Models that contain the Region : Striatum

Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  A computational model of action selection in the basal ganglia (Suryanarayana et al 2019)
" ... Here, we incorporate newly revealed subgroups of neurons within the GPe into an existing computational model of the basal ganglia, and investigate their role in action selection. Three main results ensued. First, using previously used metrics for selection, the new extended connectivity improved the action selection performance of the model. Second, low frequency theta oscillations were observed in the subpopulation of the GPe (the TA or ‘arkypallidal’ neurons) which project exclusively to the striatum. These oscillations were suppressed by increased dopamine activity — revealing a possible link with symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Third, a new phenomenon was observed in which the usual monotonic relationship between input to the basal ganglia and its output within an action ‘channel’ was, under some circumstances, reversed. ..."
2.  Calcium influx during striatal upstates (Evans et al. 2013)
"... To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the relationship between calcium and AP timing, we have developed a realistic biophysical model of a medium spiny neuron (MSN). ... Using this model, we found that either the slow inactivation of dendritic sodium channels (NaSI) or the calcium inactivation of voltage-gated calcium channels (CDI) can cause high calcium corresponding to early APs and lower calcium corresponding to later APs. We found that only CDI can account for the experimental observation that sensitivity to AP timing is dependent on NMDA receptors. Additional simulations demonstrated a mechanism by which MSNs can dynamically modulate their sensitivity to AP timing and show that sensitivity to specifically timed pre- and postsynaptic pairings (as in spike timing-dependent plasticity protocols) is altered by the timing of the pairing within the upstate. …"
3.  Cognitive and motor cortico-basal ganglia interactions during decision making (Guthrie et al 2013)
This is a re-implementation of Guthrie et al 2013 by Topalidou and Rougier 2015. The original study investigated how multiple level action selection could be performed by the basal ganglia.
4.  Computational endophenotypes in addiction (Fiore et al 2018)
"... here we simulated phenotypic variations in addiction symptomology and responses to putative treatments, using both a neural model, based on cortico-striatal circuit dynamics, and an algorithmic model of reinforcement learning. These simulations rely on the widely accepted assumption that both the ventral, model-based, goal-directed system and the dorsal, model-free, habitual system are vulnerable to extra-physiologic dopamine reinforcements triggered by addictive rewards. We found that endophenotypic differences in the balance between the two circuit or control systems resulted in an inverted U-shape in optimal choice behavior. Specifically, greater unbalance led to a higher likelihood of developing addiction and more severe drug-taking behaviors. ..."
5.  Electrotonic transform and EPSCs for WT and Q175+/- spiny projection neurons (Goodliffe et al 2018)
This model achieves electrotonic transform and computes mean inward and outward attenuation from 0 to 500 Hz input; and randomly activates synapses along dendrites to simulate AMPAR mediated EPSCs. For electrotonic analysis, in Elec folder, the entry file is MSNelec_transform.hoc. For EPSC simulation, in Syn folder, the entry file is randomepsc.hoc. Run read_EPSCsims_mdb_alone.m next with the simulated parameter values specified to compute the mean EPSC.
6.  FS Striatal interneuron: K currents solve signal-to-noise problems (Kotaleski et al 2006)
... We show that a transient potassium (KA) current allows the Fast Spiking (FS) interneuron to strike a balance between sensitivity to correlated input and robustness to noise, thereby increasing its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). First, a compartmental FS neuron model was created to match experimental data from striatal FS interneurons in cortex–striatum–substantia nigra organotypic cultures. Densities of sodium, delayed rectifier, and KA channels were optimized to replicate responses to somatic current injection. Spontaneous AMPA and GABA synaptic currents were adjusted to the experimentally measured amplitude, rise time, and interevent interval histograms. Second, two additional adjustments were required to emulate the remaining experimental observations. GABA channels were localized closer to the soma than AMPA channels to match the synaptic population reversal potential. Correlation among inputs was required to produce the observed firing rate during up-states. In this final model, KA channels were essential for suppressing down-state spikes while allowing reliable spike generation during up-states. ... Our results suggest that KA channels allow FS interneurons to operate without a decrease in SNR during conditions of increased dopamine, as occurs in response to reward or anticipated reward. See paper for more and details.
