Models that contain the Neuron : Neocortex U1 L2/6 pyramidal intratelencephalic GLU cell

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    Models   Description
1.  5-neuron-model of neocortex for producing realistic extracellular AP shapes (Van Dijck et al. 2012)
This is a 5-neuron model of neocortex, containing one tufted layer-5 pyramidal cell, two non-tufted pyramidal cells, and two inhibitory interneurons. It was used to reproduce extracellular spike shapes in a study comparing algorithms for spike sorting and electrode selection. The neuron models are adapted from Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen et al. (2005).
2.  A multilayer cortical model to study seizure propagation across microdomains (Basu et al. 2015)
A realistic neural network was used to simulate a region of neocortex to obtain extracellular LFPs from ‘virtual micro-electrodes’ and produce test data for comparison with multisite microelectrode recordings. A model was implemented in the GENESIS neurosimulator. A simulated region of cortex was represented by layers 2/3, 5/6 (interneurons and pyramidal cells) and layer 4 stelate cells, spaced at 25 µm in each horizontal direction. Pyramidal cells received AMPA and NMDA inputs from neighboring cells at the basal and apical dendrites. The LFP data was generated by simulating 16-site electrode array with the help of ‘efield’ objects arranged at the predetermined positions with respect to the surface of the simulated network. The LFP for the model is derived from a weighted average of the current sources summed over all cellular compartments. Cell models were taken from from Traub et al. (2005) J Neurophysiol 93(4):2194-232.
3.  A single column thalamocortical network model (Traub et al 2005)
To better understand population phenomena in thalamocortical neuronal ensembles, we have constructed a preliminary network model with 3,560 multicompartment neurons (containing soma, branching dendrites, and a portion of axon). Types of neurons included superficial pyramids (with regular spiking [RS] and fast rhythmic bursting [FRB] firing behaviors); RS spiny stellates; fast spiking (FS) interneurons, with basket-type and axoaxonic types of connectivity, and located in superficial and deep cortical layers; low threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, that contacted principal cell dendrites; deep pyramids, that could have RS or intrinsic bursting (IB) firing behaviors, and endowed either with non-tufted apical dendrites or with long tufted apical dendrites; thalamocortical relay (TCR) cells; and nucleus reticularis (nRT) cells. To the extent possible, both electrophysiology and synaptic connectivity were based on published data, although many arbitrary choices were necessary.
4.  Accurate and fast simulation of channel noise in conductance-based model neurons (Linaro et al 2011)
We introduce and operatively present a general method to simulate channel noise in conductance-based model neurons, with modest computational overheads. Our approach may be considered as an accurate generalization of previous proposal methods, to the case of voltage-, ion-, and ligand-gated channels with arbitrary complexity. We focus on the discrete Markov process descriptions, routinely employed in experimental identification of voltage-gated channels and synaptic receptors.
5.  Action Potential initiation and backpropagation in Neocortical L5 Pyramidal Neuron (Hu et al. 2009)
"...Previous computational studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the role of Na+ channel density and biophysical properties in action potential initiation as a result of inconsistent estimates of channel density. Our modeling studies integrated the immunostaining and electrophysiological results and showed that the lowest threshold for action potential initiation at the distal AIS was largely determined by the density of low-threshold Nav1.6 channels ... Distinct from the function of Nav1.6 channel, the Nav1.2 channel may control action potential backpropagation because of its high density at the proximal AIS and high threshold. ... In conclusion, distal AIS accumulation of Nav1.6 channels determines the low threshold for action potential initiation; whereas proximal AIS accumulation of Nav1.2 channels sets the threshold for the generation of somatodendritic potentials and ensures action potential backpropagation to the soma and dendrites. Thus, Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 channels serve distinct functions in action potential initiation and backpropagation."
6.  An electrophysiological model of GABAergic double bouquet cells (Chrysanthidis et al. 2019)
We present an electrophysiological model of double bouquet cells (DBCs) and integrate them into an established cortical columnar microcircuit model that implements a BCPNN (Bayesian Confidence Propagation Neural Network) learning rule. The proposed architecture effectively solves the problem of duplexed learning of inhibition and excitation by replacing recurrent inhibition between pyramidal cells in functional columns of different stimulus selectivity with a plastic disynaptic pathway. The introduction of DBCs improves the biological plausibility of our model, without affecting the model's spiking activity, basic operation, and learning abilities.
