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Models that contain the Model Topic : Spatio-temporal Activity Patterns

(This refers to spiking activity in neuronal networks that either look like parallel waves or irregularly shaped spreading and/or diminishing areas.)

   Models   Description
A dynamical model of the basal ganglia (Leblois et al 2006)
We propose a new model for the function and dysfunction of the basal ganglia (BG). The basal ganglia are a set of cerebral structures involved in motor control which dysfunction causes high-incidence pathologies such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Their precise motor functions remain unknown. The classical model of the BG that allowed for the discovery of new treatments for PD seems today outdated in several respects. Based on experimental observations, our model proposes a simple dynamical framework for the understanding of how BG may select motor programs to be executed. Moreover, we explain how this ability is lost and how tremor-related oscillations in neuronal activity may emerge in PD.
A Fast Rhythmic Bursting Cell: in vivo cell modeling (Lee 2007)
One of the cellular mechanisms underlying the generation of gamma oscillations is a type of cortical pyramidal neuron named fast rhythmic bursting (FRB) cells. After cells from cats' primary visual cortices were filled with Neurobiotin, the brains were cut, and the cells were photographed. One FRB cell was chosen to be confocaled, reconstructed with Neurolucida software, and generated a detailed multi-compartmental model in the NEURON program. We explore firing properties of FRB cells and the role of enhanced Na+ conductance.
A microcircuit model of the frontal eye fields (Heinzle et al. 2007)
" ... we show that the canonical circuit (Douglas et al. 1989, Douglas and Martin 1991) can, with a few modifications, model the primate FEF. The spike-based network of integrate-and-fire neurons was tested in tasks that were used in electrophysiological experiments in behaving macaque monkeys. The dynamics of the model matched those of neurons observed in the FEF, and the behavioral results matched those observed in psychophysical experiments. The close relationship between the model and the cortical architecture allows a detailed comparison of the simulation results with physiological data and predicts details of the anatomical circuit of the FEF."
A spiking model of cortical broadcast and competition (Shanahan 2008)
"This paper presents a computer model of cortical broadcast and competition based on spiking neurons and inspired by the hypothesis of a global neuronal workspace underlying conscious information processing in the human brain. In the model, the hypothesised workspace is realised by a collection of recurrently interconnected regions capable of sustaining and disseminating a reverberating spatial pattern of activation. ..."
A theory of ongoing activity in V1 (Goldberg et al 2004)
Ongoing spontaneous activity in the cerebral cortex exhibits complex spatiotemporal patterns in the absence of sensory stimuli. To elucidate the nature of this ongoing activity, we present a theoretical treatment of two contrasting scenarios of cortical dynamics: (1) fluctuations about a single background state and (2) wandering among multiple “attractor” states, which encode a single or several stimulus features. Studying simplified network rate models of the primary visual cortex (V1), we show that the single state scenario is characterized by fast and high-dimensional Gaussian-like fluctuations, whereas in the multiple state scenario the fluctuations are slow, low dimensional, and highly non-Gaussian. Studying a more realistic model that incorporates correlations in the feedforward input, spatially restricted cortical interactions, and an experimentally derived layout of pinwheels, we show that recent optical-imaging data of ongoing activity in V1 are consistent with the presence of either a single background state or multiple attractor states encoding many features.
An oscillatory neural model of multiple object tracking (Kazanovich and Borisyuk 2006)
An oscillatory neural network model of multiple object tracking is described. The model works with a set of identical visual objects moving around the screen. At the initial stage, the model selects into the focus of attention a subset of objects initially marked as targets. Other objects are used as distractors. The model aims to preserve the initial separation between targets and distractors while objects are moving. This is achieved by a proper interplay of synchronizing and desynchronizing interactions in a multilayer network, where each layer is responsible for tracking a single target. The results of the model simulation are presented and compared with experimental data. In agreement with experimental evidence, simulations with a larger number of targets have shown higher error rates. Also, the functioning of the model in the case of temporarily overlapping objects is presented.
