Models that contain the Model Concept : Beta oscillations

(15-30 Hz oscillations in brains. Some investigators use 15-25 Hz for beta.)
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    Models   Description
1.  Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
2.  Cortical Basal Ganglia Network Model during Closed-loop DBS (Fleming et al 2020)
We developed a computational model of the cortical basal ganglia network to investigate closed-loop control of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD). The cortical basal ganglia network model incorporates the (i) the extracellular DBS electric field, (ii) antidromic and orthodromic activation of STN afferent fibers, (iii) the LFP detected at non-stimulating contacts on the DBS electrode and (iv) temporal variation of network beta-band activity within the thalamo-cortico-basal ganglia loop. The model facilitates investigation of clinically-viable closed-loop DBS control approaches, modulating either DBS amplitude or frequency, using an LFP derived measure of network beta-activity.
3.  Excessive beta oscillations in Parkinson's disease (Pavlides et al. 2015)
" ... Understanding the generation of beta oscillations is important to improve treatments for Parkinson’s disease. Competing theories exist for how these oscillations are generated in the affected brain circuits, which include the motor cortex and a set of subcortical nuclei called the basal ganglia. This paper suggests two hypotheses for the generation of beta oscillations. The first hypothesis is that beta oscillations are generated in the motor cortex, and the basal ganglia resonate to the cortical input. The second hypothesis additionally proposes that feedback from the basal ganglia to cortex is critically important for the presence of the oscillations. We show that the models can successfully account for a wide range of experimental data concerning the presence of beta oscillations in Parkinson’s disease."
4.  Gamma-beta alternation in the olfactory bulb (David, Fourcaud-Trocmé et al., 2015)
This model, a simplified olfactory bulb network with mitral and granule cells, proposes a framework for two regimes of oscillation in the olfactory bulb: 1 - a weak inhibition regime (with no granule spike) where the network oscillates in the gamma (40-90Hz) band 2 - a strong inhibition regime (with granule spikes) where the network oscillates in the beta (15-30Hz) band. Slow modulations of sensory and centrifugal inputs, phase shifted by a quarter of cycle, possibly combined with short term depression of the mitral to granule AMPA synapse, allows the network to alternate between the two regimes as observed in anesthetized animals.
5.  MDD: the role of glutamate dysfunction on Cingulo-Frontal NN dynamics (Ramirez-Mahaluf et al 2017)
" ...Currently, no mechanistic framework describes how network dynamics, glutamate, and serotonin interact to explain MDD symptoms and treatments. Here, we built a biophysical computational model of 2 areas (vACC and dlPFC) that can switch between emotional and cognitive processing. (Major Depression Disease) MDD networks were simulated by slowing glutamate decay in vACC and demonstrated sustained vACC activation. ..."
6.  Mechanisms underlying different onset patterns of focal seizures (Wang Y et al 2017)
"Focal seizures are episodes of pathological brain activity that appear to arise from a localised area of the brain. The onset patterns of focal seizure activity have been studied intensively, and they have largely been distinguished into two types { low amplitude fast oscillations (LAF), or high amplitude spikes (HAS). Here we explore whether these two patterns arise from fundamentally different mechanisms. Here, we use a previously established computational model of neocortical tissue, and validate it as an adequate model using clinical recordings of focal seizures. We then reproduce the two onset patterns in their most defining properties and investigate the possible mechanisms underlying the different focal seizure onset patterns in the model. ..."
7.  Multitarget pharmacology for Dystonia in M1 (Neymotin et al 2016)
" ... We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. ..."
8.  Olfactory Bulb mitral-granule network generates beta oscillations (Osinski & Kay 2016)
This model of the dendrodendritic mitral-granule synaptic network generates gamma and beta oscillations as a function of the granule cell excitability, which is represented by the granule cell resting membrane potential.
9.  Striatal FSI and SPN oscillation model (Chartove et al. 2020)
Our model consists of three interconnected populations of single or double compartment Hodgkin-Huxley neurons: a feedforward network of FSIs, and two networks of SPNs (the D1 receptor-expressing "direct pathway" subnetwork and the D2 receptor-expressing "indirect pathway" subnetwork).
10.  Thalamo-cortical microcircuit (TCM) (AmirAli Farokhniaee and Madeleine M. Lowery 2021)
This is a model of exaggerated beta rhythm observed in the motor cortex, similar to animal and humans with Parkinson’s disease. It is obtained by manually changing the specific cortical, thalamic and thalamocortical synaptic connections, motivated by the previous studies in the field. More importantly and in addition, it serves as a thalamocortical network model of deep brain stimulation, a therapy used for Parkinson’s disease. We computationally stimulated the layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the cortex by direct injected currents to those pyramidal cells and observed well-known patterns in experimental studies, such as attenuation of the exaggerated beta rhythm, formation of excited and inhibited clusters of neurons in the motor cortex and the optimum value for the stimulation, both in amplitude and frequency domains, to obtain the most attenuated beta rhythm.

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