Models that contain the Model Type : Axon

Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1. Earthworm medial giant fiber conduction velocity across electrical synapses (Heller, Crisp 2016)
The earthworm medial giant fiber (MGF) is composed of many neurons electrically coupled by high fidelity gap junctions. In addition, the MGF exhibits a distinct taper in diameter from anterior to posterior. The role of these gap junctions and their interaction with axonal taper in predicting conduction velocity has not been studied closely in the annelid. A model of an electrical synapse in the MGF was created to investigate the influence of, and interaction between, these two parameters.
2. A detailed Purkinje cell model (Masoli et al 2015)
The Purkinje cell is one of the most complex type of neuron in the central nervous system and is well known for its massive dendritic tree. The initiation of the action potential was theorized to be due to the high calcium channels presence in the dendritic tree but, in the last years, this idea was revised. In fact, the Axon Initial Segment, the first section of the axon was seen to be critical for the spontaneous generation of action potentials. The model reproduces the behaviours linked to the presence of this fundamental sections and the interplay with the other parts of the neuron.
3. A model of the T-junction of a C-fiber sensory neuron (Sundt et al. 2015)
The effect of geometry and ionic mechanisms on spike propagation through the T-junction of an unmyelinated sensory neuron.
4. Action Potential initiation and backpropagation in Neocortical L5 Pyramidal Neuron (Hu et al. 2009)
"...Previous computational studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the role of Na+ channel density and biophysical properties in action potential initiation as a result of inconsistent estimates of channel density. Our modeling studies integrated the immunostaining and electrophysiological results and showed that the lowest threshold for action potential initiation at the distal AIS was largely determined by the density of low-threshold Nav1.6 channels ... Distinct from the function of Nav1.6 channel, the Nav1.2 channel may control action potential backpropagation because of its high density at the proximal AIS and high threshold. ... In conclusion, distal AIS accumulation of Nav1.6 channels determines the low threshold for action potential initiation; whereas proximal AIS accumulation of Nav1.2 channels sets the threshold for the generation of somatodendritic potentials and ensures action potential backpropagation to the soma and dendrites. Thus, Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 channels serve distinct functions in action potential initiation and backpropagation."
5. AP back-prop. explains threshold variability and rapid rise (McCormick et al. 2007, Yu et al. 2008)
This simple axon-soma model explained how the rapid rising phase in the somatic spike is derived from the propagated axon initiated spike, and how the somatic spike threshold variance is affected by spike propagation.
6. Axon growth model (Diehl et al. 2016)
The model describes the elongation over time of an axon from a small neurite to its steady-state length. The elongation depends on the availability of tubulin dimers in the growth cone. The dimers are produced in the soma and then transported along the axon to the growth cone. Mathematically the model consists of a partial differential equation coupled with two nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The code implements a spatial scaling to deal with the growing (and shrinking) domain and a temporal scaling to deal with evolutions on different time scales. Further, the numerical scheme is chosen to fully utilize the structure of the problems. To summarize, this results in fast and reliable axon growth simulations.
7. Axonal HH-model for temperature stimulation (Fribance et al 2016)
"... To analyze the temperature effect, our study modified the classical HH axonal model by incorporating a membrane capacitance-temperature relationship. The modified model successfully simulated the generation and propagation of action potentials induced by a rapid increase in local temperature when the Curie temperature of membrane capacitance is below 40 °C, while the classical model failed to simulate the axonal excitation by temperature stimulation. The new model predicts that a rapid increase in local temperature produces a rapid increase in membrane capacitance, which causes an inward membrane current across the membrane capacitor strong enough to depolarize the membrane and generate an action potential. ..."
8. Biologically Constrained Basal Ganglia model (BCBG model) (Lienard, Girard 2014)
We studied the physiology and function of the basal ganglia through the design of mean-field models of the whole basal ganglia. The parameterizations are optimized with multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to respect best a collection of numerous anatomical data and electrophysiological data. The main outcomes of our study are: • The strength of the GPe to GPi/SNr connection does not support opposed activities in the GPe and GPi/SNr. • STN and MSN target more the GPe than the GPi/SNr. • Selection arises from the structure of the basal ganglia, without properly segregated direct and indirect pathways and without specific inputs from pyramidal tract neurons of the cortex. Selection is enhanced when the projection from GPe to GPi/SNr has a diffuse pattern.
