Models that contain the Gene Name : Nav1.6 SCN8A

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    Models   Description
1.  A detailed Purkinje cell model (Masoli et al 2015)
The Purkinje cell is one of the most complex type of neuron in the central nervous system and is well known for its massive dendritic tree. The initiation of the action potential was theorized to be due to the high calcium channels presence in the dendritic tree but, in the last years, this idea was revised. In fact, the Axon Initial Segment, the first section of the axon was seen to be critical for the spontaneous generation of action potentials. The model reproduces the behaviours linked to the presence of this fundamental sections and the interplay with the other parts of the neuron.
2.  A single kinetic model for all human voltage-gated sodium channels (Balbi et al, 2017)
Code for simulating macroscopic currents of sodium channels (Nav1.1. to Nav1.9), by means of a single kinetic model. Intensity-voltage curves, normalized conductance-voltage relationship, steady-state availability and recovery from inactivation are simulated.
3.  Action Potential initiation and backpropagation in Neocortical L5 Pyramidal Neuron (Hu et al. 2009)
"...Previous computational studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the role of Na+ channel density and biophysical properties in action potential initiation as a result of inconsistent estimates of channel density. Our modeling studies integrated the immunostaining and electrophysiological results and showed that the lowest threshold for action potential initiation at the distal AIS was largely determined by the density of low-threshold Nav1.6 channels ... Distinct from the function of Nav1.6 channel, the Nav1.2 channel may control action potential backpropagation because of its high density at the proximal AIS and high threshold. ... In conclusion, distal AIS accumulation of Nav1.6 channels determines the low threshold for action potential initiation; whereas proximal AIS accumulation of Nav1.2 channels sets the threshold for the generation of somatodendritic potentials and ensures action potential backpropagation to the soma and dendrites. Thus, Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 channels serve distinct functions in action potential initiation and backpropagation."
4.  Axonal NaV1.6 Sodium Channels in AP Initiation of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons (Royeck et al. 2008)
"... We show that the Na+ channel NaV1.6 displays a striking aggregation at the AIS of cortical neurons. ... In combination with simulations using a realistic computer model of a CA1 pyramidal cell, our results imply that a hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of activation of AIS NaV1.6 channels is important both in determining spike threshold and localizing spike initiation to the AIS. ... These results suggest that NaV1.6 subunits at the AIS contribute significantly to its role as spike trigger zone and shape repetitive discharge properties of CA1 neurons."
5.  Calculating the consequences of left-shifted Nav channel activity in sick cells (Joos et al 2018)
"Two features common to diverse sick excitable cells are “leaky” Nav channels and bleb damage-damaged membranes. The bleb damage, we have argued, causes a channel kinetics based “leakiness.” Recombinant (node of Ranvier type) Nav1.6 channels voltage-clamped in mechanically-blebbed cell-attached patches undergo a damage intensity dependent kinetic change. Specifically, they experience a coupled hyperpolarizing (left) shift of the activation and inactivation processes. The biophysical observations on Nav1.6 currents formed the basis of Nav-Coupled Left Shift (Nav-CLS) theory. Node of Ranvier excitability can be modeled with Nav-CLS imposed at varying LS intensities and with varying fractions of total nodal membrane affected. Mild damage from which sick excitable cells might recover is of most interest pathologically. Accordingly, Na+/K+ ATPase (pump) activity was included in the modeling. As we described more fully in our other recent reviews, Nav-CLS in nodes with pumps proves sufficient to predict many of the pathological excitability phenomena reported for sick excitable cells. ..."
6.  Cerebellar Purkinje Cell: resurgent Na current and high frequency firing (Khaliq et al 2003)
These mod files supplied by Dr Raman are for the below two references. ... we modeled action potential firing by simulating eight currents directly recorded from Purkinje cells in both wild-type and (mutant) med mice. Regular, high-frequency firing was slowed in med Purkinje neurons. In addition to disrupted sodium currents, med neurons had small but significant changes in potassium and leak currents. Simulations indicated that these modified non-sodium currents could not account for the reduced excitability of med cells but instead slightly facilitated spiking. The loss of NaV1.6-specific kinetics, however, slowed simulated spontaneous activity. Together, the data suggest that across a range of conditions, sodium currents with a resurgent component promote and accelerate firing. See papers for more and details.
7.  DRG neuron models investigate how ion channel levels regulate firing properties (Zheng et al 2019)
We present computational models for an Abeta-LTMR (low-threshold mechanoreceptor) and a C-LTMR expressing four Na channels and four K channels to investigate how the expression level of Kv1 and Kv4 regulate number of spikes (repetitive firing) and onset latency to action potentials in Abeta-LTMRs and C-LTMRs, respectively.
8.  GC model (Beining et al 2017)
A companion modeldb entry (NEURON only) to modeldb accession number 231862.
9.  Mature and young adult-born dentate granule cell models (T2N interface) (Beining et al. 2017)
... Here, we present T2N, a powerful interface to control NEURON with Matlab and TREES toolbox, which supports generating models stable over a broad range of reconstructed and synthetic morphologies. We illustrate this for a novel, highly-detailed active model of dentate granule cells (GCs) replicating a wide palette of experiments from various labs. By implementing known differences in ion channel composition and morphology, our model reproduces data from mouse or rat, mature or adult-born GCs as well as pharmacological interventions and epileptic conditions. ... T2N is suitable for creating robust models useful for large-scale networks that could lead to novel predictions. ..." See modeldb accession number 231818 for NEURON only code.
10.  Models of Na channels from a paper on the PKC control of I Na,P (Baker 2005)
"The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) persistent Na(+) current, attributed to Na(V)1.9, was recorded in small (< 25 mum apparent diameter) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones cultured from P21 rats and from adult wild-type and Na(V)1.8 null mice. ... Numerical simulation of the up-regulation qualitatively reproduced changes in sensory neurone firing properties. ..." Note: models of NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 and also persistent and transient Na channels that collectively model Nav 1.1, 1.6, and 1.7 are present in this model.
11.  Nav1.6 sodium channel model in globus pallidus neurons (Mercer et al. 2007)
Model files for the paper Mercer JN, Chan CS, Tkatch T, Held J, Surmeier DJ. Nav1.6 sodium channels are critical to pacemaking and fast spiking in globus pallidus neurons.,J Neurosci. 2007 Dec 5;27(49):13552-66.
12.  Nodes of Ranvier with left-shifted Nav channels (Boucher et al. 2012)
The two programs CLSRanvier.f and propagation.f simulate the excitability of a myelinated axon with injured nodes of Ranvier. The injury is simulated as the Coupled Left Shift (CLS) of the activation(V) and inactivation(V) (availability) of a fraction of Nav channels.
13.  TTX-R Na+ current effect on cell response (Herzog et al 2001)
"Small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, which include nociceptors, express multiple voltage-gated sodium currents. In addition to a classical fast inactivating tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) sodium current, many of these cells express a TTX-resistant (TTX-R) sodium current that activates near -70 mV and is persistent at negative potentials. To investigate the possible contributions of this TTX-R persistent (TTX-RP) current to neuronal excitability, we carried out computer simulations using the Neuron program with TTX-S and -RP currents, fit by the Hodgkin-Huxley model, that closely matched the currents recorded from small DRG neurons. ..." See paper for more and details.

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