Models that contain the Model Concept : Parameter sensitivity

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    Models   Description
1.  Axon growth model (Diehl et al. 2016)
The model describes the elongation over time of an axon from a small neurite to its steady-state length. The elongation depends on the availability of tubulin dimers in the growth cone. The dimers are produced in the soma and then transported along the axon to the growth cone. Mathematically the model consists of a partial differential equation coupled with two nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The code implements a spatial scaling to deal with the growing (and shrinking) domain and a temporal scaling to deal with evolutions on different time scales. Further, the numerical scheme is chosen to fully utilize the structure of the problems. To summarize, this results in fast and reliable axon growth simulations.
2.  Cell signaling/ion channel variability effects on neuronal response (Anderson, Makadia, et al. 2015)
" ... We evaluated the impact of molecular variability in the expression of cell signaling components and ion channels on electrophysiological excitability and neuromodulation. We employed a computational approach that integrated neuropeptide receptor-mediated signaling with electrophysiology. We simulated a population of neurons in which expression levels of a neuropeptide receptor and multiple ion channels were simultaneously varied within a physiological range. We analyzed the effects of variation on the electrophysiological response to a neuropeptide stimulus. ..."
3.  Control of oscillations and spontaneous firing in dopamine neurons (Rumbell & Kozloski 2019)
Model of Substantia Nigra pars Compacta Dopamine Neuron. 'Toy' morphology with 4 dendrites, one of which is the axon-bearing dendrite, with an axon branching from it. The axon is a short 'axon initial segment' compartment, followed by a longer 'axon'. 727 parameter sets for ion channel conductance and kinetic parameters were found using evolutionary optimization, all of which are viable candidates representing a plausible model of a SNc DA.
4.  Data-driven, HH-type model of the lateral pyloric (LP) cell in the STG (Nowotny et al. 2008)
This model was developed using voltage clamp data and existing LP models to assemble an initial set of currents which were then adjusted by extensive fitting to a long data set of an isolated LP neuron. The main points of the work are a) automatic fitting is difficult but works when the method is carefully adjusted to the problem (and the initial guess is good enough). b) The resulting model (in this case) made reasonable predictions for manipulations not included in the original data set, e.g., blocking some of the ionic currents. c) The model is reasonably robust against changes in parameters but the different parameters vary a lot in this respect. d) The model is suitable for use in a network and has been used for this purpose (Ivanchenko et al. 2008)
5.  Endocannabinoid dynamics gate spike-timing dependent depression and potentiation (Cui et al 2016)
The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is considered involved in synaptic depression. Recent reports have also linked eCBs to synaptic potentiation. However it is not known how eCB signaling may support such bidirectionality. To question the mechanisms of this phenomena in spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at corticostriatal synapses, we combined electrophysiology experiments with biophysical modeling. We demonstrate that STDP is controlled by eCB levels and dynamics: prolonged and moderate levels of eCB lead to eCB-mediated long-term depression (eCB-tLTD) while short and large eCB transients produce eCB-mediated long-term potentiation (eCB-tLTP). Therefore, just like neurotransmitters glutamate or GABA, eCB form a bidirectional system.
6.  Leech Heart (HE) Motor Neuron conductances contributions to NN activity (Lamb & Calabrese 2013)
"... To explore the relationship between conductances, and in particular how they influence the activity of motor neurons in the well characterized leech heartbeat system, we developed a new multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley style leech heart motor neuron model. To do so, we evolved a population of model instances, which differed in the density of specific conductances, capable of achieving specific output activity targets given an associated input pattern. ... We found that the strengths of many conductances, including those with differing dynamics, had strong partial correlations and that these relationships appeared to be linked by their influence on heart motor neuron activity. Conductances that had positive correlations opposed one another and had the opposite effects on activity metrics when perturbed whereas conductances that had negative correlations could compensate for one another and had similar effects on activity metrics. "
7.  Nodose sensory neuron (Schild et al. 1994, Schild and Kunze 1997)
This is a simulink implementation of the model described in Schild et al. 1994, and Schild and Kunze 1997 papers on Nodose sensory neurons. These papers describe the sensitivity these models have to their parameters and the match of the models to experimental data.
