Models that contain the Receptor : GabaB

Re-display model names without descriptions
    Models   Description
1.  A Moth MGC Model-A HH network with quantitative rate reduction (Buckley & Nowotny 2011)
We provide the model used in Buckley & Nowotny (2011). It consists of a network of Hodgkin Huxley neurons coupled by slow GABA_B synapses which is run alongside a quantitative reduction described in the associated paper.
2.  Application of a common kinetic formalism for synaptic models (Destexhe et al 1994)
Application to AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptors is given in a book chapter. The reference paper synthesizes a comprehensive general description of synaptic transmission with Markov kinetic models. This framework is applicable to modeling ion channels, synaptic release, and all receptors. Please see the references for more details. A simple introduction to this method is given in a seperate paper Destexhe et al Neural Comput 6:14-18 , 1994). More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
3.  Biophysically realistic neural modeling of the MEG mu rhythm (Jones et al. 2009)
"Variations in cortical oscillations in the alpha (7–14 Hz) and beta (15–29 Hz) range have been correlated with attention, working memory, and stimulus detection. The mu rhythm recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a prominent oscillation generated by Rolandic cortex containing alpha and beta bands. Despite its prominence, the neural mechanisms regulating mu are unknown. We characterized the ongoing MEG mu rhythm from a localized source in the finger representation of primary somatosensory (SI) cortex. Subjects showed variation in the relative expression of mu-alpha or mu-beta, which were nonoverlapping for roughly 50% of their respective durations on single trials. To delineate the origins of this rhythm, a biophysically principled computational neural model of SI was developed, with distinct laminae, inhibitory and excitatory neurons, and feedforward (FF, representative of lemniscal thalamic drive) and feedback (FB, representative of higher-order cortical drive or input from nonlemniscal thalamic nuclei) inputs defined by the laminar location of their postsynaptic effects. ..."
4.  Ca+/HCN channel-dependent persistent activity in multiscale model of neocortex (Neymotin et al 2016)
"Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. ..."
5.  CA1 network model for place cell dynamics (Turi et al 2019)
Biophysical model of CA1 hippocampal region. The model simulates place cells/fields and explores the place cell dynamics as function of VIP+ interneurons.
6.  CA1 network model: interneuron contributions to epileptic deficits (Shuman et al 2019)
Temporal lobe epilepsy causes significant cognitive deficits in both humans and rodents, yet the specific circuit mechanisms underlying these deficits remain unknown. There are profound and selective interneuron death and axonal reorganization within the hippocampus of both humans and animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy. To assess the specific contribution of these mechanisms on spatial coding, we developed a biophysically constrained network model of the CA1 region that consists of different subtypes of interneurons. More specifically, our network consists of 150 cells, 130 excitatory pyramidal cells and 20 interneurons (Fig. 1A). To simulate place cell formation in the network model, we generated grid cell and place cell inputs from the Entorhinal Cortex (ECLIII) and CA3 regions, respectively, activated in a realistic manner as observed when an animal transverses a linear track. Realistic place fields emerged in a subpopulation of pyramidal cells (40-50%), in which similar EC and CA3 grid cell inputs converged onto distal/proximal apical and basal dendrites. The tuning properties of these cells are very similar to the ones observed experimentally in awake, behaving animals To examine the role of interneuron death and axonal reorganization in the formation and/or tuning properties of place fields we selectively varied the contribution of each interneuron type and desynchronized the two excitatory inputs. We found that desynchronized inputs were critical in reproducing the experimental data, namely the profound reduction in place cell numbers, stability and information content. These results demonstrate that the desynchronized firing of hippocampal neuronal populations contributes to poor spatial processing in epileptic mice, during behavior. Given the lack of experimental data on the selective contributions of interneuron death and axonal reorganization in spatial memory, our model findings predict the mechanistic effects of these alterations at the cellular and network levels.
