Models that contain the Model Concept : Place cell/field

(Pyramidal cells found in the hippocampus and then later in the entorhinal cortex that fire when an animal is in particular location. Place fields refer to the regions these cells fire in, usually preferentially in a velocity direction dependent manner.)
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    Models   Description
1.  Behavioral time scale synaptic plasticity underlies CA1 place fields (Bittner et al. 2017)
" ... Place fields could be produced in vivo in a single trial by potentiation of input that arrived seconds before and after complex spiking.The potentiated synaptic input was not initially coincident with action potentials or depolarization.This rule, named behavioral timescale synaptic plasticity, abruptly modifies inputs that were neither causal nor close in time to postsynaptic activation. ...", " ... To determine if the above plasticity rule could be observed under more realistic model conditions, we constructed and optimized a biophysically detailed model and attempted to fully account for the experimental data. ... "
2.  Biologically-plausible models for spatial navigation (Cannon et al 2003)
Hypotheses about how parahippocampal and hippocampal structures may be involved in spatial navigation tasks are implemented in a model of a virtual rat navigating through a virtual environment in search of a food reward. The model incorporates theta oscillations to separate encoding from retrieval and yields testable predictions about the phase relations of spiking activity to theta oscillations in different parts of the hippocampal formation at various stages of the behavioral task. See paper for more and details.
3.  CA1 network model for place cell dynamics (Turi et al 2019)
Biophysical model of CA1 hippocampal region. The model simulates place cells/fields and explores the place cell dynamics as function of VIP+ interneurons.
4.  CA1 pyr cell: Inhibitory modulation of spatial selectivity+phase precession (Grienberger et al 2017)
Spatially uniform synaptic inhibition enhances spatial selectivity and temporal coding in CA1 place cells by suppressing broad out-of-field excitation.
5.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: Persistent Na current mediates steep synaptic amplification (Hsu et al 2018)
This paper shows that persistent sodium current critically contributes to the subthreshold nonlinear dynamics of CA1 pyramidal neurons and promotes rapidly reversible conversion between place-cell and silent-cell in the hippocampus. A simple model built with realistic axo-somatic voltage-gated sodium channels in CA1 (Carter et al., 2012; Neuron 75, 1081–1093) demonstrates that the biophysics of persistent sodium current is sufficient to explain the synaptic amplification effects. A full model built previously (Grienberger et al., 2017; Nature Neuroscience, 20(3): 417–426) with detailed morphology, ion channel types and biophysical properties of CA1 place cells naturally reproduces the steep voltage dependence of synaptic responses.
6.  Grid cells from place cells (Castro & Aguiar, 2014)
" ...Here we present a novel model for the emergence of gridlike firing patterns that stands on two key hypotheses: (1) spatial information in GCs is provided from PC activity and (2) grid fields result from a combined synaptic plasticity mechanism involving inhibitory and excitatory neurons mediating the connections between PCs and GCs. ..."
7.  MEC layer II stellate cell: Synaptic mechanisms of grid cells (Schmidt-Hieber & Hausser 2013)
This study investigates the cellular mechanisms of grid field generation in Medial Entorhinal Cortex (MEC) layer II stellate cells.
8.  Modular grid cell responses as a basis for hippocampal remapping (Monaco and Abbott 2011)
"Hippocampal place fields, the local regions of activity recorded from place cells in exploring rodents, can undergo large changes in relative location during remapping. This process would appear to require some form of modulated global input. Grid-cell responses recorded from layer II of medial entorhinal cortex in rats have been observed to realign concurrently with hippocampal remapping, making them a candidate input source. However, this realignment occurs coherently across colocalized ensembles of grid cells (Fyhn et al., 2007). The hypothesized entorhinal contribution to remapping depends on whether this coherence extends to all grid cells, which is currently unknown. We study whether dividing grid cells into small numbers of independently realigning modules can both account for this localized coherence and allow for hippocampal remapping. ..."
9.  Noise promotes independent control of gamma oscillations and grid firing (Solanka et al 2015)
"Neural computations underlying cognitive functions require calibration of the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic connections and are associated with modulation of gamma frequency oscillations in network activity. However, principles relating gamma oscillations, synaptic strength and circuit computations are unclear. We address this in attractor network models that account for grid firing and theta-nested gamma oscillations in the medial entorhinal cortex. ..."
10.  Odor supported place cell model and goal navigation in rodents (Kulvicius et al. 2008)
" ... Here we model odor supported place cells by using a simple feed-forward network and analyze the impact of olfactory cues on place cell formation and spatial navigation. The obtained place cells are used to solve a goal navigation task by a novel mechanism based on self-marking by odor patches combined with a Q-learning algorithm. We also analyze the impact of place cell remapping on goal directed behavior when switching between two environments. ..."
11.  Phase precession through acceleration of local theta rhythm (Castro & Aguiar 2011)
"... Here we present a biophysical spiking model for phase precession in hippocampal CA1 which focuses on the interaction between place cells and local inhibitory interneurons. The model’s functional block is composed of a place cell (PC) connected with a local inhibitory cell (IC) which is modulated by the population theta rhythm. Both cells receive excitatory inputs from the entorhinal cortex (EC). ..."
12.  Place and grid cells in a loop (Rennó-Costa & Tort 2017)
This model implements a loop circuit between place and grid cells. The model was used to explain place cell remapping and grid cell realignment. Grid cell model as a continuous attractor network. Place cells have recurrent attractor network. Rate models implemented with E%-MAX winner-take-all network dynamics, with gamma cycle time-step.
13.  Sensory feedback in an oscillatory interference model of place cell activity (Monaco et al. 2011)
Many animals use a form of dead reckoning known as 'path integration' to maintain a sense of their location as they explore the world. However, internal motion signals and the neural activity that integrates them can be noisy, leading inevitably to inaccurate position estimates. The rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex support a flexible system of spatial representation that is critical to spatial learning and memory. The position signal encoded by this system is thought to rely on path integration, but it must be recalibrated by familiar landmarks to maintain accuracy. To explore the interaction between path integration and external landmarks, we present a model of hippocampal activity based on the interference of theta-frequency oscillations that are modulated by realistic animal movements around a track. We show that spatial activity degrades with noise, but introducing external cues based on direct sensory feedback can prevent this degradation. When these cues are put into conflict with each other, their interaction produces a diverse array of response changes that resembles experimental observations. Feedback driven by attending to landmarks may be critical to navigation and spatial memory in mammals.
14.  Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
15.  Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
16.  Synthesis of spatial tuning functions from theta cell spike trains (Welday et al., 2011)
A single compartment model reproduces the firing rate maps of place, grid, and boundary cells by receiving inhibitory inputs from theta cells. The theta cell spike trains are modulated by the rat's movement velocity in such a way that phase interference among their burst pattern creates spatial envelope function which simulate the firing rate maps.
17.  Theta phase precession in a model CA3 place cell (Baker and Olds 2007)
"... The present study concerns a neurobiologically based computational model of the emergence of theta phase precession in which the responses of a single model CA3 pyramidal cell are examined in the context of stimulation by realistic afferent spike trains including those of place cells in entorhinal cortex, dentate gyrus, and other CA3 pyramidal cells. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the model CA3 pyramidal cell leads to a spatially correlated associational synaptic drive that subsequently creates a spatially asymmetric expansion of the model cell’s place field. ... Through selective manipulations of the model it is possible to decompose theta phase precession in CA3 into the separate contributing factors of inheritance from upstream afferents in the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex, the interaction of synaptically controlled increasing afferent drive with phasic inhibition, and the theta phase difference between dentate gyrus granule cell and CA3 pyramidal cell activity."

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