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Models that contain the Model Topic : Action Potential Initiation

(The spatial pattern or sequence of ion channel and/or receptor activation that precedes an action potential.)

   Models   Description
A Model of Multiple Spike Initiation Zones in the Leech C-interneuron (Crisp 2009)
The leech C-interneuron and its electrical synapse with the S-interneuron exhibit unusual properties: an asymmetric delay when impulses travel from one soma to the other, and graded C-interneuron impulse amplitudes under elevated divalent cation concentrations. These properties have been simulated using a SNNAP model in which the C-interneuron has multiple, independent spike initiation zones associated with individual electrical junctions with the C-interneuron.
A set of reduced models of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (Bahl et al. 2012)
These are the NEURON files for 10 different models of a reduced L5 pyramidal neuron. The parameters were obtained by automatically fitting the models to experimental data using a multi objective evolutionary search strategy. Details on the algorithm can be found at www.g-node.org/emoo and in Bahl et al. (2012).
A threshold equation for action potential initiation (Platkiewicz & Brette 2010)
"We examined in models the influence of Na channel activation, inactivation, slow voltage-gated channels and synaptic conductances on spike threshold. We propose a threshold equation which quantifies the contribution of all these mechanisms. It provides an instantaneous time-varying value of the threshold, which applies to neurons with fluctuating inputs. ... We find that spike threshold depends logarithmically on Na channel density, and that Na channel inactivation and K channels can dynamically modulate it in an adaptive way: the threshold increases with membrane potential and after every action potential. " See paper for more.
Action Potential initiation and backpropagation in Neocortical L5 Pyramidal Neuron (Hu et al. 2009)
"...Previous computational studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the role of Na+ channel density and biophysical properties in action potential initiation as a result of inconsistent estimates of channel density. Our modeling studies integrated the immunostaining and electrophysiological results and showed that the lowest threshold for action potential initiation at the distal AIS was largely determined by the density of low-threshold Nav1.6 channels ... Distinct from the function of Nav1.6 channel, the Nav1.2 channel may control action potential backpropagation because of its high density at the proximal AIS and high threshold. ... In conclusion, distal AIS accumulation of Nav1.6 channels determines the low threshold for action potential initiation; whereas proximal AIS accumulation of Nav1.2 channels sets the threshold for the generation of somatodendritic potentials and ensures action potential backpropagation to the soma and dendrites. Thus, Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 channels serve distinct functions in action potential initiation and backpropagation."
Active dendrites and spike propagation in a hippocampal interneuron (Saraga et al 2003)
We create multi-compartment models of an Oriens-Lacunosum/Moleculare (O-LM) hippocampal interneuron using passive properties, channel kinetics, densities and distributions specific to this cell type, and explore its signaling characteristics. We find that spike initiation depends on both location and amount of input, as well as the intrinsic properties of the interneuron. Distal synaptic input always produces strong back-propagating spikes whereas proximal input could produce both forward and back-propagating spikes depending on the input strength. Please see paper for more details. Fernanda.Saraga@utoronto.ca
AP back-prop. explains threshold variability and rapid rise (McCormick et al. 2007, Yu et al. 2008)
This simple axon-soma model explained how the rapid rising phase in the somatic spike is derived from the propagated axon initiated spike, and how the somatic spike threshold variance is affected by spike propagation.
AP initiation and propagation in type II cochlear ganglion cell (Hossain et al 2005)
The model of type II cochlear ganglion cell was based on the immunostaining of the mouse auditory pathway. Specific antibodies were used to map the distribution of voltage-dependent sodium channels along the two unmyelinated axon-like processes of the bipolar ganglion cells. Three distinct hot spots were detected. A high density of sodium channels was present over the entire trajectory of sensory endings beneath the outer hair cells (the most distal portion of the peripheral axon). THE other two hot spots were localized in the initial segments of both of the axons that flank the unmyelinated bipolar ganglion cell bodies.

A biophysical model indicates that all three hot spots might play important roles in action potential initiation and propagation. For instance, the hot spot in the receptor segment is important for transforming the receptor potentials into a full blown action potential (Supplemental Fig. 1). The hot spots in the two paraganglionic axon initial segments are there to ensure the successful propagation of action potentials from the peripheral to the central axon through the cell body.

The Readme.txt file provides step by step instructions on how to recreate Figures 6 and 7 of Hossain et al., 2005 paper.

Artificial neuron model (Izhikevich 2003)
A model is presented that reproduces spiking and bursting behavior of known types of cortical neurons. The model combines the biologically plausibility of Hodgkin–Huxley-type dynamics and the computational efficiency of integrate-and-fire neurons. Using this model, one can simulate tens of thousands of spiking cortical neurons in real time (1 ms resolution) using a desktop PC.