9. CA1 pyramidal cell: reconstructed axonal arbor and failures at weak gap junctions (Vladimirov 2011)
Model of pyramidal CA1 cells connected by gap junctions in their axons. Cell geometry is based on anatomical reconstruction of rat CA1 cell (NeuroMorpho.Org ID: NMO_00927) with long axonal arbor. Model init_2cells.hoc shows failures of second spike propagation in a spike doublet, depending on conductance of an axonal gap junction. Model init_ring.hoc shows that spike failure result in reentrant oscillations of a spike in a loop of axons connected by gap junctions, where one gap junction is weak. The paper shows that in random networks of axons connected by gap junctions, oscillations are driven by single pacemaker loop of axons. The shortest loop, around which a spike can travel, is the most likely pacemaker. This principle allows us to predict the frequency of oscillations from network connectivity and visa versa. We propose that this type of oscillations corresponds to so-called fast ripples in epileptic hippocampus.
10. CA1 pyramidal neuron: functional significance of axonal Kv7 channels (Shah et al. 2008)
The model used in this paper confirmed the experimental findings suggesting that axonal Kv7 channels are critically and uniquely required for determining the inherent spontaneous firing of hippocampal CA1 pyramids, independently of alterations in synaptic activity. The model predicts that the axonal Kv7 density could be 3-5 times that at the soma.
11. Cerebellum granule cell FHF (Dover et al. 2016)
"Neurons in vertebrate central nervous systems initiate and conduct sodium action potentials in distinct subcellular compartments that differ architecturally and electrically. Here, we report several unanticipated passive and active properties of the cerebellar granule cell's unmyelinated axon. Whereas spike initiation at the axon initial segment relies on sodium channel (Nav)-associated fibroblast growth factor homologous factor (FHF) proteins to delay Nav inactivation, distal axonal Navs show little FHF association or FHF requirement for high-frequency transmission, velocity and waveforms of conducting action potentials. ...'
12. Compartmental models of growing neurites (Graham and van Ooyen 2004)
Simulator for models of neurite outgrowth. The principle model is a biophysical model of neurite outgrowth described in Graham and van Ooyen (2004). In the model, branching depends on the concentration of a branch-determining substance in each terminal segment. The substance is produced in the cell body and is transported by active transport and diffusion to the terminals. The model reveals that transport-limited effects may give rise to the same modulation of branching as indicated by the stochastic BESTL model. Different limitations arise if transport is dominated by active transport or by diffusion.
13. Conduction in uniform myelinated axons (Moore et al 1978)
Examines the relative sensitivity of the velocity of impulse propagation to changes in nodal and internodal parameters.
14. Continuous time stochastic model for neurite branching (van Elburg 2011)
"In this paper we introduce a continuous time stochastic neurite branching model closely related to the discrete time stochastic BES-model. The discrete time BES-model is underlying current attempts to simulate cortical development, but is difficult to analyze. The new continuous time formulation facilitates analytical treatment thus allowing us to examine the structure of the model more closely. ..."
15. Continuum model of tubulin-driven neurite elongation (Graham et al 2006)
This model investigates the elongation over time of a single developing neurite (axon or dendrite). Our neurite growth model describes the elongation of a single,unbranched neurite in terms of the rate of extension of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The cytoskeleton is not explicitly modelled, but its construction is assumed to depend on the available free tubulin at the growing neurite tip.
16. Current flow during PAP in squid axon at diameter change (Joyner et al 1980)
From the paper abstract: An impulse ... sees an increased electrical load at regions of increasing diameter or at branch points with certain morphologies. We present here theoretical and experimental studies on the changes in membrane current and axial current associated with diameter changes. The theoretical studies were done with numerical solutions for cable equations that were generalized to include a varying diameter; the Hodgkin-Huxley equations were used to represent the membrane properties. ... As an action potential approaches a region of increased electrical load, the action potential amplitude and rate of rise decrease, but there is a marked increase in the magnitude of the inward sodium current. ... (See paper for more details.)
17. Demyelinated and remyelinating axon conductances (Hines, Shrager 1991)
Hines, Michael and Peter Shrager (1991). A computational test of the requirements for conduction in demyelinated axons. J. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience. 3 81--93.
