Models that contain the Neuron : Cerebellum Purkinje GABA cell

Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  A cortico-cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop model under essential tremor (Zhang & Santaniello 2019)
We investigated the origins of oscillations under essential tremor (ET) by building a computational model of the cortico-cerebello-thalamo-cortical loop. It showed that an alteration of amplitudes and decay times of the GABAergic currents to the dentate nucleus can facilitate sustained oscillatory activity at tremor frequency throughout the network as well as a robust bursting activity in the thalamus, which is consistent with observations of thalamic tremor cells in ET patients. Tremor-related oscillations initiated in small neural populations and spread to a larger network as the synaptic dysfunction increased, while thalamic high-frequency stimulation suppressed tremor-related activity in thalamus but increased the oscillation frequency in the olivocerebellar loop.
2.  A detailed Purkinje cell model (Masoli et al 2015)
The Purkinje cell is one of the most complex type of neuron in the central nervous system and is well known for its massive dendritic tree. The initiation of the action potential was theorized to be due to the high calcium channels presence in the dendritic tree but, in the last years, this idea was revised. In fact, the Axon Initial Segment, the first section of the axon was seen to be critical for the spontaneous generation of action potentials. The model reproduces the behaviours linked to the presence of this fundamental sections and the interplay with the other parts of the neuron.
3.  A kinetic model unifying presynaptic short-term facilitation and depression (Lee et al. 2009)
"... Here, we propose a unified theory of synaptic short-term plasticity based on realistic yet tractable and testable model descriptions of the underlying intracellular biochemical processes. Analysis of the model equations leads to a closed-form solution of the resonance frequency, a function of several critical biophysical parameters, as the single key indicator of the propensity for synaptic facilitation or depression under repetitive stimuli. This integrative model is supported by a broad range of transient and frequency response experimental data including those from facilitating, depressing or mixed-mode synapses. ... the model provides the reasons behind the switching behavior between facilitation and depression observed in experiments. ..."
4.  A model of cerebellar LTD including RKIP inactivation of Raf and MEK (Hepburn et al 2017)
An updated stochastic model of cerebellar Long Term Depression (LTD) with improved realism. Dissociation of Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) from Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and Raf kinase are added to an earlier published model. Calcium dynamics is updated as a constant-rate influx to more closely match experiment. AMPA receptor interactions are improved by adding phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of AMPA receptors when bound to glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP). The model is tuned to reproduce experimental calcium peak vs LTD amplitude curves accurately at 4 different calcium pulse durations.
5.  A simplified cerebellar Purkinje neuron (the PPR model) (Brown et al. 2011)
These models were implemented in NEURON by Sherry-Ann Brown in the laboratory of Leslie M. Loew. The files reproduce Figures 2c-f from Brown et al, 2011 "Virtual NEURON: a Strategy For Merged Biochemical and Electrophysiological Modeling".
6.  Adaptive robotic control driven by a versatile spiking cerebellar network (Casellato et al. 2014)
" ... We have coupled a realistic cerebellar spiking neural network (SNN) with a real robot and challenged it in multiple diverse sensorimotor tasks. ..."
7.  Alcohol action in a detailed Purkinje neuron model and an efficient simplified model (Forrest 2015)
" ... we employ a novel reduction algorithm to produce a 2 compartment model of the cerebellar Purkinje neuron from a previously published, 1089 compartment model. It runs more than 400 times faster and retains the electrical behavior of the full model. So, it is more suitable for inclusion in large network models, where computational power is a limiting issue. We show the utility of this reduced model by demonstrating that it can replicate the full model’s response to alcohol, which can in turn reproduce experimental recordings from Purkinje neurons following alcohol application. ..."
8.  Axonal gap junctions produce fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells (Traub et al. 2008)
Examines how electrical coupling between proximal axons produces fast oscillations in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Traub RD, Middleton SJ, Knopfel T, Whittington MA (2008) Model of very fast (>75 Hz) network oscillations generated by electrical coupling between the proximal axons of cerebellar Purkinje cells. European Journal of Neuroscience.