Axonal NaV1.6 Sodium Channels in AP Initiation of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons (Royeck et al. 2008)
"... We show that the Na+ channel NaV1.6 displays a striking aggregation at the AIS of cortical neurons. ... In combination with simulations using a realistic computer model of a CA1 pyramidal cell, our results imply that a hyperpolarized voltage-dependence of activation of AIS NaV1.6 channels is important both in determining spike threshold and localizing spike initiation to the AIS. ... These results suggest that NaV1.6 subunits at the AIS contribute significantly to its role as spike trigger zone and shape repetitive discharge properties of CA1 neurons."
Biophysically detailed model of the mouse sino-atrial node cell (Kharche et al. 2011)
This model is developed to study the role of various electrophysiological mechanisms in generating cardiac pacemaking action potentials (APs).The model incorporates membrane ionic currents and intracellular mechanisms contributing to spontaneous mouse SAN APs. The model was validated by testing the functional roles of individual membrane currents in one and multiple parameter analyses.The roles of intracellular Ca2+-handling mechanisms on cardiac pacemaking were also investigated in the model.
Breakdown of accmmodation in nerve: a possible role for INAp (Hennings et al 2005)
The present modeling study suggests that persistent, low-threshold, rapidly activating sodium currents have a key role in breakdown of accommodation, and that breakdown of accommodation can be used as a tool for studying persistent sodium current under normal and pathological conditions. See paper for more and details.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: as a 2-layer NN and subthreshold synaptic summation (Poirazi et al 2003)
We developed a CA1 pyramidal cell model calibrated with a broad spectrum of in vitro data. Using simultaneous dendritic and somatic recordings, and combining results for two different response measures (peak vs. mean EPSP), two different stimulus formats (single shock vs. 50 Hz trains), and two different spatial integration conditions (within vs. between-branch summation), we found the cell's subthreshold responses to paired inputs are best described as a sum of nonlinear subunit responses, where the subunits correspond to different dendritic branches. In addition to suggesting a new type of experiment and providing testable predictions, our model shows how conclusions regarding synaptic arithmetic can be influenced by an array of seemingly innocuous experimental design choices.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: dendritic spike initiation (Gasparini et al 2004)
NEURON mod files from the paper: Sonia Gasparini, Michele Migliore, and Jeffrey C. Magee On the initiation and propagation of dendritic spikes in CA1 pyramidal neurons, J. Neurosci., J. Neurosci. 24:11046-11056 (2004).
CA1 pyramidal neuron: effects of Ih on distal inputs (Migliore et al 2004)
NEURON mod files from the paper: M. Migliore, L. Messineo, M. Ferrante Dendritic Ih selectively blocks temporal summation of unsynchronized distal inputs in CA1 pyramidal neurons, J.Comput. Neurosci. 16:5-13 (2004). The model demonstrates how the dendritic Ih in pyramidal neurons could selectively suppress AP generation for a volley of excitatory afferents when they are asynchronously and distally activated.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: functional significance of axonal Kv7 channels (Shah et al. 2008)
The model used in this paper confirmed the experimental findings suggesting that axonal Kv7 channels are critically and uniquely required for determining the inherent spontaneous firing of hippocampal CA1 pyramids, independently of alterations in synaptic activity. The model predicts that the axonal Kv7 density could be 3-5 times that at the soma.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: integration of subthreshold inputs from PP and SC (Migliore 2003)
The model shows how the experimentally observed increase in the dendritic density of Ih and IA could have a major role in constraining the temporal integration window for the main CA1 synaptic inputs.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: rebound spiking (Ascoli et al.2010)
The model demonstrates that CA1 pyramidal neurons support rebound spikes mediated by hyperpolarization-activated inward current (Ih), and normally masked by A-type potassium channels (KA). Partial KA reduction confined to one or few branches of the apical tuft may be sufficient to elicit a local spike following a train of synaptic inhibition. These data suggest that the plastic regulation of KA can provide a dynamic switch to unmask post-inhibitory spiking in CA1 pyramidal neurons, further increasing the signal processing power of the CA1 synaptic microcircuitry.
CA1 pyramidal neuron: signal propagation in oblique dendrites (Migliore et al 2005)
NEURON mod files from the paper: M. Migliore, M. Ferrante, GA Ascoli (2005). The model shows how the back- and forward propagation of action potentials in the oblique dendrites of CA1 neurons could be modulated by local properties such as morphology or active conductances.