18. Dentate granule cell: mAHP & sAHP; SK & Kv7/M channels (Mateos-Aparicio et al., 2014)
The model is based on that of Aradi & Holmes (1999; Journal of Computational Neuroscience 6, 215-235). It was used to help understand the contribution of M and SK channels to the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) following one or seven spikes, as well as the contribution of M channels to the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP). We found that SK channels are the main determinants of the mAHP, in contrast to CA1 pyramidal cells where the mAHP is primarily caused by the opening of M channels. The model reproduced these experimental results, but we were unable to reproduce the effects of the M-channel blocker XE991 on the sAHP. It is suggested that either the XE991-sensitive component of the sAHP is not due to M channels, or that when contributing to the sAHP, these channels operate in a mode different from that associated with the mAHP.
19. Dipolar extracellular potentials generated by axonal projections (McColgan et al 2017)
" ... Here, we established experimentally and theoretically that contributions of axons to EFPs can be significant. Modeling action potentials propagating along axons, we showed that EFPs were prominent in the presence of terminal zones where axons branch and terminate in close succession, as found in many brain regions. Our models predicted a dipolar far field and a polarity reversal at the center of the terminal zone. ..."
20. Direct recruitment of S1 pyramidal cells and interneurons via ICMS (Overstreet et al., 2013)
Study of the pyramidal cells and interneurons recruited by intracortical microstimulation in primary somatosensory cortex. Code includes morphological models for seven types of pyramidal cells and eight types of interneurons, NEURON code to simulate ICMS, and an artificial reconstruction of a 3D slab of cortex implemented in MATLAB.
21. Effect of trp-like current on APs during exposure to sinusoidal voltage (Chen et al. 2010)
"... Previous work showed that magnetic electrical field-induced antinoceptive action is mediated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents. In this study, a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, in which TRP-like current (I-TRP) was incorporated, was implemented to predict the firing behavior of action potentials (APs), as the model neuron was exposed to sinusoidal changes in externally-applied voltage. ... Our simulation results suggest that modulation of TRP-like channels functionally expressed in small-diameter peripheral sensory neurons should be an important mechanism through which it can contribute to the firing pattern of APs."
22. Ephaptic interactions in olfactory nerve (Bokil et al 2001)
Bokil, H., Laaris, N., Blinder, K., Ennis, M., and Keller, A. (2001) Ephaptic interactions in the mammalian olfactory system. J. Neurosci. 21:RC173(1-5)
23. Explaining pathological changes in axonal excitability by dynamical analysis (Coggan et al. 2011)
"... To help decipher the biophysical basis for ‘paroxysmal’ spiking, we replicated afterdischarge (i.e. continued spiking after a brief stimulus) in a minimal conductance-based axon model. ... A perturbation could abruptly switch the system between two (quasi-)stable attractor states: rest and repetitive spiking. ... Initiation of afterdischarge was explained by activation of the persistent inward current forcing the system to cross a saddle point that separates the basins of attraction associated with each attractor. Termination of afterdischarge was explained by the attractor associated with repetitive spiking being destroyed. ... The model also explains other features of paroxysmal symptoms, including temporal summation and refractoriness."
24. Globus pallidus neuron models with differing dendritic Na channel expression (Edgerton et al., 2010)
A set of 9 multi-compartmental rat GP neuron models (585 compartments) differing only in their expression of dendritic fast sodium channels were compared in their synaptic integration properties. Dendritic fast sodium channels were found to increase the importance of distal synapses (both excitatory AND inhibitory), increase spike timing variability with in vivo-like synaptic input, and make the model neurons highly sensitive to clustered synchronous excitation.
25. GPi/GPe neuron models (Johnson and McIntyre 2008)
Model files for two types of non-human primate neurons used in the paper: simplified versions of 1) a GPi neuron and 2) a GPe axon collateralizing in GPi en route to STN.
26. High frequency oscillations induced in three gap-junction coupled neurons (Tseng et al. 2008)
Here we showed experimentally that high frequency oscillations (up to 600 Hz) were easily induced in a purely gap-junction coupled network by simple two stimuli with very short interval. The root cause is that the second elicited spike suffered from slow propagation speed and failure to transmit through a low-conductance junction. Similiar results were also obtained in these simulation.
