Models that contain the Neuron : Hippocampus CA1 interneuron oriens alveus GABA cell

(Oriens Alveus and O-LM interneurons)
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    Models   Description
1.  Active dendrites and spike propagation in a hippocampal interneuron (Saraga et al 2003)
We create multi-compartment models of an Oriens-Lacunosum/Moleculare (O-LM) hippocampal interneuron using passive properties, channel kinetics, densities and distributions specific to this cell type, and explore its signaling characteristics. We find that spike initiation depends on both location and amount of input, as well as the intrinsic properties of the interneuron. Distal synaptic input always produces strong back-propagating spikes whereas proximal input could produce both forward and back-propagating spikes depending on the input strength. Please see paper for more details.
2.  CA1 interneuron: K currents (Lien et al 2002)
NEURON mod files for slow and fast K-DR, and K-A potassium currents in inhibitory interneurones of stratum oriens-alveus of the hippocampal CA1 region.
3.  CA1 oriens alveus interneurons: signaling properties (Minneci et al. 2007)
The model supports the experimental findings showing that the dynamic interaction between cells with various firing patterns could differently affect GABAergic signaling, leading to a wide range of interneuronal communication within the hippocampal network.
4.  Computational modelling of channelrhodopsin-2 photocurrent characteristics (Stefanescu et al. 2013)
The codes are directly related with the results presented in the manuscript; in brief, it is a computational investigation on the effects of optogenetic actuation on excitatory and inhibitory neurons when 3- and 4- state model is used to implement the ChR2 kinetics. Different parameters of optostimulation are investigated and the results compared with experimental data previously published by other research groups.
5.  Effects of increasing CREB on storage and recall processes in a CA1 network (Bianchi et al. 2014)
Several recent results suggest that boosting the CREB pathway improves hippocampal-dependent memory in healthy rodents and restores this type of memory in an AD mouse model. However, not much is known about how CREB-dependent neuronal alterations in synaptic strength, excitability and LTP can boost memory formation in the complex architecture of a neuronal network. Using a model of a CA1 microcircuit, we investigate whether hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron properties altered by increasing CREB activity may contribute to improve memory storage and recall. With a set of patterns presented to a network, we find that the pattern recall quality under AD-like conditions is significantly better when boosting CREB function with respect to control. The results are robust and consistent upon increasing the synaptic damage expected by AD progression, supporting the idea that the use of CREB-based therapies could provide a new approach to treat AD.
6.  Gamma and theta rythms in biophysical models of hippocampus circuits (Kopell et al. 2011)
" ... the main rhythms displayed by the hippocampus, the gamma (30–90 Hz) and theta (4–12 Hz) rhythms. We concentrate on modeling in vitro experiments, but with an eye toward possible in vivo implications. ... We use simpler biophysical models; all cells have a single compartment only, and the interneurons are restricted to two types: fast-spiking (FS) basket cells and oriens lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM) cells. ... , we aim not so much at reproducing dynamics in great detail, but at clarifying the essential mechanisms underlying the production of the rhythms and their interactions (Kopell, 2005). ..."
7.  High frequency oscillations in a hippocampal computational model (Stacey et al. 2009)
"... Using a physiological computer model of hippocampus, we investigate random synaptic activity (noise) as a potential initiator of HFOs (high-frequency oscillations). We explore parameters necessary to produce these oscillations and quantify the response using the tools of stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR). ... Our results show that, under normal coupling conditions, synaptic noise was able to produce gamma (30–100 Hz) frequency oscillations. Synaptic noise generated HFOs in the ripple range (100–200 Hz) when the network had parameters similar to pathological findings in epilepsy: increased gap junctions or recurrent synaptic connections, loss of inhibitory interneurons such as basket cells, and increased synaptic noise. ... We propose that increased synaptic noise and physiological coupling mechanisms are sufficient to generate gamma oscillations and that pathologic changes in noise and coupling similar to those in epilepsy can produce abnormal ripples."
8.  Hippocampal CA1 NN with spontaneous theta, gamma: full scale & network clamp (Bezaire et al 2016)
This model is a full-scale, biologically constrained rodent hippocampal CA1 network model that includes 9 cells types (pyramidal cells and 8 interneurons) with realistic proportions of each and realistic connectivity between the cells. In addition, the model receives realistic numbers of afferents from artificial cells representing hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortical layer III. The model is fully scaleable and parallelized so that it can be run at small scale on a personal computer or large scale on a supercomputer. The model network exhibits spontaneous theta and gamma rhythms without any rhythmic input. The model network can be perturbed in a variety of ways to better study the mechanisms of CA1 network dynamics. Also see online code at http://bitbucket.org/mbezaire/ca1 and further information at http://mariannebezaire.com/models/ca1
9.  Modulation of septo-hippocampal theta activity by GABAA receptors (Hajos et al. 2004)
Theta frequency oscillation of the septo-hippocampal system has been considered as a prominent activity associated with cognitive function and affective processes. ... In the present experiments we applied a combination of computational and physiological techniques to explore the functional role of GABAA receptors in theta oscillation. ... In parallel to these experimental observations, a computational model has been constructed by implementing a septal GABA neuron model with a CA1 hippocampal model containing three types of neurons (including oriens and basket interneurons and pyramidal cells; latter modeled by multicompartmental techniques; for detailed model description with network parameters see online addendum: http://geza.kzoo.edu/theta). This connectivity made the network capable of simulating the responses of the septo-hippocampal circuitry to the modulation of GABAA transmission, and the presently described computational model proved suitable to reveal several aspects of pharmacological modulation of GABAA receptors. In addition, computational findings indicated different roles of distinctively located GABAA receptors in theta generation.
10.  Network recruitment to coherent oscillations in a hippocampal model (Stacey et al. 2011)
"... Here we demonstrate, via a detailed computational model, a mechanism whereby physiological noise and coupling initiate oscillations and then recruit neighboring tissue, in a manner well described by a combination of Stochastic Resonance and Coherence Resonance. We develop a novel statistical method to quantify recruitment using several measures of network synchrony. This measurement demonstrates that oscillations spread via preexisting network connections such as interneuronal connections, recurrent synapses, and gap junctions, provided that neighboring cells also receive sufficient inputs in the form of random synaptic noise. ..."
11.  O-LM interneuron model (Lawrence et al. 2006)
Exploring the kinetics and distribution of the muscarinic potassium channel, IM, in 2 O-LM interneuron morphologies. Modulation of the ion channel by drugs such as XE991 (antagonist) and retigabine (agonist) are simulated in the models to examine the role of IM in spiking properties.

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