9.  Ca2+ requirements for Long-Term Depression in Purkinje Cells (Criseida Zamora et al 2018)
An updated stochastic model of cerebellar Long-Term Depression (LTD) to study the requirements of calcium to induce LTD. Calcium signal is generated as a train of calcium pulses and this can be modulated by its amplitude, frequency, width and number of pulses. CaMKII activation and its regulatory pathway are added to an earlier published model to study the sensitivity to calcium frequency. The model is useful to investigate systematically the dependence of LTD induction on calcium stimuli parameters.
10.  Calcium dynamics depend on dendritic diameters (Anwar et al. 2014)
"... in dendrites there is a strong contribution of morphology because the peak calcium levels are strongly determined by the surface to volume ratio (SVR) of each branch, which is inversely related to branch diameter. In this study we explore the predicted variance of dendritic calcium concentrations due to local changes in dendrite diameter and how this is affected by the modeling approach used. We investigate this in a model of dendritic calcium spiking in different reconstructions of cerebellar Purkinje cells and in morphological analysis of neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. ..."
11.  Cerebellar gain and timing control model (Yamazaki & Tanaka 2007)(Yamazaki & Nagao 2012)
This paper proposes a hypothetical computational mechanism for unified gain and timing control in the cerebellum. The hypothesis is justified by computer simulations of a large-scale spiking network model of the cerebellum.
12.  Cerebellar long-term depression (LTD) (Antunes and De Schutter 2012)
Many cellular processes involve small number of molecules and undergo stochastic fluctuations in their levels of activity. Among these processes is cerebellar long-term depression (LTD), a form of synaptic plasticity expressed as a reduction in the number of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in Purkinje cells. Using a stochastic model of the signaling network and mechanisms of AMPAR trafficking involved in LTD, we show that the network activity in single synapses switches between two discrete stable states (LTD and non-LTD). Stochastic fluctuations affecting more intensely the level of activity of a few components of the network lead to the probabilistic induction of LTD and threshold dithering. The non-uniformly distributed stochasticity of the network allows the stable occurrence of several different macroscopic levels of depression, determining the experimentally observed sigmoidal relationship between the magnitude of depression and the concentration of the triggering signal.
13.  Cerebellar memory consolidation model (Yamazaki et al. 2015)
"Long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (PF-PC) synapses is thought to underlie memory formation in cerebellar motor learning. Recent experimental results, however, suggest that multiple plasticity mechanisms in the cerebellar cortex and cerebellar/vestibular nuclei participate in memory formation. To examine this possibility, we formulated a simple model of the cerebellum with a minimal number of components based on its known anatomy and physiology, implementing both LTD and long-term potentiation (LTP) at PF-PC synapses and mossy fiber-vestibular nuclear neuron (MF-VN) synapses. With this model, we conducted a simulation study of the gain adaptation of optokinetic response (OKR) eye movement. Our model reproduced several important aspects of previously reported experimental results in wild-type and cerebellum-related gene-manipulated mice. ..."
14.  Cerebellar purkinje cell (De Schutter and Bower 1994)
Tutorial simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell. This tutorial is based upon a GENESIS simulation of a cerebellar Purkinje cell, modeled and fine-tuned by Erik de Schutter. The tutorial assumes that you have a basic knowledge of the Purkinje cell and its synaptic inputs. It gives visual insight in how different properties as concentrations and channel conductances vary and interact within a real Purkinje cell.
15.  Cerebellar purkinje cell: interacting Kv3 and Na currents influence firing (Akemann, Knopfel 2006)
Purkinje neurons spontaneously generate action potentials in the absence of synaptic drive and thereby exert a tonic, yet plastic, input to their target cells in the deep cerebellar nuclei. Purkinje neurons express two ionic currents with biophysical properties that are specialized for high-frequency firing: resurgent sodium currents and potassium currents mediated by Kv3.3. Numerical simulations indicated that Kv3.3 increases the spontaneous firing rate via cooperation with resurgent sodium currents. We conclude that the rate of spontaneous action potential firing of Purkinje neurons is controlled by the interaction of Kv3.3 potassium currents and resurgent sodium currents. See paper for more and details.