27. Hypocretin and Locus Coeruleus model neurons (Carter et al 2012)
Conductance based model of the hypocretin neurons (HCRT) and another one of the Locus Coeruleus one (LC). The HCRT drive the LCs via the HCRT receptor on the LCs. The LCs lead to the awakening of the mice if the number of spikes raises over 10 spikes in 10 seconds window.
28. Intracortical synaptic potential modulation by presynaptic somatic potential (Shu et al. 2006, 2007)
" ... Here we show that the voltage fluctuations associated with dendrosomatic synaptic activity propagate significant distances along the axon, and that modest changes in the somatic membrane potential of the presynaptic neuron modulate the amplitude and duration of axonal action potentials and, through a Ca21- dependent mechanism, the average amplitude of the postsynaptic potential evoked by these spikes. These results indicate that synaptic activity in the dendrite and soma controls not only the pattern of action potentials generated, but also the amplitude of the synaptic potentials that these action potentials initiate in local cortical circuits, resulting in synaptic transmission that is a mixture of triggered and graded (analogue) signals."
29. Leech S Cell: Modulation of Excitability by Serotonin (Burrell and Crisp 2008)
Serotonergic modulation of the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) contributes to the regulation of the excitability of the leech S cell, a neuron critical for sensitization of the shortening reflex. Pharmacological and physiological data suggest that three currents contribute to the S cell's afterhyperpolarization: a charybdotoxin-sensitive, fast calcium-dependent potassium current (fAHP); a tubocurare-sensitive, calcium-dependent potassium current (mAHP); and, a saxitoxin-sensitive, afterdepolarization current (ADP). This single-compartment model of the S cell is constructed using fAHP, mAHP and ADP currents, and shows that reduction of the conductances to mimic the effects of serotonin is sufficient to enhance excitability (repetitive firing).
30. Lillie Transition: onset of saltatory conduction in myelinating axons (Young et al. 2013)
Included are the NEURON (.hoc) files needed to generate the data used in our Young, Castelfranco, Hartline (2013) paper. The resulting .dat files are in the same folder as the MATLAB (.m) files that are used to sort the data.
31. Mechanisms of very fast oscillations in axon networks coupled by gap junctions (Munro, Borgers 2010)
Axons connected by gap junctions can produce very fast oscillations (VFOs, > 80 Hz) when stimulated randomly at a low rate. The models here explore the mechanisms of VFOs that can be seen in an axonal plexus, (Munro & Borgers, 2009): a large network model of an axonal plexus, small network models of axons connected by gap junctions, and an implementation of the model underlying figure 12 in Traub et al. (1999) . The large network model consists of 3,072 5-compartment axons connected in a random network. The 5-compartment axons are the 5 axonal compartments from the CA3 pyramidal cell model in Traub et al. (1994) with a fixed somatic voltage. The random network has the same parameters as the random network in Traub et al. (1999), and axons are stimulated randomly via a Poisson process with a rate of 2/s/axon. The small network models simulate waves propagating through small networks of axons connected by gap junctions to study how local connectivity affects the refractory period.
32. Multiscale model of olfactory receptor neuron in mouse (Dougherty 2009)
Collection of XPP (.ode) files simulating the signal transduction (slow) and action potential (fast) currents in the olfactory receptor neuron of mouse. Collection contains model configured for dual odorant pulse delivery and model configured for prolonged odorant delivery. For those interested more in transduction processes, each whole cell recording model comes with a counter part file configured to show just the slow transduction current for ease of use and convenience. These transduction-only models typically run faster than the full multi-scale models but do not demonstrate action potentials.
33. Myelinated axon conduction velocity (Brill et al 1977)
Examines conduction velocity as function of internodal length.
34. Neocort. pyramidal cells subthreshold somatic voltage controls spike propagation (Munro Kopell 2012)
There is suggestive evidence that pyramidal cell axons in neocortex may be coupled by gap junctions into an ``axonal plexus" capable of generating Very Fast Oscillations (VFOs) with frequencies exceeding 80 Hz. It is not obvious, however, how a pyramidal cell in such a network could control its output when action potentials are free to propagate from the axons of other pyramidal cells into its own axon. We address this problem by means of simulations based on 3D reconstructions of pyramidal cells from rat somatosensory cortex. We show that somatic depolarization enables propagation via gap junctions into the initial segment and main axon, while somatic hyperpolarization disables it. We show further that somatic voltage cannot effectively control action potential propagation through gap junctions on minor collaterals; action potentials may therefore propagate freely from such collaterals regardless of somatic voltage. In previous work, VFOs are all but abolished during the hyperpolarization phase of slow-oscillations induced by anesthesia in vivo. This finding constrains the density of gap junctions on collaterals in our model and suggests that axonal sprouting due to cortical lesions may result in abnormally high gap junction density on collaterals, leading in turn to excessive VFO activity and hence to epilepsy via kindling.
