Models that contain the Model Concept : Spike Frequency Adaptation

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    Models   Description
1.  CA3 pyramidal neuron (Safiulina et al. 2010)
In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. To compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in postnatal development, a realistic model was constructed taking into account the different biophysical properties of these synapses.
2.  Cell signaling/ion channel variability effects on neuronal response (Anderson, Makadia, et al. 2015)
" ... We evaluated the impact of molecular variability in the expression of cell signaling components and ion channels on electrophysiological excitability and neuromodulation. We employed a computational approach that integrated neuropeptide receptor-mediated signaling with electrophysiology. We simulated a population of neurons in which expression levels of a neuropeptide receptor and multiple ion channels were simultaneously varied within a physiological range. We analyzed the effects of variation on the electrophysiological response to a neuropeptide stimulus. ..."
3.  Complex dynamics: reproducing Golgi cell electroresponsiveness (Geminiani et al 2018, 2019ab)
Excerpts from three papers abstracts: "Brain neurons exhibit complex electroresponsive properties – including intrinsic subthreshold oscillations and pacemaking, resonance and phase-reset – which are thought to play a critical role in controlling neural network dynamics. Although these properties emerge from detailed representations of molecular-level mechanisms in “realistic” models, they cannot usually be generated by simplified neuronal models (although these may show spike-frequency adaptation and bursting). We report here that this whole set of properties can be generated by the extended generalized leaky integrate-and-fire (E-GLIF) neuron model. ..." "... In order to reproduce these properties in single-point neuron models, we have optimized the Extended-Generalized Leaky Integrate and Fire (E-GLIF) neuron through a multi-objective gradient-based algorithm targeting the desired input–output relationships. ..." " ... In order to investigate how single neuron dynamics and geometrical modular connectivity affect cerebellar processing, we have built an olivocerebellar Spiking Neural Network (SNN) based on a novel simplification algorithm for single point models (Extended Generalized Leaky Integrate and Fire, EGLIF) capturing essential non-linear neuronal dynamics (e.g., pacemaking, bursting, adaptation, oscillation and resonance). ..."
4.  Computational neuropharmacology of CA1 pyramidal neuron (Ferrante et al. 2008)
In this paper, the model was used to show how neuroactive drugs targeting different neuronal mechanisms affect the signal integration in CA1 pyramidal neuron. Ferrante M, Blackwell KT, Migliore M, Ascoli GA (2008)
5.  Dentate granule cell: mAHP & sAHP; SK & Kv7/M channels (Mateos-Aparicio et al., 2014)
The model is based on that of Aradi & Holmes (1999; Journal of Computational Neuroscience 6, 215-235). It was used to help understand the contribution of M and SK channels to the medium afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) following one or seven spikes, as well as the contribution of M channels to the slow afterhyperpolarization (sAHP). We found that SK channels are the main determinants of the mAHP, in contrast to CA1 pyramidal cells where the mAHP is primarily caused by the opening of M channels. The model reproduced these experimental results, but we were unable to reproduce the effects of the M-channel blocker XE991 on the sAHP. It is suggested that either the XE991-sensitive component of the sAHP is not due to M channels, or that when contributing to the sAHP, these channels operate in a mode different from that associated with the mAHP.
6.  Diameter, Myelination and Na/K pump interactions affect axonal resilience to high frequency spiking
7.  Discharge hysteresis in motoneurons (Powers & Heckman 2015)
"Motoneuron activity is strongly influenced by the activation of persistent inward currents (PICs) mediated by voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. ... It has recently been suggested that a number of factors other than PIC can contribute to delta F (firing rate differences between motoneurons) values, including mechanisms underlying spike frequency adaptation and spike threshold accommodation. In the present study, we used a set of compartmental models representing a sample of 20 motoneurons with a range of thresholds to investigate how several different intrinsic motoneuron properties can potentially contribute to variations in F values. ... Our results indicate that, although other factors can contribute, variations in discharge hysteresis and delta F values primarily reflect the contribution of dendritic PICs to motoneuron activation.