7.  AP initiation, propagation, and cortical invasion in a Layer 5 pyramidal cell (Anderson et 2018)
" ... High frequency (~130 Hz) deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic region is an established clinical therapy for the treatment of late stage Parkinson's disease (PD). Direct modulation of the hyperdirect pathway, defined as cortical layer V pyramidal neurons that send an axon collateral to the subthalamic nucleus (STN), has emerged as a possible component of the therapeutic mechanisms. ...We found robust AP propagation throughout the complex axonal arbor of the hyperdirect neuron. Even at therapeutic DBS frequencies, stimulation induced APs could reach all of the intracortical axon terminals with ~100% fidelity. The functional result of this high frequency axonal driving of the thousands of synaptic connections made by each directly stimulated hyperdirect neuron is a profound synaptic suppression that would effectively disconnect the neuron from the cortical circuitry. ..."
8.  Biologically Constrained Basal Ganglia model (BCBG model) (Lienard, Girard 2014)
We studied the physiology and function of the basal ganglia through the design of mean-field models of the whole basal ganglia. The parameterizations are optimized with multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to respect best a collection of numerous anatomical data and electrophysiological data. The main outcomes of our study are: • The strength of the GPe to GPi/SNr connection does not support opposed activities in the GPe and GPi/SNr. • STN and MSN target more the GPe than the GPi/SNr. • Selection arises from the structure of the basal ganglia, without properly segregated direct and indirect pathways and without specific inputs from pyramidal tract neurons of the cortex. Selection is enhanced when the projection from GPe to GPi/SNr has a diffuse pattern.
9.  Dendritica (Vetter et al 2001)
Dendritica is a collection of programs for relating dendritic geometry and signal propagation. The programs are based on those used for the simulations described in: Vetter, P., Roth, A. & Hausser, M. (2001) For reprint requests and additional information please contact Dr. M. Hausser, email address: m.hausser@ucl.ac.uk
10.  Determinants of fast calcium dynamics in dendritic spines and dendrites (Cornelisse et al. 2007)
"... Calcium influx time course and calcium extrusion rate were both in the same range for spines and dendrites when fitted with a dynamic multi-compartment model that included calcium binding kinetics and diffusion. In a subsequent analysis we used this model to investigate which parameters are critical determinants in spine calcium dynamics. The model confirmed the experimental findings: a higher SVR (surface-to-volume ratio) is not sufficient by itself to explain the faster rise time kinetics in spines, but only when paired with a lower buffer capacity in spines. Simulations at zero calcium-dye conditions show that calmodulin is more efficiently activated in spines, which indicates that spine morphology and buffering conditions in neocortical spines favor synaptic plasticity. ..."
11.  Direct recruitment of S1 pyramidal cells and interneurons via ICMS (Overstreet et al., 2013)
Study of the pyramidal cells and interneurons recruited by intracortical microstimulation in primary somatosensory cortex. Code includes morphological models for seven types of pyramidal cells and eight types of interneurons, NEURON code to simulate ICMS, and an artificial reconstruction of a 3D slab of cortex implemented in MATLAB.
12.  Fronto-parietal visuospatial WM model with HH cells (Edin et al 2007)
1) J Cogn Neurosci: 3 structural mechanisms that had been hypothesized to underlie vsWM development during childhood were evaluated by simulating the model and comparing results to fMRI. It was concluded that inter-regional synaptic connection strength cause vsWM development. 2) J Integr Neurosci: Given the importance of fronto-parietal connections, we tested whether connection asymmetry affected resistance to distraction. We drew the conclusion that stronger frontal connections are beneficial. By comparing model results to EEG, we concluded that the brain indeed has stronger frontal-to-parietal connections than vice versa.
13.  Laminar analysis of excitatory circuits in vibrissal motor and sensory cortex (Hooks et al. 2011)
"... We mapped local excitatory pathways in each area (primary motor cortex (vM1), primary somatosensory cortex (vS1; barrel cortex), and secondary somatosensory cortex (S2)) across all cortical layers using glutamate uncaging and laser scanning photostimulation. We analyzed these maps to derive laminar connectivity matrices describing the average strengths of pathways between individual neurons in different layers and between entire cortical layers. ..."
