Models that contain the Model Concept : Excitability

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    Models   Description
1.  A model of ventral Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons of Tg2576 AD mice (Spoleti et al. 2021)
Gradual decline in cognitive and non-cognitive functions are considered clinical hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Post-mortem autoptic analysis shows the presence of amyloid ß deposits, neuroinflammation and severe brain atrophy. However, brain circuit alterations and cellular derailments, assessed in very early stages of AD, still remain elusive. The understanding of these early alterations is crucial to tackle defective mechanisms. In a previous study we proved that the Tg2576 mouse model of AD displays functional deficits in the dorsal hippocampus and relevant behavioural AD-related alterations. We had shown that these deficits in Tg2576 mice correlate with the precocious degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons in the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) and can be restored by L-DOPA treatment. Due to the distinct functionality and connectivity of dorsal versus ventral hippocampus, here we investigated neuronal excitability and synaptic functionality in the ventral CA1 hippocampal sub-region of Tg2576 mice. We found an age-dependent alteration of cell excitability and firing in pyramidal neurons starting at 3 months of age, that correlates with reduced levels in the ventral CA1 of tyrosine hydroxylase – the rate-limiting enzyme of DA synthesis. Additionally, at odds with the dorsal hippocampus, we found no alterations in basal glutamatergic transmission and long-term plasticity of ventral neurons in 8-month old Tg2576 mice compared to age-matched controls. Last, we used computational analysis to model the early derailments of firing properties observed and hypothesize that the neuronal alterations found could depend on dysfunctional sodium and potassium conductances, leading to anticipated depolarization-block of action potential firing. The present study depicts that impairment of cell excitability and homeostatic control of firing in ventral CA1 pyramidal neurons is a prodromal feature in Tg2576 AD mice.
2.  Coincidence detection in MSO principal cells (Goldwyn et al. 2019)
How a particular combination of anatomical and biophysical properties results in a short integration window (good for detection of closely-coincident inputs) while also enabling efficient axonal firing with brief interspike intervals (needed to faithfully report a series of coincidences between high frequency presynaptic spike trains).
3.  Diameter, Myelination and Na/K pump interactions affect axonal resilience to high frequency spiking
4.  Hippocampal CA3 thorny and a-thorny principal neuron models (Linaro et al in review)
This repository contains two populations of biophysically detailed models of murine hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons based on the two principal cell types that comprise this region. They are the result of a data-driven approach aimed at optimizing the model parameters by utilizing high-resolution morphological reconstructions and patch-clamp electrophysiology data together with a multi-objective optimization algorithm. The models quantitatively match the cell type-specific firing phenotypes and recapitulate the intrinsic population-level variability observed in the data. Additionally, the conductance values found by the optimization algorithm are consistent with differentially expressed ion channel genes in single-cell transcriptomic data for the two cell types. The models have further been employed to investigate the cell type-specific biophysical properties involved in the generation of complex-spiking output driven by synaptic input and to show that a-thorny bursting cells are capable of encoding more information in their firing output than their counterparts, thorny regular spiking neurons. Reference: Linaro D, Levy MJ, and Hunt, DL. Cell type-specific mechanisms of information transfer in data-driven biophysical models of hippocampal CA3 principal neurons. (2022) PLOS Computational Biology
5.  Locus Coeruleus blocking model (Chowdhury et al. accepted)
"... Here, we show that Locus Coeruleus (LC) cells projecting to dCA1 have a key permissive role in contextual memory linking, without affecting contextual memory formation, and that this effect is mediated by dopamine. Additionally, we found that LC to dCA1 projecting neurons modulate the excitability of dCA1 neurons, and the extent of overlap between dCA1 memory ensembles, as well as the stability of coactivity patterns within these ensembles..."

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