16.  Cerebellar purkinje cell: K and Ca channels regulate APs (Miyasho et al 2001)
We adopted De Schutter and Bower's model as the starting point, then modified the descriptions of several ion channels, such as the P-type Ca channel and the delayed rectifier K channel, and added class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels to the model. Our new model reproduces most of our experimental results and supports the conclusions of our experimental study that class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels are present and functioning in the dendrites of Purkinje neurons.
17.  Cerebellar Purkinje Cell: resurgent Na current and high frequency firing (Khaliq et al 2003)
These mod files supplied by Dr Raman are for the below two references. ... we modeled action potential firing by simulating eight currents directly recorded from Purkinje cells in both wild-type and (mutant) med mice. Regular, high-frequency firing was slowed in med Purkinje neurons. In addition to disrupted sodium currents, med neurons had small but significant changes in potassium and leak currents. Simulations indicated that these modified non-sodium currents could not account for the reduced excitability of med cells but instead slightly facilitated spiking. The loss of NaV1.6-specific kinetics, however, slowed simulated spontaneous activity. Together, the data suggest that across a range of conditions, sodium currents with a resurgent component promote and accelerate firing. See papers for more and details.
18.  Cerebellum Purkinje cell: dendritic ion channels activated by climbing fibre (Ait Ouares et al 2019)
"In cerebellar Purkinje neuron (PN) dendrites, the transient depolarisation associated with a climbing fibre (CF) EPSP activates voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), voltage-gated K+ channels (VGKCs) and Ca2+ activated SK and BK K+ channels. The resulting membrane potential (Vm) and Ca2+ transients play a fundamental role in dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity of parallel fibre inputs. Here we report a detailed investigation of the kinetics of dendritic Ca2+ and K+ channels activated by CF-EPSPs, based on optical measurements of Vm and Ca2+ transients and on a single-compartment NEURON model reproducing experimental data. ... "
19.  Concentration dependent nonlinear K+ and Cl- leak current (Huang et al. 2015)
"In their seminal works on squid giant axons, Hodgkin, and Huxley approximated the membrane leak current as Ohmic, i.e., linear, since in their preparation, sub-threshold current rectification due to the influence of ionic concentration is negligible. Most studies on mammalian neurons have made the same, largely untested, assumption. Here we show that the membrane time constant and input resistance of mammalian neurons (when other major voltage-sensitive and ligand-gated ionic currents are discounted) varies non-linearly with membrane voltage, following the prediction of a Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz-based passive membrane model. ..." (see paper for details and more).
20.  Controlling KCa channels with different Ca2+ buffering models in Purkinje cell (Anwar et al. 2012)
In this work, we compare the dynamics of different buffering models during generation of a dendritic Ca2+ spike in a single compartment model of a Purkinje cell dendrite. The Ca2+ buffering models used are 1) a single Ca2+ pool, 2) two Ca2+ pools respectively for the fast and slow transients, 3) a detailed calcium model with buffers, pump (Schmidt et al., 2003), and diffusion and 4) a calcium model with buffers, pump and diffusion compensation. The parameters of single pool and double pool are tuned, using Neurofitter (Van Geit et al., 2007), to approximate the behavior of detailed calcium dynamics over range of 0.5 µM to 8 µM of intracellular calcium. The diffusion compensation is modeled using a buffer-like mechanism called DCM. To use DCM robustly for different diameter compartments, its parameters are estimated, using Neurofitter (Van Geit et al., 2007), as a function of compartment diameter (0.8 µm-20 µm).
21.  Dendritic signals command firing dynamics in a Cerebellar Purkinje Cell model (Genet et al. 2010)
This model endows the dendrites of a reconstructed Purkinje cells (PC) with the mechanism of Ca-dependent plateau potentials and spikes described in Genet, S., and B. Delord. 2002. A biophysical model of nonlinear dynamics underlying plateau potentials and calcium spikes in Purkinje cell dendrites. J. Neurophysiol. 88:2430–2444). It is a part of a comprehensive mathematical study suggesting that active electric signals in the dendrites of PC command epochs of firing and silencing of the PC soma.