Asynchronous irregular and up/down states in excitatory and inhibitory NNs (Destexhe 2009)
"Randomly-connected networks of integrate-and-fire (IF) neurons are known to display asynchronous irregular (AI) activity states, which resemble the discharge activity recorded in the cerebral cortex of awake animals. ... Here, we investigate the occurrence of AI states in networks of nonlinear IF neurons, such as the adaptive exponential IF (Brette-Gerstner-Izhikevich) model. This model can display intrinsic properties such as low-threshold spike (LTS), regular spiking (RS) or fast-spiking (FS). We successively investigate the oscillatory and AI dynamics of thalamic, cortical and thalamocortical networks using such models. ..."
Broadening of activity with flow across neural structures (Lytton et al. 2008)
"Synfire chains have long been suggested as a substrate for perception and information processing in the nervous system. However, embedding activation chains in a densely connected nervous matrix risks spread of signal that will obscure or obliterate the message. We used computer modeling and physiological measurements in rat hippocampus to assess this problem of activity broadening. We simulated a series of neural modules with feedforward propagation and random connectivity within each module and from one module to the next. ..."
CA1 pyramidal neurons: binding properties and the magical number 7 (Migliore et al. 2008)
NEURON files from the paper: Single neuron binding properties and the magical number 7, by M. Migliore, G. Novara, D. Tegolo, Hippocampus, in press (2008). In an extensive series of simulations with realistic morphologies and active properties, we demonstrate how n radial (oblique) dendrites of these neurons may be used to bind n inputs to generate an output signal. The results suggest a possible neural code as the most effective n-ple of dendrites that can be used for short-term memory recollection of persons, objects, or places. Our analysis predicts a straightforward physiological explanation for the observed puzzling limit of about 7 short-term memory items that can be stored by humans.
CellExcite: an efficient simulation environment for excitable cells (Bartocci et al. 2008)
"We have developed CellExcite, a sophisticated simulation environment for excitable-cell networks. CellExcite allows the user to sketch a tissue of excitable cells, plan the stimuli to be applied during simulation, and customize the diffusion model. CellExcite adopts Hybrid Automata (HA) as the computational model in order to efficiently capture both discrete and continuous excitable-cell behavior."
Cerebellar gain and timing control model (Yamazaki & Tanaka 2007)(Yamazaki & Nagao 2012)
This paper proposes a hypothetical computational mechanism for unified gain and timing control in the cerebellum. The hypothesis is justified by computer simulations of a large-scale spiking network model of the cerebellum.
Competition for AP initiation sites in a circuit controlling simple learning (Cruz et al. 2007)
"The spatial and temporal patterns of action potential initiations were studied in a behaving leech preparation to determine the basis of increased firing that accompanies sensitization, a form of non-associative learning requiring the S-interneurons. ... The S-interneurons, one in each ganglion and linked by electrical synapses with both neighbors to form a chain, are interposed between sensory and motor neurons. ... the single site with the largest initiation rate, the S-cell in the stimulated segment, suppressed initiations in adjacent ganglia. Experiments showed this was both because (1) it received the earliest, greatest input and (2) the delayed synaptic input to the adjacent S-cells coincided with the action potential refractory period. A compartmental model of the S-cell and its inputs showed that a simple, intrinsic mechanism of inexcitability after each action potential may account for suppression of impulse initiations. Thus, a non-synaptic competition between neurons alters synaptic integration in the chain. In one mode, inputs to different sites sum independently, whereas in another, synaptic input to a single site precisely specifies the overall pattern of activity."
Dendritic Discrimination of Temporal Input Sequences (Branco et al. 2010)
Compartmental model of a layer 2/3 pyramidal cell in the rat somatosensory cortex, exploring NMDA-dependent sensitivity to the temporal sequence of synaptic activation.