35. Neurite: electrophysiological-mechanical coupling simulation framework (Garcia-Grajales et al 2015)
Neurite simulates the electrical signal propagation in myelinated and unmyelinated axons, and in dendritic trees under mechanical loading. Two different solvers are available (explicit and implicit) with sequential (CPU) and parallel (GPUs) versions
36. Nodes of Ranvier with left-shifted Nav channels (Boucher et al. 2012)
The two programs CLSRanvier.f and propagation.f simulate the excitability of a myelinated axon with injured nodes of Ranvier. The injury is simulated as the Coupled Left Shift (CLS) of the activation(V) and inactivation(V) (availability) of a fraction of Nav channels.
37. Optical stimulation of a channelrhodopsin-2 positive pyramidal neuron model (Foutz et al 2012)
A computational tool to explore the underlying principles of optogenetic neural stimulation. This "light-neuron" model consists of theoretical representations of the light dynamics generated by a fiber optic in brain tissue, coupled to a multicompartment cable model of a cortical pyramidal neuron (Hu et al. 2009, ModelDB #123897) embedded with channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) membrane dynamics. Simulations predict that the activation threshold is sensitive to many of the properties of ChR2 (density, conductivity, and kinetics), tissue medium (scattering and absorbance), and the fiber-optic light source (diameter and numerical aperture). This model system represents a scientific instrument to characterize the effects of optogenetic neuromodulation, as well as an engineering design tool to help guide future development of optogenetic technology.
38. Parametric computation and persistent gamma in a cortical model (Chambers et al. 2012)
Using the Traub et al (2005) model of the cortex we determined how 33 synaptic strength parameters control gamma oscillations. We used fractional factorial design to reduce the number of runs required to 4096. We found an expected multiplicative interaction between parameters.
39. Prediction for the presence of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in myelinated central axons (Brown 2003)
"The objective of this current study was to investigate whether voltage gated Ca(2+) channels are present on axons of the adult rat optic nerve (RON). Simulations of axonal excitability using a Hodgkin-Huxley based one-compartment model incorporating I(Na), I(K) and leak currents were used to predict conditions under which the potential contribution of a Ca(2+) current to an evoked action potential could be measured. ... , as predicted by the simulation, reducing the repolarizing effect of I(K) by adding the K(+) channel blocker 4-AP revealed a Ca(2+) component on the repolarizing phase of the action potential that was blocked by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitor nifedipine."
40. Preserving axosomatic spiking features despite diverse dendritic morphology (Hay et al., 2013)
The authors found that linearly scaling the ion channel conductance densities of a reference model with the conductance load in 28 3D reconstructed layer 5 thick-tufted pyramidal cells was necessary to match the experimental statistics of these cells electrical firing properties.
41. Principles of Computational Modelling in Neuroscience (Book) (Sterratt et al. 2011)
"... This book provides a step-by-step account of how to model the neuron and neural circuitry to understand the nervous system at all levels, from ion channels to networks. Starting with a simple model of the neuron as an electrical circuit, gradually more details are added to include the effects of neuronal morphology, synapses, ion channels and intracellular signaling. The principle of abstraction is explained through chapters on simplifying models, and how simplified models can be used in networks. This theme is continued in a final chapter on modeling the development of the nervous system. Requiring an elementary background in neuroscience and some high school mathematics, this textbook is an ideal basis for a course on computational neuroscience."