CA1 stratum radiatum interneuron multicompartmental model (Katona et al. 2011)
The model examines dendritic NMDA-spike generation and propagation in the dendrites of CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons. It contains NMDA-channels in a clustered pattern on a dendrite and K-channels. The simulation shows the whole NMDA spike and the rising phase of the traces in separate windows.
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Lazarewicz et al 2002)
The model shows how using a CA1-like distribution of active dendritic conductances in a CA3 morphology results in dendritic initiation of spikes during a burst.
CA3 pyramidal neuron (Safiulina et al. 2010)
In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. To compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in postnatal development, a realistic model was constructed taking into account the different biophysical properties of these synapses.
Cerebellar purkinje cell: K and Ca channels regulate APs (Miyasho et al 2001)
We adopted De Schutter and Bower's model as the starting point, then modified the descriptions of several ion channels, such as the P-type Ca channel and the delayed rectifier K channel, and added class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels to the model. Our new model reproduces most of our experimental results and supports the conclusions of our experimental study that class-E Ca channels and D-type K channels are present and functioning in the dendrites of Purkinje neurons.
Compartmental model of a mitral cell (Popovic et al. 2005)
Usage of a morphologically realistic compartmental model of a mitral cell and data obtained from whole-cell patch-clamp and voltage-imaging experiments in order to explore passive parameter space in which reported low EPSP attenuation is observed.
Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
Complex CA1-neuron to study AP initiation (Wimmer et al. 2010)
Complex model of a pyramidal CA1-neuron, adapted from Royeck, M., et al. Role of axonal NaV1.6 sodium channels in action potential initiation of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Journal of neurophysiology 100, 2361-2380 (2008). It contains a biophysically realistic morphology comprising 265 compartments (829 segments) and 15 different distributed Ca2+- and/or voltage-dependent conductances.
Computational neuropharmacology of CA1 pyramidal neuron (Ferrante et al. 2008)
In this paper, the model was used to show how neuroactive drugs targeting different neuronal mechanisms affect the signal integration in CA1 pyramidal neuron. Ferrante M, Blackwell KT, Migliore M, Ascoli GA (2008)
DBS of a multi-compartment model of subthalamic nucleus projection neurons (Miocinovic et al. 2006)
We built a comprehensive computational model of subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in parkinsonian macaques to study the effects of stimulation in a controlled environment. The model consisted of three fundamental components: 1) a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical model of the macaque basal ganglia, 2) a finite element model of the DBS electrode and electric field transmitted to the tissue medium, and 3) multicompartment biophysical models of STN projection neurons, GPi fibers of passage, and internal capsule fibers of passage. Populations of neurons were positioned within the 3D anatomical model. Neurons were stimulated with electrode positions and stimulation parameters defined as clinically effective in two parkinsonian monkeys. The model predicted axonal activation of STN neurons and GPi fibers during STN DBS. Model predictions regarding the degree of GPi fiber activation matched well with experimental recordings in both monkeys.
Dendritic Na+ spike initiation and backpropagation of APs in active dendrites (Nevian et al. 2007)
NEURON model used to create simulations shown in figure 6 of the paper. The model includes two point processes; one for dendritic spike initiation and the other for somatic action potential generation. The effect of filtering by imperfect recording electrode can be examined in somatic and dendritic locations.
Dendritica (Vetter et al 2001)
Dendritica is a collection of programs for relating dendritic geometry and signal propagation. The programs are based on those used for the simulations described in: Vetter, P., Roth, A. & Hausser, M. (2001) For reprint requests and additional information please contact Dr. M. Hausser, email address: m.hausser@ucl.ac.uk
Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
Dopamine-modulated medium spiny neuron, reduced model (Humphries et al. 2009)
We extended Izhikevich's reduced model of the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) to account for dopaminergic modulation of its intrinsic ion channels and synaptic inputs. We tuned our D1 and D2 receptor MSN models using data from a recent (Moyer et al, 2007) large-scale compartmental model. Our new models capture the input-output relationships for both current injection and spiking input with remarkable accuracy, despite the order of magnitude decrease in system size. They also capture the paired pulse facilitation shown by MSNs. Our dopamine models predict that synaptic effects dominate intrinsic effects for all levels of D1 and D2 receptor activation. Our analytical work on these models predicts that the MSN is never bistable. Nonetheless, these MSN models can produce a spontaneously bimodal membrane potential similar to that recently observed in vitro following application of NMDA agonists. We demonstrate that this bimodality is created by modelling the agonist effects as slow, irregular and massive jumps in NMDA conductance and, rather than a form of bistability, is due to the voltage-dependent blockade of NMDA receptors
Dynamics of Spike Initiation (Prescott et al. 2008)
"Transduction of graded synaptic input into trains of all-or-none action potentials (spikes) is a crucial step in neural coding. Hodgkin identified three classes of neurons with qualitatively different analog-to-digital transduction properties. Despite widespread use of this classification scheme, a generalizable explanation of its biophysical basis has not been described. We recorded from spinal sensory neurons representing each class and reproduced their transduction properties in a minimal model. With phase plane and bifurcation analysis, each class of excitability was shown to derive from distinct spike initiating dynamics. Excitability could be converted between all three classes by varying single parameters; moreover, several parameters, when varied one at a time, had functionally equivalent effects on excitability. From this, we conclude that the spike-initiating dynamics associated with each of Hodgkin’s classes represent different outcomes in a nonlinear competition between oppositely directed, kinetically mismatched currents. ..."