22.  Dendritica (Vetter et al 2001)
Dendritica is a collection of programs for relating dendritic geometry and signal propagation. The programs are based on those used for the simulations described in: Vetter, P., Roth, A. & Hausser, M. (2001) For reprint requests and additional information please contact Dr. M. Hausser, email address: m.hausser@ucl.ac.uk
23.  Effect of voltage sensitive fluorescent proteins on neuronal excitability (Akemann et al. 2009)
"Fluorescent protein voltage sensors are recombinant proteins that are designed as genetically encoded cellular probes of membrane potential using mechanisms of voltage-dependent modulation of fluorescence. Several such proteins, including VSFP2.3 and VSFP3.1, were recently reported with reliable function in mammalian cells. ... Expression of these proteins in cell membranes is accompanied by additional dynamic membrane capacitance, ... We used recordings of sensing currents and fluorescence responses of VSFP2.3 and of VSFP3.1 to derive kinetic models of the voltage-dependent signaling of these proteins. Using computational neuron simulations, we quantitatively investigated the perturbing effects of sensing capacitance on the input/output relationship in two central neuron models, a cerebellar Purkinje and a layer 5 pyramidal neuron. ... ". The Purkinje cell model is included in ModelDB.
24.  Inverse stochastic resonance of cerebellar Purkinje cell (Buchin et al. 2016)
This code shows the simulations of the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model (http://www.scholarpedia.org/article/Adaptive_exponential_integrate-and-fire_model) at different stimulus conditions. The parameters of the model were tuned to the Purkinje cell of cerebellum to reproduce the inhibiion of these cells by noisy current injections. Similar experimental protocols were also applied to the detailed biophysical model of Purkinje cells, de Shutter & Bower (1994) model. The repository also includes the XPPaut version of the model with the corresponding bifurcation analysis.
25.  Logarithmic distributions prove that intrinsic learning is Hebbian (Scheler 2017)
"In this paper, we present data for the lognormal distributions of spike rates, synaptic weights and intrinsic excitability (gain) for neurons in various brain areas, such as auditory or visual cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, striatum, midbrain nuclei. We find a remarkable consistency of heavy-tailed, specifically lognormal, distributions for rates, weights and gains in all brain areas examined. The difference between strongly recurrent and feed-forward connectivity (cortex vs. striatum and cerebellum), neurotransmitter (GABA (striatum) or glutamate (cortex)) or the level of activation (low in cortex, high in Purkinje cells and midbrain nuclei) turns out to be irrelevant for this feature. Logarithmic scale distribution of weights and gains appears to be a general, functional property in all cases analyzed. We then created a generic neural model to investigate adaptive learning rules that create and maintain lognormal distributions. We conclusively demonstrate that not only weights, but also intrinsic gains, need to have strong Hebbian learning in order to produce and maintain the experimentally attested distributions. This provides a solution to the long-standing question about the type of plasticity exhibited by intrinsic excitability."
26.  Model of cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell LTD and LTP (Gallimore et al 2018)
Model of cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell LTD and LTP implemented in Matlab Simbiology
27.  Parallel STEPS: Large scale stochastic spatial reaction-diffusion simulat. (Chen & De Schutter 2017)
" ... In this paper, we describe an MPI-based, parallel operator-splitting implementation for stochastic spatial reaction-diffusion simulations with irregular tetrahedral meshes. The performance of our implementation is first examined and analyzed with simulations of a simple model. We then demonstrate its application to real-world research by simulating the reaction-diffusion components of a published calcium burst model in both Purkinje neuron sub-branch and full dendrite morphologies..."
28.  Phase response curves firing rate dependency of rat purkinje neurons in vitro (Couto et al 2015)
NEURON implementation of stochastic gating in the Khaliq-Raman Purkinje cell model. NEURON implementation of the De Schutter and Bower model of a Purkinje Cell. Matlab scripts to compute the Phase Response Curve (PRC). LCG configuration files to experimentally determine the PRC. Integrate and Fire models (leaky and non-leaky) implemented in BRIAN to see the influence of the PRC in a network of unconnected neurons receiving sparse common input.