14.  MEG of Somatosensory Neocortex (Jones et al. 2007)
"... To make a direct and principled connection between the SI (somatosensory primary neocortex magnetoencephalography) waveform and underlying neural dynamics, we developed a biophysically realistic computational SI model that contained excitatory and inhibitory neurons in supragranular and infragranular layers. ... our model provides a biophysically realistic solution to the MEG signal and can predict the electrophysiological correlates of human perception."
15.  Multitarget pharmacology for Dystonia in M1 (Neymotin et al 2016)
" ... We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. ..."
16.  Neocort. pyramidal cells subthreshold somatic voltage controls spike propagation (Munro Kopell 2012)
There is suggestive evidence that pyramidal cell axons in neocortex may be coupled by gap junctions into an ``axonal plexus" capable of generating Very Fast Oscillations (VFOs) with frequencies exceeding 80 Hz. It is not obvious, however, how a pyramidal cell in such a network could control its output when action potentials are free to propagate from the axons of other pyramidal cells into its own axon. We address this problem by means of simulations based on 3D reconstructions of pyramidal cells from rat somatosensory cortex. We show that somatic depolarization enables propagation via gap junctions into the initial segment and main axon, while somatic hyperpolarization disables it. We show further that somatic voltage cannot effectively control action potential propagation through gap junctions on minor collaterals; action potentials may therefore propagate freely from such collaterals regardless of somatic voltage. In previous work, VFOs are all but abolished during the hyperpolarization phase of slow-oscillations induced by anesthesia in vivo. This finding constrains the density of gap junctions on collaterals in our model and suggests that axonal sprouting due to cortical lesions may result in abnormally high gap junction density on collaterals, leading in turn to excessive VFO activity and hence to epilepsy via kindling.
17.  Sensorimotor cortex reinforcement learning of 2-joint virtual arm reaching (Neymotin et al. 2013)
"... We developed a model of sensory and motor neocortex consisting of 704 spiking model-neurons. Sensory and motor populations included excitatory cells and two types of interneurons. Neurons were interconnected with AMPA/NMDA, and GABAA synapses. We trained our model using spike-timing-dependent reinforcement learning to control a 2-joint virtual arm to reach to a fixed target. ... "
18.  Simulations of oscillations in piriform cortex (Wilson & Bower 1992)
"1. A large-scale computer model of the piriform cortex was constructed on the basis of the known anatomic and physiological organization of this region. 2. The oscillatory field potential and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity generated by the model was compared with actual physiological results. The model was able to produce patterns of activity similar to those recorded physiologically in response to both weak and strong electrical shocks to the afferent input. The model also generated activity patterns similar to EEGs recorded in behaving animals. 3. ..."
19.  The origin of different spike and wave-like events (Hall et al 2017)
Acute In vitro models have revealed a great deal of information about mechanisms underlying many types of epileptiform activity. However, few examples exist that shed light on spike and wave (SpW) patterns of pathological activity. SpW are seen in many epilepsy syndromes, both generalised and focal, and manifest across the entire age spectrum. They are heterogeneous in terms of their severity, symptom burden and apparent anatomical origin (thalamic, neocortical or both), but any relationship between this heterogeneity and underlying pathology remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that physiological delta frequency rhythms act as an effective substrate to permit modelling of SpW of cortical origin and may help to address this issue. ..."
20.  Unbalanced peptidergic inhibition in superficial cortex underlies seizure activity (Hall et al 2015)
" ...Loss of tonic neuromodulatory excitation, mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine or serotonin (5HT3A) receptors, of 5HT3-immunopositive interneurons caused an increase in amplitude and slowing of the delta rhythm until each period became the "wave" component of the spike and wave discharge. As with the normal delta rhythm, the wave of a spike and wave discharge originated in cortical layer 5. In contrast, the "spike" component of the spike and wave discharge originated from a relative failure of fast inhibition in layers 2/3-switching pyramidal cell action potential outputs from single, sparse spiking during delta rhythms to brief, intense burst spiking, phase-locked to the field spike. The mechanisms underlying this loss of superficial layer fast inhibition, and a concomitant increase in slow inhibition, appeared to be precipitated by a loss of neuropeptide Y (NPY)-mediated local circuit inhibition and a subsequent increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated disinhibition. Blockade of NPY Y1 receptors was sufficient to generate spike and wave discharges, whereas blockade of VIP receptors almost completely abolished this form of epileptiform activity. These data suggest that aberrant, activity-dependent neuropeptide corelease can have catastrophic effects on neocortical dynamics."

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