Effects of KIR current inactivation in NAc Medium Spiny Neurons (Steephen and Manchanda 2009)
"Inward rectifying potassium (KIR) currents in medium spiny (MS) neurons of nucleus accumbens inactivate significantly in ~40% of the neurons but not in the rest, which may lead to differences in input processing by these two groups. Using a 189-compartment computational model of the MS neuron, we investigate the influence of this property using injected current as well as spatiotemporally distributed synaptic inputs. Our study demonstrates that KIR current inactivation facilitates depolarization, firing frequency and firing onset in these neurons. ..."
Effects of the membrane AHP on the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO) (Zhou & Colburn 2010)
This simulation study investigated how membrane afterhyperpolarization (AHP) influences spiking activity of neurons in the Lateral Superior Olive (LSO). The model incorporates a general integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with a first-order adaptation channel. Simulations focus on differentiating the effects of GAHP, tauAHP, and input strength on (1) spike interval statistics, such as negative serial correlation and chopper onset, and (2) neural sensitivity to interaural level difference (ILD) of LSO neurons. The model simulated electrophysiological data collected in cat LSO (Tsuchitani and Johnson, 1985).
Excitability of the soma in central nervous system neurons (Safronov et al 2000)
The ability of the soma of a spinal dorsal horn neuron, a spinal ventral horn neuron, and a hippocampal pyramidal neuron to generate action potentials was studied using experiments and computer simulations. By comparing recordings ... of a dorsal horn neuron with simulated responses, it was shown that computer models can be adequate for the study of somatic excitability. The modeled somata of both spinal neurons were unable to generate action potentials, showing only passive and local responses to current injections. ... In contrast to spinal neurons, the modeled soma of the hippocampal pyramidal neuron generated spikes with an overshoot of +9 mV. It is concluded that the somata of spinal neurons cannot generate action potentials and seem to resist their propagation from the axon to dendrites. ... See paper for more and details.
Fast sodium channel gating in mossy fiber axons (Schmidt-Heiber et al. 2010)
"... To study the mechanisms underlying AP initiation in unmyelinated hippocampal mossy fibers of adult mice, we recorded sodium currents in axonal and somatic membrane patches. We demonstrate that sodium channel density in the proximal axon is ~5 times higher than in the soma. Furthermore, sodium channel activation and inactivation are ~2 times faster. Modeling revealed that the fast activation localized the initiation site to the proximal axon even upon strong synaptic stimulation, while fast inactivation contributed to energy-efficient membrane charging during APs. ..."
Febrile seizure-induced modifications to Ih (Chen et al 2001)
Modeling and experiments in the paper Chen K,Aradi I, Thom N,Eghbal-Ahmadi M, Baram TZ, and Soltesz I (2001) support the hypothesis that modified Ih currents strongly influence inhibitory inputs in CA1 cells and that the depolarizing shift in Ih activation plays a primary role in this process. Please see the paper for details. Some modeling details are available at http://www.ucihs.uci.edu/anatomy/soltesz/supp.htm Correspondance should be addressed to isoltesz@uci.edu (modeling was done by Ildiko Aradi, iaradi@uci.edu)
Functional impact of dendritic branch point morphology (Ferrante et al., 2013)
" ... Here, we first quantified the morphological variability of branch points from two-photon images of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We then investigated the geometrical features affecting spike initiation, propagation, and timing with a computational model validated by glutamate uncaging experiments. The results suggest that even subtle membrane readjustments at branch point could drastically alter the ability of synaptic input to generate, propagate, and time action potentials."
Globus pallidus neuron models with differing dendritic Na channel expression (Edgerton et al., 2010)
A set of 9 multi-compartmental rat GP neuron models (585 compartments) differing only in their expression of dendritic fast sodium channels were compared in their synaptic integration properties. Dendritic fast sodium channels were found to increase the importance of distal synapses (both excitatory AND inhibitory), increase spike timing variability with in vivo-like synaptic input, and make the model neurons highly sensitive to clustered synchronous excitation.
