Models that contain the Cell : Vestibular neuron

(Used to describe any (medial or otherwise) of the second order (connected to a vestibular hair cell) vestibular neurons.)
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    Models   Description
1.  AP shape and parameter constraints in optimization of compartment models (Weaver and Wearne 2006)
"... We construct an objective function that includes both time-aligned action potential shape error and errors in firing rate and firing regularity. We then implement a variant of simulated annealing that introduces a recentering algorithm to handle infeasible points outside the boundary constraints. We show how our objective function captures essential features of neuronal firing patterns, and why our boundary management technique is superior to previous approaches."
2.  Frog second-order vestibular neuron models (Rossert et al. 2011)
This implements spiking Hodgkin-Huxley type models of tonic and phasic second-order vestibular neurons. Models fitted to intracellular spike and membrane potential recordings from frog (Rana temporaria). The models can be stimulated by intracellular step current, frequency current (ZAP) or synaptic stimulation.
3.  Medial vestibular neuron models (Quadroni and Knopfel 1994)
The structure and the parameters of the model cells were chosen to reproduce the responses of type A and type B MVNns as described in electrophysiological recordings. The emergence of oscillatory firing under these two specific experimental conditions is consistent with electrophysiological recordings not used during construction of the model. We, therefore, suggest that these models have a high predictive value.
4.  Role of afferent-hair cell connectivity in determining spike train regularity (Holmes et al 2017)
"Vestibular bouton afferent terminals in turtle utricle can be categorized into four types depending on their location and terminal arbor structure: lateral extrastriolar (LES), striolar, juxtastriolar, and medial extrastriolar (MES). The terminal arbors of these afferents differ in surface area, total length, collecting area, number of boutons, number of bouton contacts per hair cell, and axon diameter (Huwe JA, Logan CJ, Williams B, Rowe MH, Peterson EH. J Neurophysiol 113: 2420 –2433, 2015). To understand how differences in terminal morphology and the resulting hair cell inputs might affect afferent response properties, we modeled representative afferents from each region, using reconstructed bouton afferents. ..."
5.  Spike burst-pause dynamics of Purkinje cells regulate sensorimotor adaptation (Luque et al 2019)
"Cerebellar Purkinje cells mediate accurate eye movement coordination. However, it remains unclear how oculomotor adaptation depends on the interplay between the characteristic Purkinje cell response patterns, namely tonic, bursting, and spike pauses. Here, a spiking cerebellar model assesses the role of Purkinje cell firing patterns in vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) adaptation. The model captures the cerebellar microcircuit properties and it incorporates spike-based synaptic plasticity at multiple cerebellar sites. ..."

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