental data, including neuronal behavior, synaptic current dynamics, network spatial connectivity patterns, and short-term synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, it was constrained to perform pattern completion and separation under the effects of acetylcholine. The model was then used to investigate the role of short-term synaptic depression at the recurrent synapses in CA3, and inhibition by basket cell (BC) interneurons and oriens lacunosum-moleculare (OLM) interneurons in containing the unstable spread of excitatory activity in the network.
26.  Shaping of action potentials by different types of BK channels (Jaffe et al., 2011)
Dentate gyrus granule cells highly express the beta4 accessory subunit which confer BK channels with type II properties. The properties of heterologously-expressed BK channels (with and without the beta4 subunit) were used to construct channel models. These were then used to study how they affect single action potentials and trains of spikes in a model dentate gyrus granule cells (based on Aradi and Holmes, 1999).
27.  Sodium currents activate without a delay (Baranauskas and Martina 2006)
Hodgkin and Huxley established that sodium currents in the squid giant axons activate after a delay, which is explained by the model of a channel with three identical independent gates that all have to open before the channel can pass current (the HH model). It is assumed that this model can adequately describe the sodium current activation time course in all mammalian central neurons, although there is no experimental evidence to support such a conjecture. We performed high temporal resolution studies of sodium currents gating in three types of central neurons. ... These results can be explained by a model with two closed states and one open state. ... This model captures all major properties of the sodium current activation. In addition, the proposed model reproduces the observed action potential shape more accurately than the traditional HH model. See paper for more and details.
28.  Spine fusion and branching effects synaptic response (Rusakov et al 1996, 1997)
This compartmental model of a hippocampal granule cell has spinous synapses placed on the second-order dendrites. Changes in shape and connectivity of the spines usually does not effect the synaptic response of the cell unless active conductances are incorporated into the spine membrane (e.g. voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels). With active conductances, spines can generate spike-like events. We showed that changes like fusion and branching, or in fact any increase in the equivalent spine neck resistance, could trigger a dramatic increase in the spine's influence on the dendritic shaft potential.
29.  State dependent drug binding to sodium channels in the dentate gyrus (Thomas & Petrou 2013)
A Markov model of sodium channels was developed that includes drug binding to fast inactivated states. This was incorporated into a model of the dentate gyrus to investigate the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on neuron and network properties.
30.  Stochastic ion channels and neuronal morphology (Cannon et al. 2010)
"... We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. ..." The code is downloadable and more information is available at <a href="http://www.psics.org/">http://www.psics.org/</a>

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