8.  Dopamine neuron of the vent. periaqu. gray and dors. raphe nucleus (vlPAG/DRN) (Dougalis et al 2017)
The following computer model describes the electrophysiological properties of dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventrolateral periaquaductal gray and dorsal raphe nucleus (vlPAG/DRN). the model and how to replicate Figures 7-10 of the manuscript (Dougalis et al., 2017 J Comput Neurosci). SUMMARY: We have conducted a voltage-clamp study to provide a kinetic description of major sodium, potassium and calcium ionic currents operant on adult DA vlPAG/DRN neurons in brain slices obtained from pitx3-GFP mice. Based on experimentally derived voltage-clamp data, we then constructed a simplified, conductance-based, Hodgkin and Huxley-type, computer model and validated its behaviour against in vitro neurophysiological data. Using simulations in the computational DA model, we explored the contribution of individual ionic currents in vlPAG/DRN DA neuron’s spontaneous firing, pacemaker frequency and threshold for spike frequency adaptation in silico. The data presented here extend our previous physiological characterization (Dougalis et al. 2012) and argue that DA neurons of the vlPAG/DRN express autorhythmicity in the absence of synaptic transmission via the interplay of potassium and sodium currents without the absolute need of calcium currents. The properties of the ionic currents recorded here (IH current, IA current), the lack of small oscillating potentials in the presence of sodium channel blockers taken together with the mechanisms for autorhythmicity (reliance more on sodium rather than calcium currents) also support further the idea that vlPAG/DRN DA neurons are operationally similar to VTA, rather than SNc, DA neurons. In particular, the properties of a slowly inactivating IA current in conjunction with the small and slowly activating IH current described herein pinpoint that vlPAG/DRN DA neurons are most similar to prefrontal cortex or medial shell of nucleus accumbens projecting DA neurons (see Lammel et al. 2008, 2011).
9.  Effects of the membrane AHP on the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO) (Zhou & Colburn 2010)
This simulation study investigated how membrane afterhyperpolarization (AHP) influences spiking activity of neurons in the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO). The model incorporates a general integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with a first-order adaptation channel. Simulations focus on differentiating the effects of GAHP, tauAHP, and input strength on (1) spike interval statistics, such as negative serial correlation and chopper onset, and (2) neural sensitivity to interaural level difference (ILD) of LSO neurons. The model simulated electrophysiological data collected in cat LSO (Tsuchitani and Johnson, 1985).
10.  Evolving simple models of diverse dynamics in hippocampal neuron types (Venkadesh et al 2018)
" ... we present an automated pipeline based on evolutionary algorithms to quantitatively reproduce features of various classes of neuronal spike patterns using the Izhikevich model. Employing experimental data from Hippocampome.org, a comprehensive knowledgebase of neuron types in the rodent hippocampus, we demonstrate that our approach reliably fit Izhikevich models to nine distinct classes of experimentally recorded spike patterns, including delayed spiking, spiking with adaptation, stuttering, and bursting. ..."
11.  Fractional leaky integrate-and-fire model (Teka et al. 2014)
We developed the Fractional Leaky Integrate-and-Fire model that can produce downward and upward spike time adaptions observed on pyramidal cells.The adaptation emerges from the fractional exponent of the voltage dynamics.
12.  Gating of steering signals through phasic modulation of reticulospinal neurons (Kozlov et al. 2014)
" ... We use the lamprey as a model for investigating the role of this phasic modulation of the reticulospinal activity, because the brainstem–spinal cord networks are known down to the cellular level in this phylogenetically oldest extant vertebrate. We describe how the phasic modulation of reticulospinal activity from the spinal CPG ensures reliable steering/turning commands without the need for a very precise timing of on- or offset, by using a biophysically detailed large-scale (19,600 model neurons and 646,800 synapses) computational model of the lamprey brainstem–spinal cord network. To verify that the simulated neural network can control body movements, including turning, the spinal activity is fed to a mechanical model of lamprey swimming. ..."
13.  Grid cell oscillatory interference with noisy network oscillators (Zilli and Hasselmo 2010)
To examine whether an oscillatory interference model of grid cell activity could work if the oscillators were noisy neurons, we implemented these simulations. Here the oscillators are networks (either synaptically- or gap-junction--coupled) of one or more noisy neurons (either Izhikevich's simple model or a Hodgkin-Huxley--type biophysical model) which drive a postsynaptic cell (which may be integrate-and-fire, resonate-and-fire, or the simple model) which should fire spatially as a grid cell if the simulation is successful.
14.  HERG K+ channels spike-frequency adaptation (Chiesa et al 1997)
Spike frequency adaptation has contributions from the IHERG current (encoded by the human eag-related gene (HERG); Warmke & Ganetzky, 1994), which develops with slow kinetics during depolarization and contributes to the repolarization of the long action potentials typically present in the heart. IHERG is one of the delayed rectifier currents (IK(r)) of the heart, and HERG mutations are associated with one of the cardiac arrhythmia LQT syndromes (LQT2). See paper for more and details.
15.  High entrainment constrains synaptic depression in a globular bushy cell (Rudnicki & Hemmert 2017)
" ... Here we show how different levels of synaptic depression shape firing properties of GBCs in in vivo-like conditions using computer simulations. We analyzed how an interplay of synaptic depression (0 % to 70 %) and the number of auditory nerve fiber inputs (10 to 70) contributes to the variability of the experimental data from previous studies. ... Overall, this study helps to understand how synaptic properties shape temporal processing in the auditory system. It also integrates, compares, and reconciles results of various experimental studies."