7.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: as a 2-layer NN and subthreshold synaptic summation (Poirazi et al 2003)
We developed a CA1 pyramidal cell model calibrated with a broad spectrum of in vitro data. Using simultaneous dendritic and somatic recordings, and combining results for two different response measures (peak vs. mean EPSP), two different stimulus formats (single shock vs. 50 Hz trains), and two different spatial integration conditions (within vs. between-branch summation), we found the cell's subthreshold responses to paired inputs are best described as a sum of nonlinear subunit responses, where the subunits correspond to different dendritic branches. In addition to suggesting a new type of experiment and providing testable predictions, our model shows how conclusions regarding synaptic arithmetic can be influenced by an array of seemingly innocuous experimental design choices.
8.  CA1 pyramidal neuron: nonlinear a5-GABAAR controls synaptic NMDAR activation (Schulz et al 2018)
The study shows that IPSCs mediated by a5-subunit containing GABAA receptors are strongly outward-rectifying generating 4-fold larger conductances above -50?mV than at rest. Experiments and modeling show that synaptic activation of these receptors can very effectively control voltage-dependent NMDA-receptor activation in a spatiotemporally controlled manner in fine dendrites of CA1 pyramidal cells. The files contain the NEURON code for Fig.8, Fig.S8 and Fig.S9 of the paper. The model is based on the model published by Bloss et al., 2017. Physiological properties of GABA synapses were modified as determined by optogenetic activation of inputs during voltage-clamp recordings in Schulz et al. 2018. Other changes include stochastic synaptic release and short-term synaptic plasticity. All changes of mechanisms and parameters are detailed in the Methods of the paper. Simulation can be run by starting start_simulation.hoc after running mknrndll. The files that model the individual figures have to be uncommented in start_simulation.hoc beforehand.
9.  Coding of stimulus frequency by latency in thalamic networks (Golomb et al 2005)
The paper presents models of the rat vibrissa processing system including the posterior medial (POm) thalamus, ventroposterior medial (VPm) thalamus, and GABAB- mediated feedback inhibition from the reticular thalamic (Rt) nucleus. A clear match between the experimentally measured spike-rates and the numerically calculated rates for the full model occurs when VPm thalamus receives stronger brainstem input and weaker GABAB-mediated inhibition than POm thalamus.
10.  Composite spiking network/neural field model of Parkinsons (Kerr et al 2013)
This code implements a composite model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The composite model consists of a leaky integrate-and-fire spiking neuronal network model being driven by output from a neural field model (instead of the more usual white noise drive). Three different sets of parameters were used for the field model: one with basal ganglia parameters based on data from healthy individuals, one based on data from individuals with PD, and one purely thalamocortical model. The aim of this model is to explore how the different dynamical patterns in each each of these field models affects the activity in the network model.
11.  Cortical network model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis (Bush et al 1999)
This simulation from Bush, Prince, and Miller 1999 shows the epileptiform response (Fig. 6C) to a brief single stimulation in a 500 cell network of multicompartment models, some of which have active dendrites. The results which I obtained under Redhat Linux is shown in result.gif. Original 1997 code from Paul Bush modified slightly by Bill Lytton to make it work with current version of NEURON (5.7.139). Thanks to Paul Bush and Ken Miller for making the code available.
12.  Current Dipole in Laminar Neocortex (Lee et al. 2013)
Laminar neocortical model in NEURON/Python, adapted from Jones et al 2009. https://bitbucket.org/jonescompneurolab/corticaldipole
13.  Dynamic cortical interlaminar interactions (Carracedo et al. 2013)
"... Here we demonstrate the mechanism underlying a purely neocortical delta rhythm generator and show a remarkable laminar, cell subtype and local subcircuit delineation between delta and nested theta rhythms. We show that spike timing during delta-nested theta rhythms controls an iterative, reciprocal interaction between deep and superficial cortical layers resembling the unsupervised learning processes proposed for laminar neural networks by Hinton and colleagues ... and mimicking the alternating cortical dynamics of sensory and memory processing during wakefulness."