Dentate Gyrus Feed-forward inhibition (Ferrante et al. 2009)
In this paper, the model was used to show how that FFI can change a steeply sigmoidal input-output (I/O) curve into a double-sigmoid typical of buffer systems.
Dentate gyrus network model (Santhakumar et al 2005)
Mossy cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting are two characteristic consequences of repeated seizures and head trauma. However, their precise contributions to the hyperexcitable state are not well understood. Because it is difficult, and frequently impossible, to independently examine using experimental techniques whether it is the loss of mossy cells or the sprouting of mossy fibers that leads to dentate hyperexcitability, we built a biophysically realistic and anatomically representative computational model of the dentate gyrus to examine this question. The 527-cell model, containing granule, mossy, basket, and hilar cells with axonal projections to the perforant-path termination zone, showed that even weak mossy fiber sprouting (10-15% of the strong sprouting observed in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy) resulted in the spread of seizure-like activity to the adjacent model hippocampal laminae after focal stimulation of the perforant path. See reference for more and details.
Excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites (Behabadi et al. 2012)
" ... We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. ..."
Feedforward heteroassociative network with HH dynamics (Lytton 1998)
Using the original McCulloch-Pitts notion of simple on and off spike coding in lieu of rate coding, an Anderson-Kohonen artificial neural network (ANN) associative memory model was ported to a neuronal network with Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics.
Formation of synfire chains (Jun and Jin 2007)
"Temporally precise sequences of neuronal spikes that span hundreds of milliseconds are observed in many brain areas, including songbird premotor nucleus, cat visual cortex, and primary motor cortex. Synfire chains—networks in which groups of neurons are connected via excitatory synapses into a unidirectional chain—are thought to underlie the generation of such sequences. It is unknown, however, how synfire chains can form in local neural circuits, especially for long chains. Here, we show through computer simulation that long synfire chains can develop through spike-time dependent synaptic plasticity and axon remodeling—the pruning of prolific weak connections that follows the emergence of a finite number of strong connections. ..."
Gap-junction coupled network activity depends on coupled dendrites diameter (Gansert et al. 2007)
"... We have previously shown that the amplitude of electrical signals propagating across gap-junctionally coupled passive cables is maximized at a unique diameter. This suggests that threshold-dependent signals may propagate through gap junctions for a finite range of diameters around this optimal value. Here we examine the diameter dependence of action potential propagation across model networks of dendro-dendritically coupled neurons. The neurons in these models have passive soma and dendrites and an action potential-generating axon. We show that propagation of action potentials across gap junctions occurs only over a finite range of dendritic diameters and that propagation delay depends on this diameter. ...". See paper for more and details.
Gating of steering signals through phasic modulation of reticulospinal neurons (Kozlov et al. 2014)
" ... We use the lamprey as a model for investigating the role of this phasic modulation of the reticulospinal activity, because the brainstem–spinal cord networks are known down to the cellular level in this phylogenetically oldest extant vertebrate. We describe how the phasic modulation of reticulospinal activity from the spinal CPG ensures reliable steering/turning commands without the need for a very precise timing of on- or offset, by using a biophysically detailed large-scale (19,600 model neurons and 646,800 synapses) computational model of the lamprey brainstem–spinal cord network. To verify that the simulated neural network can control body movements, including turning, the spinal activity is fed to a mechanical model of lamprey swimming. ..."
Hippocampus temporo-septal engram shift model (Lytton 1999)
Temporo-septal engram shift model of hippocampal memory. The model posits that memories gradually move along the hippocampus from a temporal encoding site to ever more septal sites from which they are recalled. We propose that the sense of time is encoded by the location of the engram along the temporo-septal axis.
Impact of dendritic size and topology on pyramidal cell burst firing (van Elburg and van Ooyen 2010)
The code provided here was written to systematically investigate which of the physical parameters controlled by dendritic morphology underlies the differences in spiking behaviour observed in different realizations of the 'ping-pong'-model. Structurally varying dendritic topology and length in a simplified model allows us to separate out the physical parameters derived from morphology underlying burst firing.

