Models that contain the Modeling Application : QBasic/QuickBasic/Turbo Basic (Home Page)

(QBasic: Microsoft's popular (and free!) implementation of the BASIC (Beginner's All Purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) programming language. Basic was originally developed at Dartmouth (1963-1964).)
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    Models   Description
1. Hysteresis in voltage gating of HCN channels (Elinder et al 2006, Mannikko et al 2005)
We found that HCN2 and HCN4 channels expressed in oocytes from the frog Xenopus laevis do not display the activation kinetic changes that we (previously) observed in spHCN and HCN1. However, HCN2 and HCN4 channels display changes in their tail currents, suggesting that these channels also undergo mode shifts and that the conformational changes underlying the mode shifts are due to conserved aspects of HCN channels. With computer modelling, we show that in channels with relatively slow opening kinetics and fast mode-shift transitions, such as HCN2 and HCN4 channels, the mode shift effects are not readily observable, except in the tail kinetics. Computer simulations of sino-atrial node action potentials suggest that the HCN2 channel, together with the HCN1 channel, are important regulators of the heart firing frequency and that the mode shift is an important property to prevent arrhythmic firing. We conclude that although all HCN channels appear to undergo mode shifts – and thus may serve to prevent arrhythmic firing – it is mainly observable in ionic currents from HCN channels with faster kinetics. See papers for more and details.
2. Stochastic LTP/LTD conditioning of a synapse (Migliore and Lansky 1999)
Protracted presynaptic activity can induce long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD) of the synaptic strength. However, virtually all the experiments testing how LTP and LTD depend on the conditioning input are carried out with trains of stimuli at constant frequencies, whereas neurons in vivo most likely experience a stochastic variation of interstimulus intervals. We used a computational model of synaptic transmission to test if and to what extent the stochastic fluctuations of an input signal could alter the probability to change the state of a synapse. See paper for conclusions.

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