7.  Learning intrinsic excitability in Medium Spiny Neurons (Scheler 2014)
"We present an unsupervised, local activation-dependent learning rule for intrinsic plasticity (IP) which affects the composition of ion channel conductances for single neurons in a use-dependent way. We use a single-compartment conductance-based model for medium spiny striatal neurons in order to show the effects of parameterization of individual ion channels on the neuronal membrane potential-curent relationship (activation function). We show that parameter changes within the physiological ranges are sufficient to create an ensemble of neurons with significantly different activation functions. ... "
8.  Logarithmic distributions prove that intrinsic learning is Hebbian (Scheler 2017)
"In this paper, we present data for the lognormal distributions of spike rates, synaptic weights and intrinsic excitability (gain) for neurons in various brain areas, such as auditory or visual cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, striatum, midbrain nuclei. We find a remarkable consistency of heavy-tailed, specifically lognormal, distributions for rates, weights and gains in all brain areas examined. The difference between strongly recurrent and feed-forward connectivity (cortex vs. striatum and cerebellum), neurotransmitter (GABA (striatum) or glutamate (cortex)) or the level of activation (low in cortex, high in Purkinje cells and midbrain nuclei) turns out to be irrelevant for this feature. Logarithmic scale distribution of weights and gains appears to be a general, functional property in all cases analyzed. We then created a generic neural model to investigate adaptive learning rules that create and maintain lognormal distributions. We conclusively demonstrate that not only weights, but also intrinsic gains, need to have strong Hebbian learning in order to produce and maintain the experimentally attested distributions. This provides a solution to the long-standing question about the type of plasticity exhibited by intrinsic excitability."
9.  Multiscale simulation of the striatal medium spiny neuron (Mattioni & Le Novere 2013)
"… We present a new event-driven algorithm to synchronize different neuronal models, which decreases computational time and avoids superfluous synchronizations. The algorithm is implemented in the TimeScales framework. We demonstrate its use by simulating a new multiscale model of the Medium Spiny Neuron of the Neostriatum. The model comprises over a thousand dendritic spines, where the electrical model interacts with the respective instances of a biochemical model. Our results show that a multiscale model is able to exhibit changes of synaptic plasticity as a result of the interaction between electrical and biochemical signaling. …"
10.  Prefrontal–striatal Parkinsons comp. model of multicue category learning (Moustafa and Gluck 2011)
"... In this model, PFC dopamine is key for attentional learning, whereas basal ganglia dopamine, consistent with other models, is key for reinforcement and motor learning. The model assumes that competitive dynamics among PFC neurons is the neural mechanism underlying stimulus selection with limited attentional resources, whereas competitive dynamics among striatal neurons is the neural mechanism underlying action selection. According to our model, PD is associated with decreased phasic and tonic dopamine levels in both PFC and basal ganglia. ..."
11.  Signaling pathways In D1R containing striatal spiny projection neurons (Blackwell et al 2018)
We implemented a mechanistic model of signaling pathways activated by dopamine D1 receptors, acetylcholine receptors, and glutamate. We use our novel, computationally efficient simulator, NeuroRD, to simulate stochastic interactions both within and between dendritic spines. Results show that the combined activity of several key plasticity molecules correctly predicts the occurrence of either LTP, LTD or no plasticity for numerous experimental protocols.
12.  Specific inhibition of dendritic plateau potential in striatal projection neurons (Du et al 2017)
We explored dendritic plateau potentials in a biophysically detailed SPN model. We coupled the dendritic plateaus to different types of inhibitions (dendritic fast and slow inhibitions, perisomatic inhibition from FS interneurons , etc.) We found the inhibition provides precise control over the plateau potential, and thus the spiking output of SPNs.
13.  Striatal D1R medium spiny neuron, including a subcellular DA cascade (Lindroos et al 2018)
We are investigating how dopaminergic modulation of single channels can be combined to make the D1R possitive MSN more excitable. We also connect multiple channels to substrates of a dopamine induced subcellular cascade to highlight that the classical pathway is too slow to explain DA induced kinetics in the subsecond range (Howe and Dombeck, 2016. doi: 10.1038/nature18942)
14.  Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.

Re-display model names without descriptions