29.  Spike burst-pause dynamics of Purkinje cells regulate sensorimotor adaptation (Luque et al 2019)
"Cerebellar Purkinje cells mediate accurate eye movement coordination. However, it remains unclear how oculomotor adaptation depends on the interplay between the characteristic Purkinje cell response patterns, namely tonic, bursting, and spike pauses. Here, a spiking cerebellar model assesses the role of Purkinje cell firing patterns in vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) adaptation. The model captures the cerebellar microcircuit properties and it incorporates spike-based synaptic plasticity at multiple cerebellar sites. ..."
30.  Spike timing detection in different forms of LTD (Doi et al 2005)
To understand the spike-timing detection mechanisms in cerebellar long-term depression (LTD), we developed a kinetic model of Ca dynamics within a Purkinje dendritic spine. In our kinetic simulation, IP3 was first produced via the metabotropic pathway of parallel fiber (PF) inputs, and the Ca influx in response to the climbing fiber (CF) input triggered regenerative Ca-induced Ca release from the internal stores via the IP3 receptors activated by the increased IP3. The delay in IP3 increase caused by the PF metabotropic pathway generated the optimal PF–CF interval. The Ca dynamics revealed a threshold for large Ca2 release that decreased as IP3 increased, and it coherently explained the different forms of LTD. See paper for more and details.
31.  Stability of complex spike timing-dependent plasticity in cerebellar learning (Roberts 2007)
"Dynamics of spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity are analyzed for excitatory and inhibitory synapses onto cerebellar Purkinje cells. The purpose of this study is to place theoretical constraints on candidate synaptic learning rules that determine the changes in synaptic efficacy due to pairing complex spikes with presynaptic spikes in parallel fibers and inhibitory interneurons. ..."
32.  Stochastic calcium mechanisms cause dendritic calcium spike variability (Anwar et al. 2013)
" ... In single Purkinje cells, spontaneous and synaptically evoked dendritic calcium bursts come in a variety of shapes with a variable number of spikes. The mechanisms causing this variability have never been investigated thoroughly. In this study, a detailed computational model employing novel simulation routines is applied to identify the roles that stochastic ion channels, spatial arrangements of ion channels and stochastic intracellular calcium have towards producing calcium burst variability. … Our findings suggest that stochastic intracellular calcium mechanisms play a crucial role in dendritic calcium spike generation and are, therefore, an essential consideration in studies of neuronal excitability and plasticity."
33.  Stochastic ion channels and neuronal morphology (Cannon et al. 2010)
"... We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. ..." The code is downloadable and more information is available at <a href="http://www.psics.org/">http://www.psics.org/</a>
34.  Using Strahler`s analysis to reduce realistic models (Marasco et al, 2013)
Building on our previous work (Marasco et al., (2012)), we present a general reduction method based on Strahler's analysis of neuron morphologies. We show that, without any fitting or tuning procedures, it is possible to map any morphologically and biophysically accurate neuron model into an equivalent reduced version. Using this method for Purkinje cells, we demonstrate how run times can be reduced up to 200-fold, while accurately taking into account the effects of arbitrarily located and activated synaptic inputs.
35.  Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex model in Matlab (Clopath at al. 2014)
" ... We then introduce a minimal model that consists of learning at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells with the help of the climbing fibers. Although the minimal model reproduces the behavior of the wild-type animals and is analytically tractable, it fails at reproducing the behavior of mutant mice and the electrophysiology data. Therefore, we build a detailed model involving plasticity at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells' synapse guided by climbing fibers, feedforward inhibition of Purkinje cells, and plasticity at the mossy fiber to vestibular nuclei neuron synapse. The detailed model reproduces both the behavioral and electrophysiological data of both the wild-type and mutant mice and allows for experimentally testable predictions. "
36.  Voltage- and Branch-specific Climbing Fiber Responses in Purkinje Cells (Zang et al 2018)
"Climbing fibers (CFs) provide instructive signals driving cerebellar learning, but mechanisms causing the variable CF responses in Purkinje cells (PCs) are not fully understood. Using a new experimentally validated PC model, we unveil the ionic mechanisms underlying CF-evoked distinct spike waveforms on different parts of the PC. We demonstrate that voltage can gate both the amplitude and the spatial range of CF-evoked Ca2+ influx by the availability of K+ currents. ... The voltage- and branch-specific CF responses can increase dendritic computational capacity and enable PCs to actively integrate CF signals."

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