To perform the parameter scans we created a new NEURON tool the MultipleRunControl which can be used to easily set up a parameter scan and write the simulation results to file.

Using this code we found that not input conductance but the arrival time of the return current, as measured provisionally by the average electrotonic path length, determines whether the pyramidal cell (with ping-pong model dynamics) will burst or fire single spikes.
Large cortex model with map-based neurons (Rulkov et al 2004)
We develop a new computationally efficient approach for the analysis of complex large-scale neurobiological networks. Its key element is the use of a new phenomenological model of a neuron capable of replicating important spike pattern characteristics and designed in the form of a system of difference equations (a map). ... Interconnected with synaptic currents these model neurons demonstrated responses very similar to those found with Hodgkin-Huxley models and in experiments. We illustrate the efficacy of this approach in simulations of one- and two-dimensional cortical network models consisting of regular spiking neurons and fast spiking interneurons to model sleep and activated states of the thalamocortical system. See paper for more.
Leech heart interneuron network model (Hill et al 2001, 2002)
We have created a computational model of the timing network that paces the heartbeat of the medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis. In the intact nerve cord, segmental oscillators are mutually entrained to the same cycle period. Although experiments have shown that the segmental oscillators are coupled by inhibitory coordinating interneurons, the underlying mechanisms of intersegmental coordination have not yet been elucidated. To help understand this coordination, we have created a simple computational model with two variants: symmetric and asymmetric. See references for more details. Biologically realistic network models with two, six, and eight cells and a tutorial are available at the links to Calabrese's web site below.
Leech Mechanosensory Neurons: Synaptic Facilitation by Reflected APs (Baccus 1998)
This model by Stephen Baccus explores the phenomena of action potential (AP) propagation at branch boints in axons. APs are sometimes transmitted down the efferent processes and sometimes are reflected back to the axon of AP origin or neither. See the paper for details. The model zip file contains a readme.txt which list introductory steps to follow to run the simulation. Stephen Baccus's email address: baccus@fas.harvard.edu
Modular grid cell responses as a basis for hippocampal remapping (Monaco and Abbott 2011)
"Hippocampal place fields, the local regions of activity recorded from place cells in exploring rodents, can undergo large changes in relative location during remapping. This process would appear to require some form of modulated global input. Grid-cell responses recorded from layer II of medial entorhinal cortex in rats have been observed to realign concurrently with hippocampal remapping, making them a candidate input source. However, this realignment occurs coherently across colocalized ensembles of grid cells (Fyhn et al., 2007). The hypothesized entorhinal contribution to remapping depends on whether this coherence extends to all grid cells, which is currently unknown. We study whether dividing grid cells into small numbers of independently realigning modules can both account for this localized coherence and allow for hippocampal remapping. ..."
Motion Clouds: Synthesis of random textures for motion perception (Leon et al. 2012)
We describe a framework to generate random texture movies with controlled information content. In particular, these stimuli can be made closer to naturalistic textures compared to usual stimuli such as gratings and random-dot kinetograms. We simplified the definition to parametrically define these "Motion Clouds" around the most prevalent feature axis (mean and bandwith): direction, spatial frequency, orientation.
Neural modeling of an internal clock (Yamazaki and Tanaka 2008)
"We studied a simple random recurrent inhibitory network. Despite its simplicity, the dynamics was so rich that activity patterns of neurons evolved with time without recurrence due to random recurrent connections among neurons. The sequence of activity patterns was generated by the trigger of an external signal, and the generation was stable against noise.... Therefore, a time passage from the trigger of an external signal could be represented by the sequence of activity patterns, suggesting that this model could work as an internal clock. ..."