42. Response properties of neocort. neurons to temporally modulated noisy inputs (Koendgen et al. 2008)
Neocortical neurons are classified by current–frequency relationship. This is a static description and it may be inadequate to interpret neuronal responses to time-varying stimuli. Theoretical studies (Brunel et al., 2001; Fourcaud-Trocmé et al. 2003; Fourcaud-Trocmé and Brunel 2005; Naundorf et al. 2005) suggested that single-cell dynamical response properties are necessary to interpret ensemble responses to fast input transients. Further, it was shown that input-noise linearizes and boosts the response bandwidth, and that the interplay between the barrage of noisy synaptic currents and the spike-initiation mechanisms determine the dynamical properties of the firing rate. In order to allow a reader to explore such simulations, we prepared a simple NEURON implementation of the experiments performed in Köndgen et al., 2008 (see also Fourcaud-Trocmé al. 2003; Fourcaud-Trocmé and Brunel 2005). In addition, we provide sample MATLAB routines for exploring the sandwich model proposed in Köndgen et al., 2008, employing a simple frequdency-domain filtering. The simulations and the MATLAB routines are based on the linear response properties of layer 5 pyramidal cells estimated by injecting a superposition of a small-amplitude sinusoidal wave and a background noise, as in Köndgen et al., 2008.
43. Selective control of cortical axonal spikes by a slowly inactivating K+ current (Shu et al. 2007)
We discovered a low-threshold, slowly inactivating K+ current, containing Kv1.2 alpha subunits, in axon initial segment, playing a key role in the modulation of spike threshold and spike duration as well as the spike timing in prefrontal cortex layer V pyramidal cell of ferrets and rats. A kd.mod file implements this D current and put it in the axonal model: Neuron_Dcurrent.hoc. Run the model to see the gradual modulation effect over seconds on spike shape.
44. Spike propagation and bouton activation in terminal arborizations (Luscher, Shiner 1990)
Action potential propagation in axons with bifurcations involving short collaterals with synaptic boutons has been simulated ... The architecture of the terminal arborizations has a profound effect on the activation pattern of synapses, suggesting that terminal arborizations not only distribute neural information to postsynaptic cells but may also be able to process neural information presynaptically. Please see paper for details.
45. Spike trains in Hodgkin–Huxley model and ISIs of acupuncture manipulations (Wang et al. 2008)
The Hodgkin-Huxley equations (HH) are parameterized by a number of parameters and shows a variety of qualitatively different behaviors depending on the parameter values. Under stimulation of an external periodic voltage, the ISIs (interspike intervals) of a HH model are investigated in this work, while the frequency of the voltage is taken as the controlling parameter. As well-known, the science of acupuncture and moxibustion is an important component of Traditional Chinese Medicine with a long history. Although there are a number of different acupuncture manipulations, the method for distinguishing them is rarely investigated. With the idea of ISI, we study the electrical signal time series at the spinal dorsal horn produced by three different acupuncture manipulations in Zusanli point and present an effective way to distinguish them.
46. Spikelet generation and AP initiation in a L5 neocortical pyr neuron (Michalikova et al. 2016) Fig 1
The article by Michalikova et al. (2016) explores the generation of spikelets in cortical pyramidal neurons. The model cell, adapted from Hu et al. (2009), is a layer V pyramidal neuron. The cell is stimulated by fluctuating synaptic inputs and generates somatic APs and spikelets in response. The spikelets are initiated as APs at the AIS that do not activate the soma.
47. Spikelet generation and AP initiation in a simplified pyr neuron (Michalikova et al. 2016) Fig 3
The article by Michalikova et al. (2016) explores the generation of spikelets in cortical pyramidal neurons. This package contains code for simulating the model with simplified morphology shown in Figs 3 and S2.
48. Spinal Motor Neuron (McIntyre et al 2002)
Simulation of peripheral nervous system (PNS) mylelinated axon. This model is described in detail in: McIntyre CC, Richardson AG, and Grill WM.(2002)
49. Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (LabAXON)
The classic HH model of squid axon membrane implemented in LabAXON. Hodgkin, A.L., Huxley, A.F. (1952)
50. Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (NEURON)
The classic HH model of squid axon membrane implemented in NEURON. Hodgkin, A.L., Huxley, A.F. (1952)
51. Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (SBML, XPP, other)
An SBML (and related XPP and other formats) implementation of the classic HH paper is available in the BIOMODELS database. See far below for links.
52. Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) (SNNAP)
The classic HH model of squid axon membrane implemented in SNNAP. Hodgkin, A.L., Huxley, A.F. (1952)
53. Squid axon (Hodgkin, Huxley 1952) used in (Chen et al 2010) (R language)
"... Previous work showed that magnetic electrical field-induced antinoceptive action is mediated by activation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents. In this study, a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model, in which TRP-like current (I-TRP) was incorporated, was implemented to predict the firing behavior of action potentials (APs), as the model neuron was exposed to sinusoidal changes in externally-applied voltage. ... Our simulation results suggest that modulation of TRP-like channels functionally expressed in small-diameter peripheral sensory neurons should be an important mechanism through which it can contribute to the firing pattern of APs."
54. Squid axon: Bifurcation analysis of mode-locking (Lee & Kim 2006) (Gangal & Dar 2014)
The model was built with the purpose of finding mode lockings between the input sinusoidal current frequency and the output frequency. Phase plase plane analysis, spike statistics, mode locking formulation etc. can be done with the help of the model. Any additional functionality can be added as the base code return the correct action potential values.
55. State dependent drug binding to sodium channels in the dentate gyrus (Thomas & Petrou 2013)
A Markov model of sodium channels was developed that includes drug binding to fast inactivated states. This was incorporated into a model of the dentate gyrus to investigate the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on neuron and network properties.
56. Strategy for kinase transport by microtubules to nerve terminals (Koon et al. 2014)
This model was used in the computational study of the strategies of protein transport in the context of JNK (c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase) transport along microtubules to the terminals of neuronal cells. Diffusion governs the first strategy. In the second strategy, proteins of the JNK signaling cascade bind to scaffolds and the whole protein-scaffold cargo is transported by kinesin motors along microtubules. Using the results from the simulations, the two distinct strategies for transport were compared.
57. Striatal NN model of MSNs and FSIs investigated effects of dopamine depletion (Damodaran et al 2015)
This study investigates the mechanisms that are affected in the striatal network after dopamine depletion and identifies potential therapeutic targets to restore normal activity.
58. Submyelin Potassium accumulation in Subthalamic neuron (STN) axons (Bellinger et al. 2008)
"To better understand the direct effects of DBS (Deep brain stimulation) on central neurons, a computational model of a myelinated axon has been constructed which includes the effects of K+ accumulation within the peri-axonal space. Using best estimates of anatomic and electrogenic model parameters for in vivo STN axons, the model predicts a functional block along the axon due to K+ accumulation in the submyelin space. ... These results suggest that therapeutic DBS of the STN likely results in a functional block for many STN axons, although a subset of STN axons may also be activated at the stimulating frequency. "
59. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
60. Temperature-Sensitive conduction at axon branch points (Westerfield et al 1978)
Propagation of impulses through branching regions of squid axons was examined experimentally and with computer simulations. The ratio of postbranch/prebranch diameters at which propagation failed was very sensitive to temperature.
61. Two Models for synaptic input statistics for the MSO neuron model (Jercog et al. 2010)
The model is a point neuron model with ionic currents from Rothman & Mannis (2003) and with an update of the low threshold potassium current (IKLT) measured in-vitro by Mathews & Jercog et al (2010). This model in conjunction with the synaptic input models presented here has been used to gain insight into mechanisms that account for experimentally observed asymmetries in ITD tuning (Brand et al, 2002). Asymmetry and displacement of the ITD response function is achieved in the model by the interplay between asymmetry of the excitatory inputs arriving from the two sides and the precise voltage dependent activation of IKLT. In Jercog et al (2010) we propose two different mathematical ways, physiologically plausible scenarios, of generating the asymmetry in the bilateral synaptic input events. Here, we present two models for simulating the stochastic synaptic input trains.
62. Vertical System (VS) tangential cells network model (Trousdale et al. 2014)
Network model of the VS tangential cell system, with 10 cells per hemisphere. Each cell is a two compartment model with one compartment for dendrites and one for the axon. The cells are coupled through axonal gap junctions. The code allows to simulate responses of the VS network to a variety of visual stimuli to investigate coding as a function of gap junction strength.
63. Xenopus Myelinated Neuron (Frankenhaeuser, Huxley 1964)
Frankenhaeuser, B. and Huxley, A. F. (1964), The action potential in the myelinated nerve fiber of Xenopus Laevis as computed on the basis of voltage clamp data. J. Physiol. 171: 302-315. See README file for more information.

Re-display model names without descriptions