Models that contain the Model Concept : Conduction failure

(The inability of a neuron to propagate an action potential throughout it's plasma membrane, especially the distal part of the axon.)
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    Models   Description
1.  A model of the T-junction of a C-fiber sensory neuron (Sundt et al. 2015)
The effect of geometry and ionic mechanisms on spike propagation through the T-junction of an unmyelinated sensory neuron.
2.  CA1 pyramidal cell: reconstructed axonal arbor and failures at weak gap junctions (Vladimirov 2011)
Model of pyramidal CA1 cells connected by gap junctions in their axons. Cell geometry is based on anatomical reconstruction of rat CA1 cell (NeuroMorpho.Org ID: NMO_00927) with long axonal arbor. Model init_2cells.hoc shows failures of second spike propagation in a spike doublet, depending on conductance of an axonal gap junction. Model init_ring.hoc shows that spike failure result in reentrant oscillations of a spike in a loop of axons connected by gap junctions, where one gap junction is weak. The paper shows that in random networks of axons connected by gap junctions, oscillations are driven by single pacemaker loop of axons. The shortest loop, around which a spike can travel, is the most likely pacemaker. This principle allows us to predict the frequency of oscillations from network connectivity and visa versa. We propose that this type of oscillations corresponds to so-called fast ripples in epileptic hippocampus.
3.  Functional impact of dendritic branch point morphology (Ferrante et al., 2013)
" ... Here, we first quantified the morphological variability of branch points from two-photon images of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We then investigated the geometrical features affecting spike initiation, propagation, and timing with a computational model validated by glutamate uncaging experiments. The results suggest that even subtle membrane readjustments at branch point could drastically alter the ability of synaptic input to generate, propagate, and time action potentials."
4.  High frequency oscillations induced in three gap-junction coupled neurons (Tseng et al. 2008)
Here we showed experimentally that high frequency oscillations (up to 600 Hz) were easily induced in a purely gap-junction coupled network by simple two stimuli with very short interval. The root cause is that the second elicited spike suffered from slow propagation speed and failure to transmit through a low-conductance junction. Similiar results were also obtained in these simulation.
5.  Mechanisms of very fast oscillations in axon networks coupled by gap junctions (Munro, Borgers 2010)
Axons connected by gap junctions can produce very fast oscillations (VFOs, > 80 Hz) when stimulated randomly at a low rate. The models here explore the mechanisms of VFOs that can be seen in an axonal plexus, (Munro & Borgers, 2009): a large network model of an axonal plexus, small network models of axons connected by gap junctions, and an implementation of the model underlying figure 12 in Traub et al. (1999) . The large network model consists of 3,072 5-compartment axons connected in a random network. The 5-compartment axons are the 5 axonal compartments from the CA3 pyramidal cell model in Traub et al. (1994) with a fixed somatic voltage. The random network has the same parameters as the random network in Traub et al. (1999), and axons are stimulated randomly via a Poisson process with a rate of 2/s/axon. The small network models simulate waves propagating through small networks of axons connected by gap junctions to study how local connectivity affects the refractory period.
6.  Nodes of Ranvier with left-shifted Nav channels (Boucher et al. 2012)
The two programs CLSRanvier.f and propagation.f simulate the excitability of a myelinated axon with injured nodes of Ranvier. The injury is simulated as the Coupled Left Shift (CLS) of the activation(V) and inactivation(V) (availability) of a fraction of Nav channels.
7.  Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
8.  Temperature-Sensitive conduction at axon branch points (Westerfield et al 1978)
Propagation of impulses through branching regions of squid axons was examined experimentally and with computer simulations. The ratio of postbranch/prebranch diameters at which propagation failed was very sensitive to temperature.
9.  Touch Sensory Cells (T Cells) of the Leech (Cataldo et al. 2004) (Scuri et al. 2007)
Bursts of spikes in leech T cells produce an AHP, which results from activation of a Na+/K+ pump and a Ca2+-dependent K+ current. Activity-dependent increases in the AHP are believed to induce conduction block of spikes in several regions of the neuron, which in turn, may decrease presynaptic invasion of spikes and thereby decrease transmitter release. To explore this possibility, we used the neurosimulator SNNAP to develop a multi-compartmental model of the T cell. Each compartment was modeled as an equivalent electrical circuit, in which some currents were regulated by intracellular Ca2+ and Na+. The membrane model consisted of a membrane capacitance (Cm), for which we used the value 1 uF/cm2, in parallel with two inward currents (Na+ and Ca2+), two K+ currents, a leak current and pump current. The model incorporated empirical data that describe the geometry of the cell and activity-dependent changes of the AHP (see paper for details). Simulations indicated that at some branching points, activity-dependent increases of the AHP reduced the number of spikes transmitted from the minor receptive field to the soma and beyond. These results suggest that the AHP can regulate spike conduction within the presynaptic arborizations of the cell and could in principle contribute to the synaptic depression that is correlated with increases in the AHP.

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