Olfactory Bulb Network (Davison et al 2003)
A biologically-detailed model of the mammalian olfactory bulb, incorporating the mitral and granule cells and the dendrodendritic synapses between them. The results of simulation experiments with electrical stimulation agree closely in most details with published experimental data. The model predicts that the time course of dendrodendritic inhibition is dependent on the network connectivity as well as on the intrinsic parameters of the synapses. In response to simulated odor stimulation, strongly activated mitral cells tend to suppress neighboring cells, the mitral cells readily synchronize their firing, and increasing the stimulus intensity increases the degree of synchronization. For more details, see the reference below.
Oscillation and coding in a proposed NN model of insect olfaction (Horcholle-Bossavit et al. 2007)
"For the analysis of coding mechanisms in the insect olfactory system, a fully connected network of synchronously updated McCulloch and Pitts neurons (MC-P type) was (previously) developed. ... Considering the update time as an intrinsic clock, this “Dynamic Neural Filter” (DNF), which maps regions of input space into spatio-temporal sequences of neuronal activity, is able to produce exact binary codes extracted from the synchronized activities recorded at the level of projection neurons (PN) in the locust antennal lobe (AL) in response to different odors ... We find synaptic matrices which lead to both the emergence of robust oscillations and spatio-temporal patterns, using a formal criterion, based on a Normalized Euclidian Distance (NED), in order to measure the use of the temporal dimension as a coding dimension by the DNF. Similarly to biological PN, the activity of excitatory neurons in the model can be both phase-locked to different cycles of oscillations which (is reminiscent of the) local field potential (LFP), and nevertheless exhibit dynamic behavior complex enough to be the basis of spatio-temporal codes."
Oscillations, phase-of-firing coding and STDP: an efficient learning scheme (Masquelier et al. 2009)
The model demonstrates how a common oscillatory drive for a group of neurons formats and reliabilizes their spike times - through an activation-to-phase conversion - so that repeating activation patterns can be easily detected and learned by a downstream neuron equipped with STDP, and then recognized in just one oscillation cycle.
Phase oscillator models for lamprey central pattern generators (Varkonyi et al. 2008)
In our paper, Varkonyi et al. 2008, we derive phase oscillator models for the lamprey central pattern generator from two biophysically based segmental models. We study intersegmental coordination and show how these models can provide stable intersegmental phase lags observed in real animals.
Polychronization: Computation With Spikes (Izhikevich 2005)
"We present a minimal spiking network that can polychronize, that is, exhibit reproducible time-locked but not synchronous firing patterns with millisecond precision, as in synfire braids. The network consists of cortical spiking neurons with axonal conduction delays and spiketiming- dependent plasticity (STDP); a ready-to-use MATLAB code is included. It exhibits sleeplike oscillations, gamma (40 Hz) rhythms, conversion of firing rates to spike timings, and other interesting regimes. ... To our surprise, the number of coexisting polychronous groups far exceeds the number of neurons in the network, resulting in an unprecedented memory capacity of the system. ..."
Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.
Reward modulated STDP (Legenstein et al. 2008)
"... This article provides tools for an analytic treatment of reward-modulated STDP, which allows us to predict under which conditions reward-modulated STDP will achieve a desired learning effect. These analytical results imply that neurons can learn through reward-modulated STDP to classify not only spatial but also temporal firing patterns of presynaptic neurons. They also can learn to respond to specific presynaptic firing patterns with particular spike patterns. Finally, the resulting learning theory predicts that even difficult credit-assignment problems, where it is very hard to tell which synaptic weights should be modified in order to increase the global reward for the system, can be solved in a self-organizing manner through reward-modulated STDP. This yields an explanation for a fundamental experimental result on biofeedback in monkeys by Fetz and Baker. In this experiment monkeys were rewarded for increasing the firing rate of a particular neuron in the cortex and were able to solve this extremely difficult credit assignment problem. ... In addition our model demonstrates that reward-modulated STDP can be applied to all synapses in a large recurrent neural network without endangering the stability of the network dynamics."