16.  Hodgkin–Huxley model with fractional gating (Teka et al. 2016)
We use fractional order derivatives to model the kinetic dynamics of the gate variables for the potassium and sodium conductances of the Hodgkin-Huxley model. Our results show that power-law dynamics of the different gate variables result in a wide range of action potential shapes and spiking patterns, even in the case where the model was stimulated with constant current. As a consequence, power-law behaving conductances result in an increase in the number of spiking patterns a neuron can generate and, we propose, expand the computational capacity of the neuron.
17.  Input Fluctuations effects on f-I curves (Arsiero et al. 2007)
"... We examined in vitro frequency versus current (f-I) relationships of layer 5 (L5) pyramidal cells of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) using fluctuating stimuli. ...our results show that mPFC L5 pyramidal neurons retain an increased sensitivity to input fluctuations, whereas their sensitivity to the input mean diminishes to near zero. This implies that the discharge properties of L5 mPFC neurons are well suited to encode input fluctuations rather than input mean in their firing rates, with important consequences for information processing and stability of persistent activity at the network level."
18.  Leaky integrate-and-fire model of spike frequency adaptation in the LGMD (Gabbiani and Krapp 2006)
This will reproduce Figure 9 of Gabbiani and Krapp (2006) J Neurophysiol 96:2951-2962. The figure simply shows that a leaky-integrate-and-fire model cannot reproduce spike frequency adaptation as it is seen experimentally in the LGMD neuron.
19.  Models for cortical UP-DOWN states in a bistable inhibitory-stabilized network (Jercog et al 2017)
In the idling brain, neuronal circuits transition between periods of sustained firing (UP state) and quiescence (DOWN state), a pattern the mechanisms of which remain unclear. We analyzed spontaneous cortical population activity from anesthetized rats and found that UP and DOWN durations were highly variable and that population rates showed no significant decay during UP periods. We built a network rate model with excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) populations exhibiting a novel bistable regime between a quiescent and an inhibition-stabilized state of arbitrarily low rate, where fluctuations triggered state transitions. In addition, we implemented these mechanisms in a more biophysically realistic spiking network, where DOWN-to-UP transitions are caused by synchronous high-amplitude events impinging onto the network.
20.  Network bursts in cultured NN result from different adaptive mechanisms (Masquelier & Deco 2013)
It is now well established that cultured neuron networks are spontaneously active, and tend to synchronize. Synchronous events typically involve the whole network, and have thus been termed “network spikes” (NS). Using experimental recordings and numerical simulations, we show here that the inter-NS interval statistics are complex, and allow inferring the neural mechanisms at work, in particular the adaptive ones, and estimating a number of parameters to which we cannot access experimentally.
21.  Rat phrenic motor neuron (Amini et al 2004)
We have developed a model for the rat phrenic motor neuron (PMN) that robustly replicates many experimentally observed behaviors of PMNs in response to pharmacological, ionic, and electrical perturbations using a single set of parameters.
22.  Spike frequency adaptation in spinal sensory neurones (Melnick et al 2004)
Using tight-seal recordings from rat spinal cord slices, intracellular labelling and computer simulation, we analysed the mechanisms of spike frequency adaptation in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurones. Adapting-firing neurones (AFNs) generated short bursts of spikes during sustained depolarization and were mostly found in lateral SG. ... Ca2 + -dependent conductances do not contribute to adapting firing. Transient KA current was small and completely inactivated at resting potential suggesting that adapting firing was mainly generated by voltage-gated Na+ and delayed-rectifier K+ (KDR ) currents. ... Computer simulation has further revealed that down-regulation of Na+ conductance represents an effective mechanism for the induction of firing adaptation. It is suggested that the cell-specific regulation of Na+ channel expression can be an important factor underlying the diversity of firing patterns in SG neurones. See paper for more and details.
23.  Spike frequency adaptation in the LGMD (Peron and Gabbiani 2009)
This model is used in the referenced paper to demonstrate that a model of an SK-like calcium-sensitive potassium (KCa) conductance can replicate the spike frequency adaptation (SFA) of the locust lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) neuron. The model simulates current injection experiments with and without KCa block in the LGMD, as well as visual stimulation experiments with and without KCa block.
24.  Zebrafish Mauthner-cell model (Watanabe et al 2017)
The NEURON model files encode the channel generator and firing simulator for simulating development and differentiation of the Mauthner cell (M-cell) excitability in zebrafish. The channel generator enables us to generate arbitrary Na+ and K+ channels by changing parameters of a Hodgkin-Huxley model under emulation of two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocyte system. The firing simulator simulates current-clamp recordings to generate firing patterns of the model M-cell, which are implemented with arbitrary-generated basic Na+ and K+ conductances and low-threshold K+ channels Kv7.4/KCNQ4 and sole Kv1.1 or Kv1.1 coexpressed with Kvbeta2.

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