14.  Effects of increasing CREB on storage and recall processes in a CA1 network (Bianchi et al. 2014)
Several recent results suggest that boosting the CREB pathway improves hippocampal-dependent memory in healthy rodents and restores this type of memory in an AD mouse model. However, not much is known about how CREB-dependent neuronal alterations in synaptic strength, excitability and LTP can boost memory formation in the complex architecture of a neuronal network. Using a model of a CA1 microcircuit, we investigate whether hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron properties altered by increasing CREB activity may contribute to improve memory storage and recall. With a set of patterns presented to a network, we find that the pattern recall quality under AD-like conditions is significantly better when boosting CREB function with respect to control. The results are robust and consistent upon increasing the synaptic damage expected by AD progression, supporting the idea that the use of CREB-based therapies could provide a new approach to treat AD.
15.  Efficient simulation environment for modeling large-scale cortical processing (Richert et al. 2011)
"We have developed a spiking neural network simulator, which is both easy to use and computationally efficient, for the generation of large-scale computational neuroscience models. The simulator implements current or conductance based Izhikevich neuron networks, having spike-timing dependent plasticity and short-term plasticity. ..."
16.  Hippocampal CA1 NN with spontaneous theta, gamma: full scale & network clamp (Bezaire et al 2016)
This model is a full-scale, biologically constrained rodent hippocampal CA1 network model that includes 9 cells types (pyramidal cells and 8 interneurons) with realistic proportions of each and realistic connectivity between the cells. In addition, the model receives realistic numbers of afferents from artificial cells representing hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortical layer III. The model is fully scaleable and parallelized so that it can be run at small scale on a personal computer or large scale on a supercomputer. The model network exhibits spontaneous theta and gamma rhythms without any rhythmic input. The model network can be perturbed in a variety of ways to better study the mechanisms of CA1 network dynamics. Also see online code at http://bitbucket.org/mbezaire/ca1 and further information at http://mariannebezaire.com/models/ca1
17.  Ionic mechanisms of bursting in CA3 pyramidal neurons (Xu and Clancy 2008)
"... We present a single-compartment model of a CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neuron based on recent experimental data. We then use the model to determine the roles of primary depolarizing currents in burst generation. The single compartment model incorporates accurate representations of sodium (Na+) channels (NaV1.1) and T-type calcium (Ca2+) channel subtypes (CaV3.1, CaV3.2, and CaV3.3). Our simulations predict the importance of Na+ and T-type Ca2+ channels in hippocampal pyramidal cell bursting and reveal the distinct contribution of each subtype to burst morphology. We also performed fastslow analysis in a reduced comparable model, which shows that our model burst is generated as a result of the interaction of two slow variables, the T-type Ca2+ channel activation gate and the Ca2+-dependent potassium (K+) channel activation gate. The model reproduces a range of experimentally observed phenomena including afterdepolarizing potentials, spike widening at the end of the burst, and rebound. Finally, we use the model to simulate the effects of two epilepsy-linked mutations: R1648H in NaV1.1 and C456S in CaV3.2, both of which result in increased cellular excitability."
18.  Kinetic synaptic models applicable to building networks (Destexhe et al 1998)
Simplified AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, and GABAB receptor models useful for building networks are described in a book chapter. One reference paper synthesizes a comprehensive general description of synaptic transmission with Markov kinetic models which is applicable to modeling ion channels, synaptic release, and all receptors. Also a simple introduction to this method is given in a seperate paper Destexhe et al Neural Comput 6:14-18 , 1994). More information and papers at http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and through email: Destexhe@iaf.cnrs-gif.fr
19.  Knox implementation of Destexhe 1998 spike and wave oscillation model (Knox et al 2018)
" ...The aim of this study was to use an established thalamocortical computer model to determine how T-type calcium channels work in concert with cortical excitability to contribute to pathogenesis and treatment response in CAE. METHODS: The model is comprised of cortical pyramidal, cortical inhibitory, thalamocortical relay, and thalamic reticular single-compartment neurons, implemented with Hodgkin-Huxley model ion channels and connected by AMPA, GABAA , and GABAB synapses. Network behavior was simulated for different combinations of T-type calcium channel conductance, inactivation time, steady state activation/inactivation shift, and cortical GABAA conductance. RESULTS: Decreasing cortical GABAA conductance and increasing T-type calcium channel conductance converted spindle to spike and wave oscillations; smaller changes were required if both were changed in concert. In contrast, left shift of steady state voltage activation/inactivation did not lead to spike and wave oscillations, whereas right shift reduced network propensity for oscillations of any type...."
