Models that contain the Implementer : Halnes, Geir [geir.halnes at nmbu.no]

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    Models   Description
1.  A multi-compartment model for interneurons in the dLGN (Halnes et al. 2011)
This model for dLGN interneurons is presented in two parameterizations (P1 & P2), which were fitted to current-clamp data from two different interneurons (IN1 & IN2). The model qualitatively reproduces the responses in IN1 & IN2 under 8 different experimental condition, and quantitatively reproduces the I/O-relations (#spikes elicited as a function of injected current).
2.  Effect of ionic diffusion on extracellular potentials (Halnes et al 2016)
"Recorded potentials in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is a standard measure of population activity in neural tissue. Computational models that simulate the relationship between the ECS potential and its underlying neurophysiological processes are commonly used in the interpretation of such measurements. Standard methods, such as volume-conductor theory and current-source density theory, assume that diffusion has a negligible effect on the ECS potential, at least in the range of frequencies picked up by most recording systems. This assumption remains to be verified. We here present a hybrid simulation framework that accounts for diffusive effects on the ECS potential. ..."
3.  Electrodiffusive astrocytic and extracellular ion concentration dynamics model (Halnes et al. 2013)
An electrodiffusive formalism was developed for computing the dynamics of the membrane potential and ion concentrations in the intra- and extracellular space in a one-dimensional geometry (cable). This (general) formalism was implemented in a model of astrocytes exchanging K+, Na+ and Cl- ions with the extracellular space (ECS). A limited region (0< x<l/10 where l is the astrocyte length) of the ECS was exposed to an increase in the local K+ concentration. The model is used to explore how astrocytes contribute in transporting K+ out from high-concentration regions via a mechanism known as spatial buffering, which involves local uptake from high concentration regions, intracellular transport, and release of K+ in regions with lower ECS concentrations.

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