High frequency oscillations induced in three gap-junction coupled neurons (Tseng et al. 2008)
Here we showed experimentally that high frequency oscillations (up to 600 Hz) were easily induced in a purely gap-junction coupled network by simple two stimuli with very short interval. The root cause is that the second elicited spike suffered from slow propagation speed and failure to transmit through a low-conductance junction. Similiar results were also obtained in these simulation.
IA and IT interact to set first spike latency (Molineux et al 2005)
Using patch clamp and modeling, we illustrate that spike latency characteristics are the product of an interplay between I(A) and low-threshold calcium current (I(T)) that requires a steady-state difference in the inactivation parameters of the currents. Furthermore, we show that the unique first-spike latency characteristics of stellate cells have important implications for the integration of coincident IPSPs and EPSPs, such that inhibition can shift first-spike latency to differentially modulate the probability of firing.
Intracortical synaptic potential modulation by presynaptic somatic potential (Shu et al. 2006, 2007)
" ... Here we show that the voltage fluctuations associated with dendrosomatic synaptic activity propagate significant distances along the axon, and that modest changes in the somatic membrane potential of the presynaptic neuron modulate the amplitude and duration of axonal action potentials and, through a Ca21- dependent mechanism, the average amplitude of the postsynaptic potential evoked by these spikes. These results indicate that synaptic activity in the dendrite and soma controls not only the pattern of action potentials generated, but also the amplitude of the synaptic potentials that these action potentials initiate in local cortical circuits, resulting in synaptic transmission that is a mixture of triggered and graded (analogue) signals."
Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
Leech Mechanosensory Neurons: Synaptic Facilitation by Reflected APs (Baccus 1998)
This model by Stephen Baccus explores the phenomena of action potential (AP) propagation at branch boints in axons. APs are sometimes transmitted down the efferent processes and sometimes are reflected back to the axon of AP origin or neither. See the paper for details. The model zip file contains a readme.txt which list introductory steps to follow to run the simulation. Stephen Baccus's email address: baccus@fas.harvard.edu
Mechanisms of magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons (Pashut et al. 2011)
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely applied tool for probing cognitive function in humans and is one of the best tools for clinical treatments and interfering with cognitive tasks. Surprisingly, while TMS has been commercially available for decades, the cellular mechanisms underlying magnetic stimulation remain unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using compartmental modeling. We generated a numerical scheme allowing simulation of the physiological response to magnetic stimulation of neurons with arbitrary morphologies and active properties. Computational experiments using this scheme suggested that TMS affects neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) primarily by somatic stimulation.
Model of repetitive firing in Grueneberg ganglion olfactory neurons (Liu et al., 2012)
This model is constructed based on properties of Na+ and K+ currents observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings of mouse Grueneberg ganglion neurons in acute slices. Two distinct Na+ conductances representing the TTX-sensitive and TTX-resistant currents and one delayed rectifier K+ currrent are included. By modulating the maximal conductances of Na+ currents, one can reproduce the regular, phasic, and sporadic patterns of repetitive firing found in the patch clamp experiments.
Modeling interactions in Aplysia neuron R15 (Yu et al 2004)
"The biophysical properties of neuron R15 in Aplysia endow it with the ability to express multiple modes of oscillatory electrical activity, such as beating and bursting. Previous modeling studies examined the ways in which membrane conductances contribute to the electrical activity of R15 and the ways in which extrinsic modulatory inputs alter the membrane conductances by biochemical cascades and influence the electrical activity. The goals of the present study were to examine the ways in which electrical activity influences the biochemical cascades and what dynamical properties emerge from the ongoing interactions between electrical activity and these cascades." See paper for more and details.
Multicompartmental cerebellar granule cell model (Diwakar et al. 2009)
A detailed multicompartmental model was used to study neuronal electroresponsiveness of cerebellar granule cells in rats. Here we show that, in cerebellar granule cells, Na+ channels are enriched in the axon, especially in the hillock, but almost absent from soma and dendrites. Numerical simulations indicated that granule cells have a compact electrotonic structure allowing EPSPs to diffuse with little attenuation from dendrites to axon. The spike arose almost simultaneously along the whole axonal ascending branch and invaded the hillock, whose activation promoted spike back-propagation with marginal delay (<200 micros) and attenuation (<20 mV) into the somato-dendritic compartment. For details check the cited article.