Robust Reservoir Generation by Correlation-Based Learning (Yamazaki & Tanaka 2008)
"Reservoir computing (RC) is a new framework for neural computation. A reservoir is usually a recurrent neural network with fixed random connections. In this article, we propose an RC model in which the connections in the reservoir are modifiable. ... We apply our RC model to trace eyeblink conditioning. The reservoir bridged the gap of an interstimulus interval between the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli, and a readout neuron was able to learn and express the timed conditioned response."
Scaling self-organizing maps to model large cortical networks (Bednar et al 2004)
Self-organizing computational models with specific intracortical connections can explain many functional features of visual cortex, such as topographic orientation and ocular dominance maps. ... This article introduces two techniques that make large simulations practical. First, we show how parameter scaling equations can be derived for laterally connected self-organizing models. These equations result in quantitatively equivalent maps over a wide range of simulation sizes, making it possible to debug small simulations and then scale them up only when needed. ... Second, we use parameter scaling to implement a new growing map method called GLISSOM, which dramatically reduces the memory and computational requirements of large self-organizing networks. See paper for more and details.
Sensory feedback in an oscillatory interference model of place cell activity (Monaco et al. 2011)
Many animals use a form of dead reckoning known as 'path integration' to maintain a sense of their location as they explore the world. However, internal motion signals and the neural activity that integrates them can be noisy, leading inevitably to inaccurate position estimates. The rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex support a flexible system of spatial representation that is critical to spatial learning and memory. The position signal encoded by this system is thought to rely on path integration, but it must be recalibrated by familiar landmarks to maintain accuracy. To explore the interaction between path integration and external landmarks, we present a model of hippocampal activity based on the interference of theta-frequency oscillations that are modulated by realistic animal movements around a track. We show that spatial activity degrades with noise, but introducing external cues based on direct sensory feedback can prevent this degradation. When these cues are put into conflict with each other, their interaction produces a diverse array of response changes that resembles experimental observations. Feedback driven by attending to landmarks may be critical to navigation and spatial memory in mammals.
Sleep-wake transitions in corticothalamic system (Bazhenov et al 2002)
The authors investigate the transition between sleep and awake states with intracellular recordings in cats and computational models. The model describes many essential features of slow wave sleep and activated states as well as the transition between them.
Slow wave propagation in the guinea-pig gastric antrum (Hirst et al. 2006, Edwards and Hirst 2006)
"(Edwards and Hirst 2006) provides an electrical description of the propagation of slow waves and pacemaker potentials in the guinea-pig gastric antrum in anal and circumferential directions. As electrical conduction between laterally adjacent circular muscle bundles is regularly interrupted, anal conduction of pacemaker potentials was assumed to occur via an electrically interconnected chain of myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCMY). ICCMY were also connected resistively to serially connected compartments of longitudinal muscle. Circumferential conduction occurred in a circular smooth muscle bundle that was represented as a chain of electrically connected isopotential compartments: each compartment contained a proportion of intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCIM) that are responsible for the regenerative component of the slow wave. The circular muscle layer, which contains ICCIM, and the ICCMY network incorporated a mechanism, modelled as a two-stage chemical reaction, which produces an intracellular messenger. ... The model generates pacemaker potentials and slow waves with propagation velocities similar to those determined in the physiological experiments described in the accompanying paper."
Small world networks of Type I and Type II Excitable Neurons (Bogaard et al. 2009)
Implemented with NEURON 5.9, four model neurons with varying excitability properties affect the spatiotemporal patterning of small world networks of homogeneous and heterogeneous cell population.
Sparsely connected networks of spiking neurons (Brunel 2000)
The dynamics of networks of sparsely connected excitatory and inhibitory integrate-and-fire neurons are studied analytically (and with simulations). The analysis reveals a rich repertoire of states, including synchronous states in which neurons fire regularly; asynchronous states with stationary global activity and very irregular individual cell activity; and states in which the global activity oscillates but individual cells fire irregularly, typically at rates lower than the global oscillation frequency. See paper for more and details.