20.  L5 PFC microcircuit used to study persistent activity (Papoutsi et al. 2014, 2013)
Using a heavily constrained biophysical model of a L5 PFC microcircuit we investigate the mechanisms that underlie persistent activity emergence (ON) and termination (OFF) and search for the minimum network size required for expressing these states within physiological regimes.
21.  L5 PFC pyramidal neurons (Papoutsi et al. 2017)
" ... Here, we use a modeling approach to investigate whether and how the morphology of the basal tree mediates the functional output of neurons. We implemented 57 basal tree morphologies of layer 5 prefrontal pyramidal neurons of the rat and identified morphological types which were characterized by different response features, forming distinct functional types. These types were robust to a wide range of manipulations (distribution of active ionic mechanisms, NMDA conductance, somatic and apical tree morphology or the number of activated synapses) and supported different temporal coding schemes at both the single neuron and the microcircuit level. We predict that the basal tree morphological diversity among neurons of the same class mediates their segregation into distinct functional pathways. ..."
22.  Layer V PFC pyramidal neuron used to study persistent activity (Sidiropoulou & Poirazi 2012)
"... Here, we use a compartmental modeling approach to search for discriminatory features in the properties of incoming stimuli to a PFC pyramidal neuron and/or its response that signal which of these stimuli will result in persistent activity emergence. Furthermore, we use our modeling approach to study cell-type specific differences in persistent activity properties, via implementing a regular spiking (RS) and an intrinsic bursting (IB) model neuron. ... Collectively, our results pinpoint to specific features of the neuronal response to a given stimulus that code for its ability to induce persistent activity and predict differential roles of RS and IB neurons in persistent activity expression. "
23.  MEG of Somatosensory Neocortex (Jones et al. 2007)
"... To make a direct and principled connection between the SI (somatosensory primary neocortex magnetoencephalography) waveform and underlying neural dynamics, we developed a biophysically realistic computational SI model that contained excitatory and inhibitory neurons in supragranular and infragranular layers. ... our model provides a biophysically realistic solution to the MEG signal and can predict the electrophysiological correlates of human perception."
24.  Motor system model with reinforcement learning drives virtual arm (Dura-Bernal et al 2017)
"We implemented a model of the motor system with the following components: dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), primary motor cortex (M1), spinal cord and musculoskeletal arm (Figure 1). PMd modulated M1 to select the target to reach, M1 excited the descending spinal cord neurons that drove the arm muscles, and received arm proprioceptive feedback (information about the arm position) via the ascending spinal cord neurons. The large-scale model of M1 consisted of 6,208 spiking Izhikevich model neurons [37] of four types: regular-firing and bursting pyramidal neurons, and fast-spiking and low-threshold-spiking interneurons. These were distributed across cortical layers 2/3, 5A, 5B and 6, with cell properties, proportions, locations, connectivity, weights and delays drawn primarily from mammalian experimental data [38], [39], and described in detail in previous work [29]. The network included 486,491 connections, with synapses modeling properties of four different receptors ..."
25.  Multitarget pharmacology for Dystonia in M1 (Neymotin et al 2016)
" ... We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. ..."
26.  MyFirstNEURON (Houweling, Sejnowski 1997)
MyFirstNEURON is a NEURON demo by Arthur Houweling and Terry Sejnowski. Perform experiments from the book 'Electrophysiology of the Neuron, A Companion to Shepherd's Neurobiology, An Interactive Tutorial' by John Huguenard & David McCormick, Oxford University Press 1997, or design your own one or two cell simulation.
27.  NMDAR & GABAB/KIR Give Bistable Dendrites: Working Memory & Sequence Readout (Sanders et al., 2013)
" ...Here, we show that the voltage dependence of the inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) conductance activated by GABA(B) receptors adds substantial robustness to network simulations of bistability and the persistent firing that it underlies. The hyperpolarized state is robust because, at hyperpolarized potentials, the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is high and the NMDA conductance is low; the depolarized state is robust because, at depolarized potentials, the NMDA conductance is high and the GABA(B)/KIR conductance is low. Our results suggest that this complementary voltage dependence of GABA(B)/KIR and NMDA conductances makes them a "perfect couple" for producing voltage bistability."