Multiscale model of olfactory receptor neuron in mouse (Dougherty 2009)
Collection of XPP (.ode) files simulating the signal transduction (slow) and action potential (fast) currents in the olfactory receptor neuron of mouse. Collection contains model configured for dual odorant pulse delivery and model configured for prolonged odorant delivery. For those interested more in transduction processes, each whole cell recording model comes with a counter part file configured to show just the slow transduction current for ease of use and convenience. These transduction-only models typically run faster than the full multi-scale models but do not demonstrate action potentials.
MyFirstNEURON (Houweling, Sejnowski 1997)
MyFirstNEURON is a NEURON demo by Arthur Houweling and Terry Sejnowski. Perform experiments from the book 'Electrophysiology of the Neuron, A Companion to Shepherd's Neurobiology, An Interactive Tutorial' by John Huguenard & David McCormick, Oxford University Press 1997, or design your own one or two cell simulation. For more information see http://www.cnl.salk.edu/Simulations. Salk Institute, Computational Neurobiology Lab, 10010 North Torrey Pines Rd., La Jolla CA 092037. Email: arthur@salk.edu
Na+ channel dependence of AP initiation in cortical pyramidal neuron (Kole et al. 2008)
In this simulation action potential initiation, action potential properties and the role of axon initial segment Na+ channels are investigated in a realistic model of a layer 5 pyramidal neuron axon initial segment. The main Na+ channel properties were constrained by experimental data and the axon initial segment was reconstructed. Model parameters were constrained by direct recordings at the axon initial segment.
NAcc medium spiny neuron: effects of cannabinoid withdrawal (Spiga et al. 2010)
Cannabinoid withdrawal produces a hypofunction of dopaminergic neurons targeting medium spiny neurons (MSN) of the forebrain. Administration of a CB1 receptor antagonist to control rats provoked structural abnormalities, reminiscent of those observed in withdrawal conditions and support the regulatory role of cannabinoids in neurogenesis, axonal growth and synaptogenesis. Experimental observations were incorporated into a realistic computational model which predicts a strong reduction in the excitability of morphologically-altered MSN, yielding a significant reduction in action potential output. These paper provided direct morphological evidence for functional abnormalities associated with cannabinoid dependence at the level of dopaminergic neurons and their post synaptic counterpart, supporting a hypodopaminergic state as a distinctive feature of the “addicted brain”.
Nav1.6 sodium channel model in globus pallidus neurons (Mercer et al. 2007)
Model files for the paper Mercer JN, Chan CS, Tkatch T, Held J, Surmeier DJ. Nav1.6 sodium channels are critical to pacemaking and fast spiking in globus pallidus neurons.,J Neurosci. 2007 Dec 5;27(49):13552-66.
Nodes of Ranvier with left-shifted Nav channels (Boucher et al. 2012)
The two programs CLSRanvier.f and propagation.f simulate the excitability of a myelinated axon with injured nodes of Ranvier. The injury is simulated as the Coupled Left Shift (CLS) of the activation(V) and inactivation(V) (availability) of a fraction of Nav channels.
Olfactory bulb cluster formation (Migliore et al. 2010)
Functional roles of distributed synaptic clusters in the mitral-granule cell network of the olfactory bulb.
Olfactory bulb granule cell: effects of odor deprivation (Saghatelyan et al 2005)
The model supports the experimental findings on the effects of postnatal odor deprivation, and shows that a -10mV shift in the Na activation or a reduction in the dendritic length of newborn GC could independently explain the observed increase in excitability.
Olfactory Mitral Cell (Shen et al 1999)
Mitral cell model with standard parameters for the paper: Shen, G.Y., Chen, W. R., Midtgaard, J., Shepherd, G.M., and Hines, M.L. (1999) Computational Analysis of Action Potential Initiation in Mitral Cell Soma and Dendrites Based on Dual Patch Recordings. Journal of Neurophysiology 82:3006. Contact Michael.Hines@yale.edu if you have any questions about the implementation of the model.
Olfactory Mitral cell: AP initiation modes (Chen et al 2002)
The mitral cell primary dendrite plays an important role in transmitting distal olfactory nerve input from olfactory glomerulus to the soma-axon initial segment. To understand how dendritic active properties are involved in this transmission, we have combined dual soma and dendritic patch recordings with computational modeling to analyze action-potential initiation and propagation in the primary dendrite.
Proximal inhibition of Renshaw cells (Bui et al 2005)
Inhibitory synaptic inputs to Renshaw cells are concentrated on the soma and the juxtasomatic dendrites. In the present study, we investigated whether this proximal bias leads to more effective inhibition under different neuronal operating conditions. Using compartmental models based on detailed anatomical measurements of intracellularly stained Renshaw cells, we compared the inhibition produced by GABAA synapses when distributed with a proximal bias to the inhibition produced when the same synapses were distributed uniformly. See paper for more and details.
