Models that contain the Implementer : Masquelier, Tim [timothee.masquelier at alum.mit.edu]

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    Models   Description
1.  Microsaccades and synchrony coding in the retina (Masquelier et al. 2016)
We show that microsaccades (MS) enable efficient synchrony-based coding among the primate retinal ganglion cells (RGC). We find that each MS causes certain RGCs to fire synchronously, namely those whose receptive fields contain contrast edges after the MS. The emitted synchronous spike volley thus rapidly transmits the most salient edges of the stimulus. We demonstrate that the readout could be done rapidly by simple coincidence-detector neurons, and that the required connectivity could emerge spontaneously with spike timing-dependent plasticity.
2.  Network bursts in cultured NN result from different adaptive mechanisms (Masquelier & Deco 2013)
It is now well established that cultured neuron networks are spontaneously active, and tend to synchronize. Synchronous events typically involve the whole network, and have thus been termed “network spikes” (NS). Using experimental recordings and numerical simulations, we show here that the inter-NS interval statistics are complex, and allow inferring the neural mechanisms at work, in particular the adaptive ones, and estimating a number of parameters to which we cannot access experimentally.
3.  Optimal Localist and Distributed Coding Through STDP (Masquelier & Kheradpisheh 2018)
We show how a LIF neuron equipped with STDP can become optimally selective, in an unsupervised manner, to one or several repeating spike patterns, even when those patterns are hidden in Poisson spike trains.
4.  Optimal spatiotemporal spike pattern detection by STDP (Masquelier 2017)
We simulate a LIF neuron equipped with STDP. A pattern repeats in its inputs. The LIF progressively becomes selective to the repeating pattern, in an optimal manner.
5.  Oscillations, phase-of-firing coding and STDP: an efficient learning scheme (Masquelier et al. 2009)
The model demonstrates how a common oscillatory drive for a group of neurons formats and reliabilizes their spike times - through an activation-to-phase conversion - so that repeating activation patterns can be easily detected and learned by a downstream neuron equipped with STDP, and then recognized in just one oscillation cycle.
6.  Relative spike time coding and STDP-based orientation selectivity in V1 (Masquelier 2012)
Phenomenological spiking model of the cat early visual system. We show how natural vision can drive spike time correlations on sufficiently fast time scales to lead to the acquisition of orientation-selective V1 neurons through STDP. This is possible without reference times such as stimulus onsets, or saccade landing times. But even when such reference times are available, we demonstrate that the relative spike times encode the images more robustly than the absolute ones.
7.  STDP allows fast rate-modulated coding with Poisson-like spike trains (Gilson et al. 2011)
The model demonstrates that a neuron equipped with STDP robustly detects repeating rate patterns among its afferents, from which the spikes are generated on the fly using inhomogenous Poisson sampling, provided those rates have narrow temporal peaks (10-20ms) - a condition met by many experimental Post-Stimulus Time Histograms (PSTH).

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