28.  Paired turbulence and light effect on calcium increase in Hermissenda (Blackwell 2004)
The sea slug Hermissenda learns to associate light and hair cell stimulation, but not when the stimuli are temporally uncorrelated...These issues were addressed using a multi-compartmental computer model of phototransduction, calcium dynamics, and ionic currents of the Hermissenda photoreceptor...simulations show that a potassium leak channel, which closes with an increase in calcium, is required to produce both the untrained LLD and the enhanced LLD due to the decrease in voltage dependent potassium currents.
29.  Pyramidal neuron, fast, regular, and irregular spiking interneurons (Konstantoudaki et al 2014)
This is a model network of prefrontal cortical microcircuit based primarily on rodent data. It includes 16 pyramidal model neurons, 2 fast spiking interneuron models, 1 regular spiking interneuron model and 1 irregular spiking interneuron model. The goal of the paper was to use this model network to determine the role of specific interneuron subtypes in persistent activity
30.  Pyramidal Neuron: Deep, Thalamic Relay and Reticular, Interneuron (Destexhe et al 1998, 2001)
This package shows single-compartment models of different classes of cortical neurons, such as the "regular-spiking", "fast-spiking" and "bursting" (LTS) neurons. The mechanisms included are the Na+ and K+ currents for generating action potentials (INa, IKd), the T-type calcium current (ICaT), and a slow voltage-dependent K+ current (IM). See http://cns.fmed.ulaval.ca/alain_demos.html
31.  Short Term Depression, Presynaptic Inhib., Neuron Diversity Roles in Antennal Lobe (Wei & Lo 2020)
32.  Simulations of oscillations in piriform cortex (Wilson & Bower 1992)
"1. A large-scale computer model of the piriform cortex was constructed on the basis of the known anatomic and physiological organization of this region. 2. The oscillatory field potential and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity generated by the model was compared with actual physiological results. The model was able to produce patterns of activity similar to those recorded physiologically in response to both weak and strong electrical shocks to the afferent input. The model also generated activity patterns similar to EEGs recorded in behaving animals. 3. ..."
33.  Sleep-wake transitions in corticothalamic system (Bazhenov et al 2002)
The authors investigate the transition between sleep and awake states with intracellular recordings in cats and computational models. The model describes many essential features of slow wave sleep and activated states as well as the transition between them.
34.  Spatial summation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs in pyramidal neurons (Hao et al. 2010)
"... Based on realistic modeling and experiments in rat hippocampal slices, we derived a simple arithmetic rule for spatial summation of concurrent excitatory glutamatergic inputs (E) and inhibitory GABAergic inputs (I). The somatic response can be well approximated as the sum of the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP), the inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP), and a nonlinear term proportional to their product (k*EPSP*IPSP), where the coefficient k reflects the strength of shunting effect. ..."
35.  Synchrony by synapse location (McTavish et al. 2012)
This model considers synchrony between mitral cells induced via shared granule cell interneurons while taking into account the spatial constraints of the system. In particular, since inhibitory inputs decay passively along the lateral dendrites, this model demonstrates that an optimal arrangement of the inhibitory synapses will be near the cell bodies of the relevant mitral cells.
36.  Thalamic network model of deep brain stimulation in essential tremor (Birdno et al. 2012)
"... Thus the decreased effectiveness of temporally irregular DBS trains is due to long pauses in the stimulus trains, not the degree of temporal irregularity alone. We also conducted computer simulations of neuronal responses to the experimental stimulus trains using a biophysical model of the thalamic network. Trains that suppressed tremor in volunteers also suppressed fluctuations in thalamic transmembrane potential at the frequency associated with cerebellar burst-driver inputs. Clinical and computational findings indicate that DBS suppresses tremor by masking burst-driver inputs to the thalamus and that pauses in stimulation prevent such masking. Although stimulation of other anatomic targets may provide tremor suppression, we propose that the most relevant neuronal targets for effective tremor suppression are the afferent cerebellar fibers that terminate in the thalamus."