Pyramidal neuron coincidence detection tuned by dendritic branching pattern (Schaefer et al 2006)
"... We examined the relationship between dendritic arborization and the coupling between somatic and dendritic action potential (AP) initiation sites in layer 5 (L5) neocortical pyramidal neurons. Coupling was defined as the relative reduction in threshold for initiation of a dendritic calcium AP due to a coincident back-propagating AP. Simulations based on reconstructions of biocytin-filled cells showed that addition of oblique branches of the main apical dendrite in close proximity to the soma (d < 140 um) increases the coupling between the apical and axosomatic AP initiation zones, whereas incorporation of distal branches decreases coupling. ... We conclude that variation in dendritic arborization may be a key determinant of variability in coupling (49+-17%; range 19-83%; n = 37) and is likely to outweigh the contribution made by variations in active membrane properties. Thus coincidence detection of inputs arriving from different cortical layers is strongly regulated by differences in dendritic arborization."
Salamander retinal ganglian cells: morphology influences firing (Sheasby, Fohlmeister 1999)
Nerve impulse entrainment and other excitation and passive phenomena are analyzed for a morphologically diverse and exhaustive data set (n=57) of realistic (3-dimensional computer traced) soma-dendritic tree structures of ganglion cells in the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) retina.
Selective control of cortical axonal spikes by a slowly inactivating K+ current (Shu et al. 2007)
We discovered a low-threshold, slowly inactivating K+ current, containing Kv1.2 alpha subunits, in axon initial segment, playing a key role in the modulation of spike threshold and spike duration as well as the spike timing in prefrontal cortex layer V pyramidal cell of ferrets and rats. A kd.mod file implements this D current and put it in the axonal model: Neuron_Dcurrent.hoc. Run the model to see the gradual modulation effect over seconds on spike shape.
Simulated light response in rod photoreceptors (Liu and Kourennyi 2004)
We developed a complete computer model of the rod, which accurately reproduced the main features of the light response and allowed us to demonstrate that it was suppression of Kx channels that was essential for slowing SLR and increasing excitability of rods. The results reported in this work further establish the importance of Kx channels in rod photoreceptor function.
Site of impulse initiation in a neuron (Moore et al 1983)
Examines the effect of temperature, the taper of the axon hillock, and HH channel density on antidromic spike invasion into the soma and spike initiation under dendritic stimulation.
Sodium currents activate without a delay (Baranauskas and Martina 2006)
Hodgkin and Huxley established that sodium currents in the squid giant axons activate after a delay, which is explained by the model of a channel with three identical independent gates that all have to open before the channel can pass current (the HH model). It is assumed that this model can adequately describe the sodium current activation time course in all mammalian central neurons, although there is no experimental evidence to support such a conjecture. We performed high temporal resolution studies of sodium currents gating in three types of central neurons. ... These results can be explained by a model with two closed states and one open state. ... This model captures all major properties of the sodium current activation. In addition, the proposed model reproduces the observed action potential shape more accurately than the traditional HH model. See paper for more and details.
Spectral method and high-order finite differences for nonlinear cable (Omurtag and Lytton 2010)
We use high-order approximation schemes for the space derivatives in the nonlinear cable equation and investigate the behavior of numerical solution errors by using exact solutions, where available, and grid convergence. The space derivatives are numerically approximated by means of differentiation matrices. A flexible form for the injected current is used that can be adjusted smoothly from a very broad to a narrow peak, which leads, for the passive cable, to a simple, exact solution. We provide comparisons with exact solutions in an unbranched passive cable, the convergence of solutions with progressive refinement of the grid in an active cable, and the simulation of spike initiation in a biophysically realistic single-neuron model.
Spike Initiation in Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons (Mainen et al 1995)
This model reproduces figure 3A from the paper Mainen ZF, Joerges J, Huguenard JR, Sejnowski TJ (1995). Please see the paper for detail whose full text is available at http://www.cnl.salk.edu/~zach/methods.html Email Zach Mainen for questions: mainen@cshl.org
Spike propagation and bouton activation in terminal arborizations (Luscher, Shiner 1990)
Action potential propagation in axons with bifurcations involving short collaterals with synaptic boutons has been simulated ... The architecture of the terminal arborizations has a profound effect on the activation pattern of synapses, suggesting that terminal arborizations not only distribute neural information to postsynaptic cells but may also be able to process neural information presynaptically. Please see paper for details.