8.  Optical stimulation of a channelrhodopsin-2 positive pyramidal neuron model (Foutz et al 2012)
A computational tool to explore the underlying principles of optogenetic neural stimulation. This "light-neuron" model consists of theoretical representations of the light dynamics generated by a fiber optic in brain tissue, coupled to a multicompartment cable model of a cortical pyramidal neuron (Hu et al. 2009, ModelDB #123897) embedded with channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) membrane dynamics. Simulations predict that the activation threshold is sensitive to many of the properties of ChR2 (density, conductivity, and kinetics), tissue medium (scattering and absorbance), and the fiber-optic light source (diameter and numerical aperture). This model system represents a scientific instrument to characterize the effects of optogenetic neuromodulation, as well as an engineering design tool to help guide future development of optogenetic technology.
9.  Origin of heterogeneous spiking patterns in spinal dorsal horn neurons (Balachandar & Prescott 2018)
"Neurons are often classified by spiking pattern. Yet, some neurons exhibit distinct patterns under subtly different test conditions, which suggests that they operate near an abrupt transition, or bifurcation. A set of such neurons may exhibit heterogeneous spiking patterns not because of qualitative differences in which ion channels they express, but rather because quantitative differences in expression levels cause neurons to operate on opposite sides of a bifurcation. Neurons in the spinal dorsal horn, for example, respond to somatic current injection with patterns that include tonic, single, gap, delayed and reluctant spiking. It is unclear whether these patterns reflect five cell populations (defined by distinct ion channel expression patterns), heterogeneity within a single population, or some combination thereof. We reproduced all five spiking patterns in a computational model by varying the densities of a low-threshold (KV1-type) potassium conductance and an inactivating (A-type) potassium conductance and found that single, gap, delayed and reluctant spiking arise when the joint probability distribution of those channel densities spans two intersecting bifurcations that divide the parameter space into quadrants, each associated with a different spiking pattern. ... "
10.  Parameter estimation for Hodgkin-Huxley based models of cortical neurons (Lepora et al. 2011)
Simulation and fitting of two-compartment (active soma, passive dendrite) for different classes of cortical neurons. The fitting technique indirectly matches neuronal currents derived from somatic membrane potential data rather than fitting the voltage traces directly. The method uses an analytic solution for the somatic ion channel maximal conductances given approximate models of the channel kinetics, membrane dynamics and dendrite. This approach is tested on model-derived data for various cortical neurons.
11.  Parametric computation and persistent gamma in a cortical model (Chambers et al. 2012)
Using the Traub et al (2005) model of the cortex we determined how 33 synaptic strength parameters control gamma oscillations. We used fractional factorial design to reduce the number of runs required to 4096. We found an expected multiplicative interaction between parameters.
12.  Phase oscillator models for lamprey central pattern generators (Varkonyi et al. 2008)
In our paper, Varkonyi et al. 2008, we derive phase oscillator models for the lamprey central pattern generator from two biophysically based segmental models. We study intersegmental coordination and show how these models can provide stable intersegmental phase lags observed in real animals.
13.  Preserving axosomatic spiking features despite diverse dendritic morphology (Hay et al., 2013)
The authors found that linearly scaling the ion channel conductance densities of a reference model with the conductance load in 28 3D reconstructed layer 5 thick-tufted pyramidal cells was necessary to match the experimental statistics of these cells electrical firing properties.
14.  Sympathetic Preganglionic Neurone (Briant et al. 2014)
A model of a sympathetic preganglionic neurone of muscle vasoconstrictor-type.
15.  Temperature-Dependent Pyloric Pacemaker Kernel (Caplan JS et al., 2014)
"... Here we demonstrate that biophysical models of channel noise can give rise to two kinds of recently discovered stochastic facilitation effects in a Hodgkin-Huxley-like model of auditory brainstem neurons. The first, known as slope-based stochastic resonance (SBSR), enables phasic neurons to emit action potentials that can encode the slope of inputs that vary slowly relative to key time constants in the model. The second, known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR), occurs in tonically firing neurons when small levels of noise inhibit tonic firing and replace it with burstlike dynamics. ... our results show that possible associated computational benefits may occur due to channel noise in neurons of the auditory brainstem. ... "
16.  Thalamocortical relay neuron models constrained by experiment and optimization (Iavarone et al 2019)

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