Models that contain the Implementer : Golomb, David [golomb at bgu.ac.il]

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    Models   Description
1.  CA1 pyramidal cell: I_NaP and I_M contributions to somatic bursting (Golomb et al 2006)
To study the mechanisms of bursting, we have constructed a conductance-based, one-compartment model of CA1 pyramidal neurons. In this neuron model, reduced [Ca2+]o is simulated by negatively shifting the activation curve of the persistent Na+ current (INaP), as indicated by recent experimental results. The neuron model accounts, with different parameter sets, for the diversity of firing patterns observed experimentally in both zero and normal [Ca2+]o. Increasing INaP in the neuron model induces bursting and increases the number of spikes within a burst, but is neither necessary nor sufficient for bursting. We show, using fast-slow analysis and bifurcation theory, that the M-type K+ current (IM) allows bursting by shifting neuronal behavior between a silent and a tonically-active state, provided the kinetics of the spike generating currents are sufficiently, though not extremely, fast. We suggest that bursting in CA1 pyramidal cells can be explained by a single compartment *square bursting* mechanism with one slow variable, the activation of IM. See paper for more and details.
2.  Coding of stimulus frequency by latency in thalamic networks (Golomb et al 2005)
The paper presents models of the rat vibrissa processing system including the posterior medial (POm) thalamus, ventroposterior medial (VPm) thalamus, and GABAB- mediated feedback inhibition from the reticular thalamic (Rt) nucleus. A clear match between the experimentally measured spike-rates and the numerically calculated rates for the full model occurs when VPm thalamus receives stronger brainstem input and weaker GABAB-mediated inhibition than POm thalamus.
3.  Control of vibrissa motoneuron firing (Harish and Golomb 2010)
We construct and analyze a single-compartment, conductance-based model of vibrissa motoneurons. Low firing rates are supported in extended regimes by adaptation currents and the minimal firing rate decreases with the persistent sodium conductance gNaP and increases with M-potassium and h-cation conductances. Suprathreshold resonance results from the locking properties of vMN firing to stimuli and from reduction of firing rates at low frequencies by slow M and afterhyperpolarization potassium conductances. h conductance only slightly affects the suprathreshold resonance. When a vMN is subjected to a small periodic CPG input, serotonergically induced gNaP elevation may transfer the system from quiescence to a firing state that is highly locked to the CPG input.
4.  L4 cortical barrel NN model receiving thalamic input during whisking or touch (Gutnisky et al. 2017)
Excitatory neurons in layer 4 (L4) in the barrel cortex respond relatively strongly to touch but not to whisker movement (Yu et al., Nat. Neurosci. 2016). The model explains the mechanism underlying this effect. The network is settled to filter out most stationary inputs. Brief touch input passes through because it takes time until feed-forward inhibition silences excitatory neurons receiving brief and strong thalamic excitation.
5.  Persistent synchronized bursting activity in cortical tissues (Golomb et al 2005)
The program simulates a one-dimensional model of a cortical tissue with excitatory and inhibitory populations.
6.  Rate model of a cortical RS-FS-LTS network (Hayut et al. 2011)
A rate model of cortical networks composed of RS, FS and LTS neurons. Synaptic depression is modelled according to the Tsodyks-Markram scheme.
7.  Tapered whiskers are required for active tactile sensation (Hires et al. 2013)
" ... The diverse shapes of facial whiskers reflect distinct ecological niches. Rodent whiskers are conical, often with a remarkably linear taper. Here we use theoretical and experimental methods to analyze interactions of mouse whiskers with objects. ... " This is a quasi-static solution of the bending of an isolated whisker. For Fig. 2, stable solution, use: theta=-0.174533 rad. Use "Bndryval -> Show" in XPPAUT.
8.  Temporal and spatial characteristics of vibrissa responses to motor commands (Simony et al. 2010)
"A mechanistic description of the generation of whisker movements is essential for understanding the control of whisking and vibrissal active touch. We explore how facial-motoneuron spikes are translated, via an intrinsic muscle, to whisker movements. This is achieved by constructing, simulating, and analyzing a computational, biomechanical model of the motor plant, and by measuring spiking to movement transformations at small and large angles using high-precision whisker tracking in vivo. ... The model provides a direct translation from motoneuron spikes to whisker movements and can serve as a building block in closed-loop motor–sensory models of active touch."

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