37.  Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1994)
Demo for simulating networks of thalamic reticular neurons (reproduces figures from Destexhe A et al 1994)
38.  Thalamic transformation of pallidal input (Hadipour-Niktarash 2006)
"In Parkinson’s disease, neurons of the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi) display the low-frequency tremor-related oscillations. These oscillatory activities are transmitted to the thalamic relay nuclei. Computer models of the interacting thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons were used to explore how the TC-RE network processes the low-frequency oscillations of the GPi neurons. ..."
39.  Thalamocortical loop with delay for investigation of absence epilepsy (Liu et al 2019)
Conductance based network model of one thalamic reticular neuron, one thalamic pyramidal neuron and one cortical pyramidal neuron. Used to show that large delay in the corticothalamic connection can lead to multistability.
40.  Thalamocortical and Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1996)
NEURON model of oscillations in networks of thalamocortical and thalamic reticular neurons in the ferret. (more applications for a model quantitatively identical to previous DLGN model; updated for NEURON v4 and above)
41.  Thalamocortical augmenting response (Bazhenov et al 1998)
In the cortical model, augmenting responses were more powerful in the "input" layer compared with those in the "output" layer. Cortical stimulation of the network model produced augmenting responses in cortical neurons in distant cortical areas through corticothalamocortical loops and low-threshold intrathalamic augmentation. ... The predictions of the model were compared with in vivo recordings from neurons in cortical area 4 and thalamic ventrolateral nucleus of anesthetized cats. The known intrinsic properties of thalamic cells and thalamocortical interconnections can account for the basic properties of cortical augmenting responses. See reference for details. NEURON implementation note: cortical SU cells are getting slightly too little stimulation - reason unknown.
42.  Thalamocortical control of propofol phase-amplitude coupling (Soplata et al 2017)
"The anesthetic propofol elicits many different spectral properties on the EEG, including alpha oscillations (8-12 Hz), Slow Wave Oscillations (SWO, 0.1-1.5 Hz), and dose-dependent phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between alpha and SWO. Propofol is known to increase GABAA inhibition and decrease H-current strength, but how it generates these rhythms and their interactions is still unknown. To investigate both generation of the alpha rhythm and its PAC to SWO, we simulate a Hodgkin-Huxley network model of a hyperpolarized thalamus and corticothalamic inputs. ..."
43.  Thalamocortical model of spike and wave seizures (Suffczynski et al. 2004)
SIMULINK macroscopic model of transitions between normal (spindle) activity and spike and wave (SW) discharges in the thalamocortical network. The model exhibits bistability properties and stochastic fluctuations present in the network may flip the system between the two operational states. The predictions of the model were compared with real EEG data in rats and humans. A possibility to abort an ictal state by a single counter stimulus is suggested by the model.
44.  Theta phase precession in a model CA3 place cell (Baker and Olds 2007)
"... The present study concerns a neurobiologically based computational model of the emergence of theta phase precession in which the responses of a single model CA3 pyramidal cell are examined in the context of stimulation by realistic afferent spike trains including those of place cells in entorhinal cortex, dentate gyrus, and other CA3 pyramidal cells. Spike-timing dependent plasticity in the model CA3 pyramidal cell leads to a spatially correlated associational synaptic drive that subsequently creates a spatially asymmetric expansion of the model cell’s place field. ... Through selective manipulations of the model it is possible to decompose theta phase precession in CA3 into the separate contributing factors of inheritance from upstream afferents in the dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex, the interaction of synaptically controlled increasing afferent drive with phasic inhibition, and the theta phase difference between dentate gyrus granule cell and CA3 pyramidal cell activity."
45.  Turtle visual cortex model (Nenadic et al. 2003, Wang et al. 2005, Wang et al. 2006)
This is a model of the visual cortex of freshwater turtles that is based upon the known anatomy and physiology of individual neurons. The model was published in three papers (Nenadic et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2005; Wang et al., 2006), which should be consulted for full details on its construction. The model has also been used in several papers (Robbins and Senseman, 2004; Du et al., 2005; Du et al., 2006). It is implemented in GENESIS (Bower and Beeman, 1998).

Re-display model names without descriptions