Spike Response Model simulator (Jolivet et al. 2004, 2006, 2008)
The Spike Response Model (SRM) optimized on the experimental data in the Single-Neuron modelling Competition ( www.incf.org/community/competitions ) for edition 2007 and edition 2008. The Spike Response Model is a simplified model of neuronal excitability where current linearly integrates to an artificial threshold. After the spike, the threshold is augmented and the voltage follows a voltage kernel that is the average voltage trace during and after a spike. The parameters were chosen to best fit the observed spike times with a method outlined in Jolivet et al. (2006).
Spiking GridPlaceMap model (Pilly & Grossberg, PLoS One, 2013)
Development of spiking grid cells and place cells in the entorhinal-hippocampal system to represent positions in large spaces
Spontaneous firing caused by stochastic channel gating (Chow, White 1996)
NEURON implementation of model of stochastic channel gating, resulting in spontaneous firing. Qualitatively reproduces the phenomena described in the reference.
State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost (Hallermann et al., 2012)
With this model of a layer 5 pyramidal neuron the state and location dependence of the ATP usage and the metabolic efficiency of action potentials can be analyzed. Model parameters were constrained by direct subcellular recordings at dendritic, somatic and axonal compartments.
Stochastic ion channels and neuronal morphology (Cannon et al. 2010)
"... We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. ..." The code is downloadable and more information is available at http://www.psics.org/
Stochastic versions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations (Goldwyn, Shea-Brown 2011)
A Matlab gui for simulating different channel noise models using the Hodgkin-Huxley equations. Methods provided and reviewed in Goldwyn and Shea-Brown (2011) are: current noise, subunit noise, conductance noise, and Markov chain, as well as the standard deterministic Hodgkin-Huxley model.
Stochastic versions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations (Goldwyn, Shea-Brown 2011) (pylab)
A pylab version from Alan Leggitt for simulating different channel noise models using the Hodgkin-Huxley equations. Methods provided and reviewed in Goldwyn and Shea-Brown (2011) are: current noise, subunit noise, conductance noise, and Markov chain, as well as the standard deterministic Hodgkin-Huxley model.
Striatal Output Neuron (Mahon, Deniau, Charpier, Delord 2000)
Striatal output neurons (SONs) integrate glutamatergic synaptic inputs originating from the cerebral cortex. In vivo electrophysiological data have shown that a prior depolarization of SONs induced a short-term (1 sec)increase in their membrane excitability, which facilitated the ability of corticostriatal synaptic potentials to induce firing. Here we propose, using a computational model of SONs, that the use-dependent, short-term increase in the responsiveness of SONs mainly results from the slow kinetics of a voltage-dependent, slowly inactivating potassium A-current. This mechanism confers on SONs a form of intrinsic short-term memory that optimizes the synaptic input–output relationship as a function of their past activation.
Superior paraolivary nucleus neuron (Kopp-Scheinpflug et al. 2011)
This is a model of neurons in the brainstem superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN), which produce very salient offset firing during sound stimulation. Rebound offset firing is triggered by IPSPs coming from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). This model shows that AP firing can emerge from inhibition through integration of large IPSPs, driven by an extremely negative chloride reversal potential, combined with a large hyperpolarization- activated non-specific cationic current (IH), with a secondary contribution from a T-type calcium conductance (ITCa). As a result, tiny gaps in sound stimuli of just 3-4ms can elicit reliable APs that signal such brief offsets.
Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay (Vladimirov et al. 2013)
The computational model of in vivo sharp-wave ripples with place cell replay. Excitatory post-synaptic potentials at dendrites gate antidromic spikes arriving from the axonal collateral, and thus determine when the soma and the main axon fire. The model allows synchronous replay of pyramidal cells during sharp-wave ripple event, and the replay is possible in both forward and reverse directions.
Synaptic integration in a model of granule cells (Gabbiani et al 1994)
We have developed a compartmental model of a turtle cerebellar granule cell consisting of 13 compartments that represent the soma and 4 dendrites. We used this model to investigate the synaptic integration of mossy fiber inputs in granule cells. See reference or abstract at PubMed link below for more information.
Thalamic reticular neurons: the role of Ca currents (Destexhe et al 1996)
The experiments and modeling reported in this paper show how intrinsic bursting properties of RE cells may be explained by dendritic calcium currents.
Tonic neuron in spinal lamina I: prolongation of subthreshold depol. (Prescott and De Koninck 2005)
Model demonstrates mechanism whereby two kinetically distinct inward currents act synergistically to prolong subthreshold depolarization. The important currents are a persistent Na current (with fast kinetics) and a persistent Ca current (with slower kinetics). Model also includes a slow K current and transient Ca current, in addition to standard HH currents. Model parameters are set to values used in Fig. 8A. Simulation shows prolonged depolarizations in response to two brief stimuli.


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