STDP allows fast rate-modulated coding with Poisson-like spike trains (Gilson et al. 2011)
The model demonstrates that a neuron equipped with STDP robustly detects repeating rate patterns among its afferents, from which the spikes are generated on the fly using inhomogenous Poisson sampling, provided those rates have narrow temporal peaks (10-20ms) - a condition met by many experimental Post-Stimulus Time Histograms (PSTH).
Strategy for kinase transport by microtubules to nerve terminals (Koon et al. 2014)
This model was used in the computational study of the strategies of protein transport in the context of JNK (c-JUN NH2-terminal kinase) transport along microtubules to the terminals of neuronal cells. Diffusion governs the first strategy. In the second strategy, proteins of the JNK signaling cascade bind to scaffolds and the whole protein-scaffold cargo is transported by kinesin motors along microtubules. Using the results from the simulations, the two distinct strategies for transport were compared.
Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, dopamine-modulated cell assemblies (Humphries et al. 2009)
To begin identifying potential dynamically-defined computational elements within the striatum, we constructed a new three-dimensional model of the striatal microcircuit's connectivity, and instantiated this with our dopamine-modulated neuron models of the MSNs and FSIs. A new model of gap junctions between the FSIs was introduced and tuned to experimental data. We introduced a novel multiple spike-train analysis method, and apply this to the outputs of the model to find groups of synchronised neurons at multiple time-scales. We found that, with realistic in vivo background input, small assemblies of synchronised MSNs spontaneously appeared, consistent with experimental observations, and that the number of assemblies and the time-scale of synchronisation was strongly dependent on the simulated concentration of dopamine. We also showed that feed-forward inhibition from the FSIs counter-intuitively increases the firing rate of the MSNs.
Striatal GABAergic microcircuit, spatial scales of dynamics (Humphries et al, 2010)
The main thrust of this paper was the development of the 3D anatomical network of the striatum's GABAergic microcircuit. We grew dendrite and axon models for the MSNs and FSIs and extracted probabilities for the presence of these neurites as a function of distance from the soma. From these, we found the probabilities of intersection between the neurites of two neurons given their inter-somatic distance, and used these to construct three-dimensional striatal networks. These networks were examined for their predictions for the distributions of the numbers and distances of connections for all the connections in the microcircuit. We then combined the neuron models from a previous model (Humphries et al, 2009; ModelDB ID: 128874) with the new anatomical model. We used this new complete striatal model to examine the impact of the anatomical network on the firing properties of the MSN and FSI populations, and to study the influence of all the inputs to one MSN within the network.
Thalamocortical and Thalamic Reticular Network (Destexhe et al 1996)
NEURON model of oscillations in networks of thalamocortical and thalamic reticular neurons in the ferret. (more applications for a model quantitatively identical to previous DLGN model; updated for NEURON v4 and above)
Towards a virtual C. elegans (Palyanov et al. 2012)
"... Here we present a detailed demonstration of a virtual C. elegans aimed at integrating these data in the form of a 3D dynamic model operating in a simulated physical environment. Our current demonstration includes a realistic flexible worm body model, muscular system and a partially implemented ventral neural cord. Our virtual C. elegans demonstrates successful forward and backward locomotion when sending sinusoidal patterns of neuronal activity to groups of motor neurons. ..."
Turtle visual cortex model (Nenadic et al. 2003, Wang et al. 2005, Wang et al. 2006)
This is a model of the visual cortex of freshwater turtles that is based upon the known anatomy and physiology of individual neurons. The model was published in three papers (Nenadic et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2005; Wang et al., 2006), which should be consulted for full details on its construction. The model has also been used in several papers (Robbins and Senseman, 2004; Du et al., 2005; Du et al., 2006). It is implemented in GENESIS (Bower and Beeman, 1998).
Visual Cortex Neurons: Dendritic computations (Archie, Mel 2000)
Neuron and C program files from Archie, K.A. and Mel, B.W. A model of intradendritic computation of binocular disparity. Nature Neuroscience 3:54-63, 2000 The original files for this model are located at the web site


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